Applied sciences

Archives of Thermodynamics

Content

Archives of Thermodynamics | 2010 | No 3 September |

Abstract

The paper presents the solution to a problem of determining the heat flux density and the heat transfer coefficient, on the basis of temperature measurement at three locations in the flat sensor, with the assumption that the heat conductivity of the sensor material is temperature dependent. Three different methods for determining the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient, with their practical applications, are presented. The uncertainties in the determined values are also estimated.

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Abstract

In this paper a mathematical model enabling the analysis of the heat-flow phenomena occurring in the waterwalls of the combustion chambers of the boilers for supercritical parameters is proposed. It is a one-dimensional model with distributed parameters based on the solution of equations describing the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. The purpose of the numerical calculations is to determine the distributions of the fluid enthalpy and the temperature of the waterwall pipes. This temperature should not exceed the calculation temperature for particular category of steel. The derived differential equations are solved using two methods: with the use of the implicit difference scheme, in which the mesh with regular nodes was applied, and using the Runge-Kutta method. The temperature distribution of the waterwall pipes is determined using the CFD. All thermophysical properties of the fluid and waterwall pipes are computed in real-time. The time-spatial heat transfer coefficient distribution is also computed in the on-line mode. The heat calculations for the combustion chamber are carried out with the use of the zone method, thus the thermal load distribution of the waterwalls is known. The time needed for the computations is of great importance when taking into consideration calculations carried out in the on-line mode. A correctly solved one-dimensional model ensures the appropriately short computational time.

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Abstract

CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) computations are carried out in order to investigate the flow distribution and its influence on the heat transfer processes in the high-performance heat exchanger. The subject of this investigation is the classical model of the high-performance heat exchanger with elliptical tubes and rectangular fins. It is possible to find the flow domains where the heat transfer conditions are impaired due to the fully developed turbulent flow. Therefore, the considerable thermal loads occur that may cause the breakdown of the heat exchanger. The emphasis of this investigation is put on the zones and the locations where the tubes are not properly fed with liquid, that result in occurrence of cavitation.

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Abstract

Construction elements of supercritical power plants are subjected to high working pressures and high temperatures while operating. Under these conditions high stresses in the construction are created. In order to operate safely, it is important to monitor stresses, especially during start-up and shut-down processes. The maximum stresses in the construction elements should not exceed the allowable stress limit. The goal is to find optimum operating parameters that can assure safe heating and cooling processes [1-5]. The optimum parameters should guarantee that the allowable stresses are not exceeded and the entire process is conducted in the shortest time. In this work new numerical method for determining optimum working parameters is presented. Based on these parameters heating operations were conducted. Stresses were monitored during the entire processes. The results obtained were compared with the German boiler regulations - Technische Regeln für Dampfkessel 301.

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Abstract

In this paper, flow systems which are commonly used in fittings elements such as contractions in ice slurry pipelines, are experimentally investigated. In the study reported in this paper, the consideration was given to the specific features of the ice slurry flow in which the flow behaviour depends mainly on the volume fraction of solid particles. The results of the experimental studies on the flow resistance, presented herein, enabled to determine the loss coefficient during the ice slurry flow through the sudden pipe contraction. The mass fraction of solid particles in the slurry ranged from 5 to 30%. The experimental studies were conducted on a few variants of the most common contractions of copper pipes: 28/22 mm, 28/18 mm, 28/15 mm, 22/18 mm, 22/15 mm and 18/15 mm. The recommended (with respect to minimal flow resistance) range of the Reynolds number (Re about 3000-4000) for the ice slurry flow through sudden contractions was presented in this paper.

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Abstract

The optimization of finned tube heat exchanger is presented focusing on different fluid velocities and the consideration of aerodynamic configuration of the fin. It is reasonable to expect an influence of fin profile on the fluid streamline direction. In the cross-flow heat exchanger, the air streams are not heated and cooled evenly. The fin and tube geometry affects the flow direction and influences temperature changes. The heat transfer conditions are modified by changing the distribution of fluid mass flow. The fin profile impact also depends on the air velocity value. Three-dimensional models are developed to find heat transfer characteristics between a finned tube and the air for different air velocities and fin shapes. Mass flow weighted average temperatures of air volume flow rate are calculated in the outlet section and compared for different fin/tube shapes in order to optimize heat transfer between the fin material and air during the air flow in the cross flow heat exchanger.

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Abstract

This paper presents a method for assessing the degree of approaching the paper output of the Clausius-Rankine cycle to the Carnot cycle. The computations to illustrate its use were performed for parameters characteristic of the current state of development of condensing power plants as well as in accordance with predicted trends for their further enhancing. Moreover there are presented computations of energy dissipation in the machines and devices working in such a cycle.

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Abstract

This paper presents the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) analysis concerning the selected options of supercritical coal power units. The investigation covers a pulverized power unit without a CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) installation, a pulverized unit with a "post-combustion" installation (MEA type) and a pulverized power unit working in the "oxy-combustion" mode. For each variant the net electric power amounts to 600 MW. The energy component of the LCA analysis has been determined. It describes the depletion of non-renewable natural resources. The energy component is determined by the coefficient of cumulative energy consumption in the life cycle. For the calculation of the ecological component of the LCA analysis the cumulative CO2 emission has been applied. At present it is the basic emission factor for the LCA analysis of power plants. The work also presents the sensitivity analysis of calculated energy and ecological factors.

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Abstract

The problem presented in this paper refers to the concepts applied to the design of supercritical steam turbines. The issue under the investigation is the presence of a cooling system. Cooling systems aim to protect the main components of the turbines against overheating. However the cooling flows mix with the main flow and modify the expansion line in the steam path. This affects the expansion process in the turbine and changes the performance when compared to the uncooled turbine. The analysis described here investigates the range of the influence of the cooling system on the turbine cycle. This influence is measured mainly through the change of the power generation efficiency. The paper explains the approach towards the assessment of the cooling effects and presents results of the modeling for three supercritical steam cycles.

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Abstract

Integrated gasification combined cycle systems (IGCC) are becoming more popular because of the characteristics, by which they are characterized, including low pollutants emissions, relatively high efficiency of electricity production and the ability to integrate the installation of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Currently, the most frequently used CO2 capture technology in IGCC systems is based on the absorption process. This method causes a significant increase of the internal load and decreases the efficiency of the entire system. It is therefore necessary to look for new methods of carbon dioxide capture. The authors of the present paper propose the use of membrane separation. The paper reviews available membranes for use in IGCC systems, indicates, inter alia, possible places of their implementation in the system and the required operation parameters. Attention is drawn to the most important parameters of membranes (among other selectivity and permeability) influencing the cost and performance of the whole installation. Numerical model of a membrane was used, among others, to analyze the influence of the basic parameters of the selected membranes on the purity and recovery ratio of the obtained permeate, as well as to determine the energetic cost of the use of membranes for the CO2 separation in IGCC systems. The calculations were made within the environment of the commercial package Aspen Plus. For the calculations both, membranes selective for carbon dioxide and membranes selective for hydrogen were used. Properly selected pressure before and after membrane module allowed for minimization of energy input on CCS installation assuring high purity and recovery ratio of separated gas.

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Abstract

Research oriented on identification of operating states variations with the application of mathematical models of thermal processes has been developed in the field of energy processes diagnostics. Simple models, characterised by short calculation time, are necessary for thermal diagnostics needs. Such models can be obtained using empirical modelling methods. Good results brings the construction of analytical model with auxiliary empirical built-in functions. The paper presents a mathematical model of a steam-water cycle containing mass and energy balances and semiempirical models of steam expansion line in turbine as well as heat transfer in exchangers. A model of steam expansion line in a turbine is worked out with the application of a steam flow capacity equation and an internal efficiency of process equation for each group of stages for the analysed turbine. A model of a heat exchanger contains energy balance and the relation describing heat transfer in an exchanger, proposed by Beckman. Estimation of empirical equations coefficients was realised with the application of special and reliable measurements. Estimation criterion was a weighted relative sum of the remainder squares. There are exemplary calculations results presented in the final part of paper.

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Abstract

The authors presented problems related to utilization of exhaust gases of the gas turbine unit for production of electricity in an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power plant. The study shows that the thermal coupling of ORC cycle with a gas turbine unit improves the efficiency of the system. The undertaken analysis concerned four the so called "dry" organic fluids: benzene, cyclohexane, decane and toluene. The paper also presents the way how to improve thermal efficiency of Clausius-Rankine cycle in ORC power plant. This method depends on applying heat regeneration in ORC cycle, which involves pre-heating the organic fluid via vapour leaving the ORC turbine. As calculations showed this solution allows to considerably raise the thermal efficiency of Clausius-Rankine cycle.

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Editorial office

Honorary Editor
Wiesław Gogół, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland

Editor-in-Chief
Jarosław Mikielewicz, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery PAS, Poland

Deputy
Marian Trela, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery PAS, Poland

Members of Editorial Commitee
Roman Domanski, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Andrzej Ziębik, Technical University of Silesia, Poland

Managing Editor
Jarosław Frączak, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery PAS, Poland

International Advisory Board
J. Bataille, Ecole Central de Lyon, Ecully, France
A. Bejan, Duke University,  Durham, USA
W. Blasiak, Royal Institute of Technology,  Stockholm, Sweden
G. P. Celata, ENEA,  Rome, Italy
M. W. Collins, South Bank University,  London, UK
J. M. Delhaye, CEA, Grenoble, France
M. Giot, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium
D. Jackson, University of Manchester, UK
S. Michaelides, University of North Texas, Denton, USA
M. Moran, Ohio State University,  Columbus, USA
W. Muschik, Technische Universität, Berlin, Germany
I. Müller, Technische Universität, Berlin, Germany
V. E. Nakoryakov, Institute of Thermophysics, Novosibirsk, Russia
M. Podowski, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, USA
M.R. von Spakovsky, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, USA

Contact

IFFM Publishers (Wydawnictwo IMP),

The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery,
Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdańsk, Poland,
telephone: +48 58 6995141, fax: +48 58 3416144,
e-mail: jfrk@imp.gda.pl; now@imp.gda.pl

 

 

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AIAA Journal 8(1970), No. 11, 2004–2009.
 
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