Applied sciences

Archives of Thermodynamics

Content

Archives of Thermodynamics | 2016 | No 2 |

Abstract

An approach – relaying on application of nanofluid as a working fluid, to improve performance of the two-phase thermosyphon heat exchanger (TPTHEx) has been proposed. The prototype heat exchanger consists of two horizontal cylindrical vessels connected by two risers and a downcomer. Tube bundles placed in the lower and upper cylinders work as an evaporator and a condenser, respectively. Distilled water and nanofluid water-Al2O3solution were used as working fluids. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.01% and 0.1% by weight. A modified Peclet equation and Wilson method were used to estimate the overall heat transfer coefficient of the tested TPTHEx. The obtained results indicate better performance of the TPTHEx with nanofluids as working fluid compared to distilled water, independent of nanoparticle concentration tested. However, increase in nanoparticle concentration results in overall heat transfer coefficient decrease of the TPTHEx examined. It has been observed that, independent of nanoparticle concentration tested, decrease in operating pressure results in evaporation heat transfer coefficient increase.

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Abstract

In the paper, the results of numerical simulations of the steam flow in a shell and tube heat exchanger are presented. The efficiency of different models of turbulence was tested. In numerical calculations the following turbulence models were used: k-ε, RNG k-ε, Wilcox k-ω, Chen-Kim k-ε, and Lam-Bremhorst k-ε. Numerical analysis of the steam flow was carried out assuming that the flow at the inlet section of the heat exchanger were divided into three parts. The angle of steam flow at inlet section was determined individually in order to obtain the best configuration of entry vanes and hence improve the heat exchanger construction. Results of numerical studies were verified experimentally for a real heat exchanger. The modification of the inlet flow direction according to theoretical considerations causes the increase of thermal power of a heat exchanger of about 14%.

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Abstract

In the paper presented are the results of calculations using authors own model to predict heat transfer coefficient during flow boiling of carbon dioxide. The experimental data from various researches were collected. Calculations were conducted for a full range of quality variation and a wide range of mass velocity. The aim of the study was to test the sensitivity of the in-house model. The results show the importance of taking into account the surface tension as the parameter exhibiting its importance in case of the flow in minichannels as well as the influence of reduced pressure. The calculations were accomplished to test the sensitivity of the heat transfer model with respect to selection of the appropriate two-phase flow multiplier, which is one of the elements of the heat transfer model. For that purpose correlations due to Müller-Steinhagen and Heck as well as the one due to Friedel were considered. Obtained results show a good consistency with experimental results, however the selection of two-phase flow multiplier does not significantly influence the consistency of calculations.

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Abstract

The focus of research works on cavitation has changed since the 1960s; the behaviour of a single bubble is no more the area of interest for most scientists. Its place was taken by the cavitating flow considered as a whole. Many numerical models of cavitating flows came into being within the space of the last fifty years. They can be divided into two groups: multifluid and homogeneous (i.e., single-fluid) models. The group of homogenous models contains two subgroups: models based on transport equation and pressure based models. Several works tried to order particular approaches and presented short reviews of selected studies. However, these classifications are too rough to be treated as sufficiently accurate. The aim of this paper is to present the development paths of numerical investigations of cavitating flows with the use of homogeneous approach in order of publication year and with relatively detailed description. Each of the presented model is accompanied by examples of the application area. This review focuses not only on the list of the most significant existing models to predict sheet and cloud cavitation, but also on presenting their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, it shows the reasons which inspired present authors to look for new ways of more accurate numerical predictions and dimensions of cavitation. The article includes also the division of source terms of presented models based on the transport equation with the use of standardized symbols.

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Abstract

The presence of nanoparticles in heat exchangers ascertained increment in heat transfer. The present work focuses on heat transfer in a longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger. Experimentation is done on longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger with pure water as working fluid and the outcome is compared numerically using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package based on finite volume method for different flow rates. Further 0.8% volume fraction of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanofluid is considered on shell side. The simulated nanofluid analysis has been carried out using single phase approach in CFD by updating the user-defined functions and expressions with thermophysical properties of the selected nanofluid. These results are thereafter compared against the results obtained for pure water as shell side fluid. Entropy generated due to heat transfer and fluid flow is calculated for the nanofluid. Analysis of entropy generation is carried out using the Taguchi technique. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results show that the inlet temperature on shell side has more pronounced effect on entropy generation.

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Abstract

The paper presents the results of experimental heat transfer and pressure drop during condensation of the single component refrigerant R134a and zeotropic mixtures R404A, R407C, and R410A in tube minichannels of internal diameter from the range 0.31–3.30 mm. The local values and the average of heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in the whole range of the change in mass quality were measured. On the basis of the obtained test results there was illustrated the influence of the change of mass vapor quality, the mass flux density, and the inner diameter of channel on the studied parameters. These results were compared with the calculation results based on the relations postulated by other authors. The discrepancy range was ± 50%. On the basis of given test results own correlation was developed to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of tested refrigerants which presents the obtained results in a range of discrepancy of ±25%.

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Editorial office

Honorary Editor
Wiesław Gogół, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland

Editor-in-Chief
Jarosław Mikielewicz, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery PAS, Poland

Deputy
Marian Trela, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery PAS, Poland

Members of Editorial Commitee
Roman Domanski, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Andrzej Ziębik, Technical University of Silesia, Poland

Managing Editor
Jarosław Frączak, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery PAS, Poland

International Advisory Board
J. Bataille, Ecole Central de Lyon, Ecully, France
A. Bejan, Duke University,  Durham, USA
W. Blasiak, Royal Institute of Technology,  Stockholm, Sweden
G. P. Celata, ENEA,  Rome, Italy
M. W. Collins, South Bank University,  London, UK
J. M. Delhaye, CEA, Grenoble, France
M. Giot, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium
D. Jackson, University of Manchester, UK
S. Michaelides, University of North Texas, Denton, USA
M. Moran, Ohio State University,  Columbus, USA
W. Muschik, Technische Universität, Berlin, Germany
I. Müller, Technische Universität, Berlin, Germany
V. E. Nakoryakov, Institute of Thermophysics, Novosibirsk, Russia
M. Podowski, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, USA
M.R. von Spakovsky, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, USA

Contact

IFFM Publishers (Wydawnictwo IMP),

The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery,
Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdańsk, Poland,
telephone: +48 58 6995141, fax: +48 58 3416144,
e-mail: jfrk@imp.gda.pl; now@imp.gda.pl

 

 

Instructions for authors

Archives of Thermodynamics publishes original papers which have not previously appeared in other journals. The language of the papers is English. No paper should exceed the length of 25 pages. All pages should be numbered. The plan and form of the papers should be as follows:
 

1. The heading should specify the title (as short as possible), author, his/her complete affiliation, town, zip code, country and e-mail. Please show the corresponding author. The heading should be followed by Abstract of maximum 15 typewritten lines.

2. More important symbols used in the paper can be listed in Nomenclature, placed below Summary and arranged in a column, e.g.:
u – velocity, m/s
v – specific volume, m/kg
etc.
The list should begin with Latin symbols in alphabetical order followed by Greek symbols also in alphabetical order and with a separate heading. Subscripts and superscripts should follow Greek symbols and should be identified with separate headings. Physical quantities should expressed in SI units.

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7. Computer files on an enclosed disc or sent by e-mail to the Editorial Office are welcome. The manuscript should be written as a Word file – ¤:doc or LATEX file –¤:tex.
 
8. The references for the paper should be numbered in the order in which they are called in the text. Calling the references is by giving the appropriate numbers in square brackets. The references should be listed with the following information provided: the author’s surname and the initials of his/her names, the complete title of the work (in English translation) and, in addition:
 
(a) for books: the publishing house and the place and year of publication, for example:
`1` Holman J.P.: Heat Transfer. McGraw-Hill, New York 1968.
 
(b) for journals: the name of the journal, volume (Arabic numerals in bold), year of publication (in round brackets), number and, if appropriate, numbers of relevant pages, for example: 
`2` Rizzo F.I., Shippy D.I.: A method of solution for certain problems of transient heat conduction.
AIAA Journal 8(1970), No. 11, 2004–2009.
 
9. As the papers are published in English, the authors who are not native speakers of English are obliged to have the paper thoroughly reviewed language-wise before submitting for publication.

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