Nauki Biologiczne i Rolnicze

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Zawartość

Journal of Plant Protection Research | 2018 | vol. 58 | No 1 |

Abstrakt

Solanaceae plants have strong allelopathic potential, and therefore the action is confirmed through: a) bioassays with liquid or various solvent extracts and residues, b) fractionation, identification, and quantification of causative allelochemicals. Most assessments of allelopathy involve bioassays of plant or soil extracts, leachates, fractions, and residues which support seed germination and seedling growth in laboratory and greenhouse experiments. Plant growth is also stimulated below the allelopathic threshold, however severe growth reductions may be observed above the threshold concentration depending on the sensitivity of the receiving species. Generally, seedling growth is more sensitive than germination, particularly root growth. Some approaches showed that field soil collected beneath donor plants significantly reduced or somewhat promoted the growth of the recipients plants. Petri dish bioassays with aqueous extracts of different parts of donor plants showed considerable phytotoxic activities in a concentration-dependent manner with leaf aqueous extracts being most dominant. Delayed seed germination and slow root growth attributable to the extracts may be baffled with diffusion effects on the rate of imbibition, delayed initiation of germination, and particularly cell elongation; the main factor that is responsible for affecting root growth before and after the tip penetrates the testa. Light and electron microscopy extract analysis at the ultrastructural level are correctly investigated. Several Solanaceae plants have allelopathic potential, and therefore the activities, kinds and quantity of allelopathic compounds differ depending on the plant species. The incorporation of allelopathic substances into agricultural management might scale back the development of pesticides and reduce environmental deterioration.
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Abstrakt

The future of food security in Africa is being severely threatened due to an exponential increase in population, which is almost three times the increase of food production. Maize production is constrained by stem borers which cause significant yield losses. Yield losses can be further compounded by higher temperatures due to climate changes, which are expected to increase the population of maize stem borers. While several methods have been employed in stem borer management, there is still significant damage caused by maize stem borers. This necessitates better control methods including the adoption of recent biotechnological advancement in RNA interference (RNAi) technology. This review highlights evidence of an increase in the stem borer population as well as the foreseen decline in maize production worldwide due to the effects of climatic changes. Furthermore, we have drawn attention to improved methods that have been used to control stem borers in maize production as well as a reluctant acceptance of traditional biotechnology in Africa. Finally, we suggest the application of alternative RNA interference techniques to breed maize for efficient pest control in order to achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable maize production.
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The present report describes the new occurrence of Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) in cabbage, bean and Malva neglecta plants in Iran. In this study, sequence analyses of a partial RNA dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) and complete movement protein (MP) and the coat protein (CP) nucleotide sequences of three new ToMV isolates collected from major crop fields in Iran revealed low genetic variation of RdRp gene compared to the CP and MP genes. The different topologies of the phylogenetic trees constructed, using available open reading frame (ORF1), ORF2 and ORF3 sequences from ToMV isolates, indicated different evolutionary constraints in these genomic regions. Statistical analysis also revealed that with the exception of CP other tested ToMV genes were under negative selection and the RdRp gene was under the strongest constraints. According to the phylogenetic tree it can be inferred from the nucleotide sequences of the complete CP and MP genes, that isolates from Iran and Egypt formed separate groups, irrespective of host origin. However, isolates clustered into groups with correlation to geographic origin but not the host. Analysis of the Ks *, Z* and Snn values also indicated genetic differentiation between ToMV populations. The Tajima’s D, Fu and Li’s statistical values were significantly negative for the RdRp gene of the Asian population which suggests the sudden expansion of ToMV in Asia. Taken together, the results indicate that negative selection and genetic drift were important evolutionary factors driving the genetic diversification of ToMV.
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Fluorescent Pseudomonas (FP) is a major group of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and a well-known synthesizer of siderophores, which imparts a selective advantage on rhizosphere competence and their biocontrol traits. The present study was aimed at examining the factors affecting the production of siderophores and their potential biocontrol traits. Sixteen FP isolates were shortlisted based on their siderophore-producing ability in chrome azural S medium. The isolates were checked for variations in siderophore production under varying incubation times, temperatures, pH, iron (Fe3+) concentrations and mutagens. In addition, the iron binding affinity of siderophores, mycelial inhibition assay and plant growth promotion traits were assessed. Results showed that the siderophore production was highly influenced by the time of incubation, changes in pH, temperature and iron concentration. Chemical characterization showed that the produced siderophores were hydroxamates. Maximum siderophore production was observed at pH 7 whereas UV and EtBr exposure invariably suppressed siderophore production drastically in all isolates. All FPs from maize rhizosphere showed excellent siderophore production which could be due to the competence in strategy-II of the plant rhizosphere and significant growth inhibition on Fusarium oxysporum. Our results suggest the inclination of siderophores to iron, in terms of various criteria affecting production and the possible role of environmental mutations that affect the natural iron harvesting mechanism.
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Abstrakt

Many species of Trichoderma produce secondary metabolites such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that reduce plant diseases and promote their growth. In this work we evaluated the antagonistic effects of VOCs released by eight strains of two Trichoderma species against Pyrenophora teres Drechsler, the causal agent of barley net blotch. Antagonism was estimated based on the percentage of mycelial growth inhibition according to the confronted cultures method. VOCs extraction and identification were performed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, through different methodologies for VOCs emitted by antagonists and pathogens alone or when confronted. VOCs produced by all Trichoderma strains inhibited mycelial growth of the pathogen in a range of 3 to 32%, showing weak and unpigmented mycelia with vacuolization. In addition, P. teres stimulated the release of VOCs by both Trichoderma species. The major groups of VOCs detected were sesquiterpenes, followed by diterpenes, terpenoids and eight-carbon compounds. This is the first report about characterization of volatiles emitted by Trichoderma in the presence of P. teres.
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Abstrakt

Wheat dwarf virus (WDV) has been one of the most common viruses on cereal crops in Poland in the last years. This single stranded DNA virus is transmitted by the leafhopper spec, Psammotettix alienus (Dahlb.) in a persistent manner. It induces yellowing and streaking of leaves, dwarfing or even death of infected plants. The presence of barley- and wheat-specific forms of WDV (WDV-B and WDV-W) and their vector were previously reported in the country, however the literature data did not include any information on the infectivity of the vector in Poland. A duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure was developed and optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of both forms in the vector. Two sets of primers amplify 734 bp and 483 bp specific fragments for WDV-W and WDV-B, respectively. The results were verified by a sequencing method. The studies were carried out on insect samples collected in autumn from four different locations in Greater Poland. The results confirmed the presence of WDV-W in the tested samples. They also suggested the concomitant of both forms of the virus in the vector. Additional studies to determine virus-vector relationships should be undertaken.
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The vegetation of allotment gardens is an important element of urban green areas and constitutes a habitat where many groups of insects exist, including aphids. This research involved the monitoring of winged morphs of aphids in allotment gardens in the area of Poznań with the use of Moericke traps. The fauna structure of aphids in two large allotment gardens was demonstrated by comparing the activity of winged morphs of aphids in 2000–2001 and 2014–2015. The vegetation of these gardens was accompanied by the rich fauna of aphids. For four growing seasons, 113 species or groups of aphid species were captured with the traps. Major changes were reported in the structure of the collected fauna in the period of time when the research was conducted. The differences concerned particular positions of collected species in aphid communities. The abundance of Anoecia corni, Aphis sambuci, Phorodon humuli and Periphyllus testudinaceus increased, and now hold the position of subdominants of the communities, whereas Myzus persicae and Hyalopterus pruni decreased in comparison with the situation more than ten years ago. Rhopalosiphum padi still remains an eudominant in the communities. The main reason for this phenomenon is thought to be due to changes in the vegetation composition of gardens because the gardens are being used differently. The production function has changed to recreation.
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Abstrakt

Nanodiagonastic methods in plant pathology are used for enhancing detection and identification of different plant pathogens and toxigenic fungi. Improvement of the specificity and efficiency of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using some nanoparticles is emerging as a new area of research. In the current research, silver, zinc, and gold nanoparticles were used to increase the yield of DNA for two plant pathogenic fungi including soil-borne fungus Rhizoctonia solani and toxigenic fungus Alternaria alternata. Gold nanoparticles combined with zinc and silver nanoparticles enhanced both DNA yield and PCR products compared to DNA extraction methods with ALB buffer, sodium dodecyl sulfate, ALBfree from protinase K, ZnNPs and AgNPs. Also, by using ZnNPs and AgNPs the DNA yield was enhanced and the sensitivity of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR products was increased. Application of nanomaterials in the PCR reaction could increase or decrease the PCR product according to the type of applied nanometal and the type of DNA template. Additions of AuNPs to PCR mix increased both sensitivity and specificity for PCR products of the tested fungi. Thus, the use of these highly stable, commercially available and inexpensive inorganic nano reagents open new opportunities for improving the specificity and sensitivity of PCR amplicon, which is the most important standard method in molecular plant pathology and mycotoxicology.
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Abstrakt

Cabbage seed weevil (Ceutorhynchus assimilis Payk.) is one of the most important and dangerous pests of oilseed rape in Poland and in other European countries. In contrast to another important oilseed rape insect pest – pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus F.), little is known about cabbage seed weevil susceptibility level to insecticide active ingredients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the cabbage seed weevil susceptibility to active ingredients from different insecticide groups. Research, carried out in 2015, 2016 and 2017 revealed very high susceptibility of the pest to organophosphates and all pyrethroid active ingredients, except for tau-fluvalinate, lower susceptibility to thiacloprid and very high resistance to indoxacarb from oxadiazines. This information is a basic element for creating integrated pest management strategies for oilseed rape in Poland.
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Abstrakt

Arbuscular mycorrizal (AM) fungi may enhance plant growth and polyphenol production, however, there have been limited studies on the relationships between root colonization of different fungal species and polyphenol production on cultivated Allium porrum (garden leek). The effects of inoculation of AM fungi spores from Rhizophagus intraradices, Giga -spora margarita, Glomus geosporum, Paraglomus occultum, Claroideoglomus claroideum, and Glomus species on colonization of garden leek roots and symbiotic changes in polyphenol production and plant growth were evaluated in greenhouse experiments. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) in colonization of leek roots by AM fungi species. The greatest level of root colonization was recorded on plants inoculated with R. intraradices (73%) and the lowest level on C. claroideum (3.2%). Significant differences (p < 0.05) in plant height were recorded between AM inoculated plants and the controls. Polyphenol levels differed significantly (p < 0.05) between garden leek plants inoculated with AM fungi and the non-inoculated controls. The percentage increases in polyphenol (a derivative of kaempferol) on garden leeks inoculated with G. geosporum relative to the untreated controls ranged from 28 to 1123%. Due to symbiosis with different AM species, other polyphenols decreased in some instances (negative values) and increased in others for values of up to 590%. Results showed that AM fungi species exhibited remarkable differences in polyphenol levels in garden leeks. The high polyphenol production by garden leek plants inoculated with G. geosporum, and Glomus species could be exploited for enhanced resistance of garden leeks to insects and diseases. This research highlights an understudied area, notably the relationships between AM fungal inoculations, root colonizations and polyphenol production in garden leeks. The findings can be utilized to improve pest resistance and the quality of garden leek plants.
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Abstrakt

Leguminous plant products have great nutritional and economic importance in the European Union, which is reflected by its protein policy. These harvested yields are risked by stored product pests, such as Acanthoscelides obtectus Say, which can cause up to 50–60% loss in stored bean items. The bean weevil causes both quantitative and qualitative damage to seeds. We aimed to map the qualitative damage of this devastating pest, which deteriorates the nutritional content of bean kernels. Furthermore, our purpose was to determine accurately the decrease in the volume and density alteration in beans caused by this important stored product pest using CT-assisted imaging analysis. Our results showed that the nutritional arrangement in damaged beans was caused by A. obtectus. The measured nutrient content increment in damaged samples can be explained by the presence of extraneous organic material which originates from perished specimens of the bruchin pest. This is a negative phenomenon in bean items used as forage, because of the loss of valuable proteins and rancidity in herbal oils. Weight loss triggered by developing larvae was 49.42% in examined bean items. The use of 3D technologies has greatly improved and facilitated the detailed investigation of injured seeds. The density (75,834 HU; 41.93%) and the volume (296.162 mm3; 26.21%) values measured by CT of the examined samples were significantly decreased. The decreasing of tissue density in damaged beans can be accounted for by the consumption of starch present at a high ratio and that of the dense reserve components in the cotyledons.
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Abstrakt

Protein digestion in insects relies on several groups of proteases, among which trypsin plays a prominent role. In the current study, larvae of Pieris brassicae L. were fed radish leaves treated with 1 mM concentrations of three specific inhibitors of trypsin: AEBSF.HCl [4-(2- -aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride, monohydrochloride], TLCK (N-a-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone) and SBTI (Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor) to find their potential effects on gene expression of trypsin. Initially, RT-PCR analysis revealed a gene of 748 bp responsible for synthesizing the digestive trypsin in P. brassicae larvae. Also, qRT-PCR data indicated a statistically greater expression of trypsin gene in the larvae fed 1 mM concentrations of AEBSF.HCl, TLCK and SBTI than the control. Results of the current study indicated that synthetic inhibitors can not only negatively affect the gene expression of P. brassicae trypsin, but also the insect can activate a compensatory mechanism against interruption of protein digestion by inducing more expression of the gene and producing more trypsin into the midgut lumen.
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Abstrakt

The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to control insect pests has already been established in various agronomic and forest crops. It is a bacterium that does not pollute the environment, is safe for mammals and vertebrates, lacks toxicity to plants and specifically targets insects. To date in-depth studies have not been conducted about the use of Bt to control the main pest of mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King) and other Meliaceae species, the Hypsipyla grandella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Therefore, this study aimed to test the pathogenicity of Bt strains on H. grandella caterpillars, as well to determine the lethal concentration required to kill 50% of the population (LC50) of the most promising strains. Ten strains of Bt toxic to lepidopteran proven in previous trials were used and these were incorporated into a natural diet with mahogany seeds to check their mortality. The LC50 of the top five strains was determined. The results indicate that H. grandella is highly susceptible to Bt toxins and the S1905 strain is highly toxic. Therefore, the use of Bt strains may be a tool to be incorporated into the integrated management of this important pest.
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Abstrakt

Effective control of Leptinotarsa decemlineata remains an urgent problem for agriculture worldwide. Minimization of the use of non-selective neonicotinoid insecticides, such as thiomethoxam, is an actual vector of development of potato cultivation. In this rapid communication, we show the prospect of the topical use of short unmodified antisense fragment of L. decemlineata CYP6B gene as a DNA insecticide. Investigated parameters, namely, number of larvae per plant, aboveground biomass, yield and number of potatoes produced per plant indicate the possibility of this post-genomic approach as a safe and effective method of L. decemlineata control.
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Redakcja

Editor-in-Chief Prof. Henryk Pospieszny Department of Virology and Bacteriology Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute Władysława Węgorka 20, 60-318 Poznań, Poland e-mail: H.Pospieszny@iorpib.poznan.pl Associate Editors Dr. Zbigniew Czaczyk (Agricultural Engineering) Poznan Univeristy of Life Sciences, Poznań, Poland Dr. Magdalena Jakubowska (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Sylwia Kaczmarek (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Piotr Kaczyński (Pesticide Residue) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Chetan Keswani (Biological Control) Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India Dr. Tomasz Klejdysz (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Franciszek Kornobis (Zoology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Karlos Lisboa (Biotechnology) Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Federal University of Alagoas, Alagoas, Brazil Dr. Vahid Mahdavi (Entomology) University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran Dr. Kinga Matysiak (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Yongzhi Wang (Virology and Bacteriology) Jilin Academy of Agricultral Sciences, Changchun, Jilin Province, China Dr. Przemysław Wieczorek (Biotechnology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Huan Zhang (Plant Pathology) Texas A&M University, Texas, USA Managing Editors Małgorzata Maćkowiak e-mail: m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl Monika Kardasz e-mail: m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl Proofreaders in English Delia Gosik Halina Staniszewska-Gorączniak Statistical Editor Dr. Jan Bocianowski Technical Editor Tomasz Adamski

Kontakt

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Institute of Plant Protection
National Research Institute
Władysława Węgorka 20
60–318 Poznań, Poland

tel.: +48 61 864 90 30
e-mail: office@plantprotection.pl

Managing Editors

Malgorzata Mackowiak
m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl

Monika Kardasz
m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl

Instrukcje dla autorów

Instructions for Authors

Manuscripts published in JPPR are free of charge. Only colour figures and photos are payed 61.5 € per one colour page JPPR publishes original research papers, short communications, critical reviews, and book reviews covering all areas of modern plant protection. Subjects include phytopathological virology, bacteriology, mycology and applied nematology and entomology as well as topics on protecting crop plants and stocks of crop products against diseases, viruses, weeds, etc. Submitted manuscripts should provide new facts or confirmatory data. All manuscripts should be written in high-quality English. Non-English native authors should seek appropriate help from English-writing professionals before submission. The manuscript should be submitted only via the JPPR Editorial System (http://www.editorialsystem.com/jppr). The authors must also remember to upload a scan of a completed License to Publish (point 4 and a handwritten signature are of particular importance). ALP form is available at the Editorial System. The day the manuscript reaches the editors for the first time is given upon publication as the date ‘received’ and the day the version, corrected by the authors is accepted by the reviewers, is given as the date ‘revised’. All papers are available free of charge at the Journal’s webpage (www.plantprotection.pl). However, colour figures and photos cost 61.5 € per one colour page.

General information for preparing a manuscript

All text should be written in a concise and integrated way, by focusing on major points, findings, breakthrough or discoveries, and their broad significance. All running text should be in Times New Roman 12, 1.5 spacing with all margins 2.5 cm on all sides.

Original article

The original research articles should contain the following sections: Title – the title should be unambiguous, understandable to specialists in other fields, and must reflect the contents of the paper. No abbreviations may be used in the title. Name(s) of author(s) with affiliations footnoted added only to the system, not visible in the manuscript (Double Blind Reviews). The names of the authors should be given in the following order: first name, second name initial, surname. Affiliations should contain: name of institution, faculty, department, street, city with zip code, and country. Abstract – information given in the title does not need to be repeated in the abstract. The abstract should be no longer than 300 words. It must contain the aim of the study, methods, results and conclusions. If used, abbreviations should be limited and must be explained when first used. Keywords – a maximum of 6, should cover the most specific terms found in the paper. They should describe the subject and results and must differ from words used in the title. Introduction – a brief review of relevant research (with references to the most important and recent publications) should lead to the clear formulation of the working hypothesis and aim of the study. It is recommended to indicate what is novel and important in the study. Materials and Methods – in this section the description of experimental procedures should be sufficient to allow replication. Organisms must be identified by scientific name, including authors. The International System of Units (SI) and their abbreviations should be used. Methods of statistical processing, including the software used, should also be listed in this section. Results – should be presented clearly and concisely without deducting and theori sing. Graphs should be preferred over tables to express quantitative data. Discussion – should contain an interpretation of the results ( without unnecessary repetition) and explain the influence of experimental factors or methods. It should describe how the results and their interpretation relate to the scientific hypothesis and/or aim of the study. The discussion should take into account the current state of knowledge and up-to-date literature. It should highlight the significance and novelty of the paper. It may also point to the next steps that will lead to a better understanding of the matters in question. Acknowledgements – of people, grants, funds, etc. should be placed in a separate section before the reference list. The names of funding organizations should be written in full. References In the text, papers with more than two authors should be cited by the last name of the first author, followed by et al. (et al. in italics), a space, and the year of publication (example: Smith et al. 2012). If the cited manuscript has two authors, the citation should include both last names, a space, and the publication year (example: Marconi and Johnston 2006). In the Reference section, a maximum of ten authors of the cited paper may be given. All references cited in the text must be listed in the Reference section alphabetically by the last names of the author(s) and then chronologically. The year of publication follows the authors’ names. All titles of the cited articles should be given in English. Please limit the citation of papers published in languages other than English. If necessary translate the title into English and provide information concerning the original language in brackets (e.g. in Spanish). The list of references should only include works from the last ten years that have had the greatest impact on the subject. Older references can be cited only if they are important for manuscript content. The full name of periodicals should be given. If possible, the DOI number should be added at the end of each reference. The following system for arranging references should be used: Journal articles Jorjani M., Heydari A., Zamanizadeh H.R., Rezaee S., Naraghi L., Zamzami P. 2012. Controlling sugar beet mortality disease by application of new bioformulations. Journal of Plant Protection Research 52 (3): 303-307. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/v10045-012-0049-9 Online articles Turner E., Jacobson D.J., Taylor J.W. 2011. Genetic architecture of a reinforced, postmating, reproductive isolation barrier between Neurospora species indicates evolution via natural selection. PLoS Genetics 7 (8): e1002204. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204 Books Bancrof J.D., Stevens A. 1996. Theory and Practice of Histological Techniques. 4th ed. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, UK, 776 pp. Book chapters Pradhan S.K. 2000. Integrated pest management. p. 463-469. In: "IPM System in Agriculture. Cash Crop" (R.K. Upadhyaya, K.G. Mukerji, O.P. Dubey, eds.). Aditya Books Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, India, 710 pp. Online documents Cartwright J. 2007. Big stars have weather too. IOP Publishing PhysicsWeb. Available on: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204

Tables, Figures, Phothographs, Drawings

Tables and figures should be uploaded as separated files at the submission stage. Their place in the manuscript should be clearly indicated by authors. Colour figures are accepted at no charge for the electronic version. In the hardcopy version of the journal, colour figures cost (65,5 € per one colour page). When attaching files please indicate if you want colour only in the online version or in both the online and the hardcopy. Photographs and RGB bitmaps should be provided in JPG or TIFF file format. They must have no less than 300 dpi resolution. The text column should be 8 cm wide and they must be at least 1000 pixels wide. Please send original (not resized) photograph(s), straight from a digital camera, without any text descriptions on the photo. Bitmaps combined with text object descriptions should be provided in MS Word or MS Powerpoint format. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Drawings should be provided in MS Word, MS Powerpoint, CorelDRAW or EPS file format and stored with original data file. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Charts (MS Excel graphs) should be provided in MS Excel file format, and stored with original MS Excel data file without captions but with the number of the figure attached. Please do not use bitmap fills for bar charts. Use colour fills only if necessary. Captions and legends should be added at the end of the text, referred to as "Fig." and numbered consecutively throughout the paper.

Rapid communications

Rapid communications should present brief observations which do not warrant the length of a full paper. However, they must present completed studies and follow the same scientific standards as original articles. Rapid communications should contain the following sections: Title Abstract - less than 300 words Key words - maximum 6 Text body Acknowledgements References The length of such submissions is limited to 1500 words for the text, one table, and one figure.

Reviews

Review articles are invited by the editors.Unsolicited reviews are also considered. The length is limited to 5000 words with no limitations on figures and tables and a maximum of 150 references. Mini-Review articles should be dedicated to "hot" topics and limited to 3000 words and a maximum two figures, two tables and 20 references.

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