Nauki Biologiczne i Rolnicze

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Zawartość

Journal of Plant Protection Research | 2006 | vol. 46 | No 1 |

Abstrakt

In vitro test of antagonistic activity of culture filtrates from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai and Trichoderma pseudo-koningii Rifai strains against post-harvest pathogens of some fruits were investigated. The undiluted culture filtrates of the two Trichoderma species completely inhibited germination of conidia/spores of all the rot pathogens, but 50% dilution showed varying degree of inhibition of spore germination. T. pseudo-koningii culture filtrate had a rather moderate to strong inhibitory effect on mycelia of the pathogenic fungi. The highest per cent inhibition of 45.6% of mycelial growth was recorded for Aspergillus niger Tiegh.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Chris Adegboyega Odebode

Abstrakt

A survey was conducted in February of 2004 on the outbreak of stem rot and wilt disease of pepper at the Kitabawa/Danzakara and Ajiwa irrigation sites in Northern Nigeria. Laboratory investigations revealed that it was elicited by Phytophthora capsici Leon. The disease caused severe loss in yield and USD 1 700.00 to USD 3 200.00 loss in revenue/ha. The disease was probably further aggravated by the presence of Fusarium sp. as well as ecto- and endoparasitic nematodes. Reasons for outbreak were elucidated and solutions proffered.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Matthew Alegbejo
Abdulahi Lawal
Paul Chindo
Olalekan Banwo

Abstrakt

The purpose of the present work was to estimate the effectiveness of grapefruit extract and Pythium oligandrum in protection of common bean, runner bean and pea from soil-borne pathogenic fungi. The investigated preparations were used for seed dressing and spraying plants at the beginning of anthesis. The results pointed out that the applied products considerably improved emergence, healthiness and yielding of the examined plant species. Besides, Biosept 33 SL showed a better effect than Polyversum. Independently on the species, the fewest plants, with the greatest proportion of infected ones and the smallest yield of seeds were obtained from the untreated control. Alternaria alternata, Fusarium spp., Pythium irregulare, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were frequently isolated from infected roots and stem bases as well as from seeds of bean and pea. Fusarium oxysporum tuned out to be dominant. The proportion of the above listed fungi in the treatments with Biosept 33 SL or Polyversum was smaller than in the control. At the same time, the role of those fungi in infecting the plants of common bean, runner bean and pea treated with Biosept 33 SL was only a little smaller than after using Polyversum.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Elżbieta Patkowska

Abstrakt

Plants under attack of herbivores can emit increased amounts of volatile compounds from their leaves. Similarly, mechanically-injured plants can emit volatile chemicals that differ both quantitatively and qualitatively from undamaged plants. In this experiment, mechanical injury increased the release of the secondary metabolites linalool (3,7-dimethyl-1,6-octadien-3-ol) and linalool oxide (5-ethenyltetrahydro-2-furanmethanol) by wheat plants. The amounts released varied significantly with injury type and the period of time after injury. The time interval for the volatile collection within the photophase also influenced the amount collected for each day. The increased emission of these compounds, as a result of injury, may be explained as a defense mechanism against wounding. The role of these plant volatiles can be further investigated in the context of plant response to mechanical injury, within the broader context of all types of injury.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Dariusz Piesik
David K. Weaver
Gavin E. Peck
Wendell L. Morrill

Abstrakt

Observations on the development of the horse chestnut leafminer on red horse chestnut (Aesculus x carnea H.) were carried out in Wrocław, Lower Silesia, Poland, in 2001–2003. Three generations of the pest were recorded to lay eggs on the red horse chestnut leaves. Although females of each generation deposited eggs abundantly, the hatching larvae died after a short period of feeding in the plant’s leaves and the species did not complete its development on this tree. Mostly L1 and L2 larvae were found inside the leaf mines. The observed leaf damage was, therefore, negligible.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Agnieszka Kukuła-Młynarczyk
Michał Hurej
Jacek Jackowski

Abstrakt

The research on impact of Cleonus piger Scop. (Coleoptera; Curculionidae) feeding and the occurrence of other pest insects on milk thistle plants grown in monoculture and crop rotation after cereals, with two different seeding dates was carried out in the years 2003–2005. The infestation and density of C. piger larvae in roots of plants grown in monoculture increased with subsequent developmental phases and subsequent years of the experiment. Feeding resulted in the decrease in crop yield by 40% compared to the crop rotation treatment. In crop rotation stands, the infestation of milk thistle roots by C. piger larvae was 4–5 times lower at the final phase than in monoculture. Postponing seeding by three weeks led to the decrease of infestation and density of C. piger larvae, but the crop yield was lower than that from the earlyseeded stands. No other phytophagous species of economic importance were found.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Jadwiga Andrzejewska
Robert Lamparski
Zbigniew Skinder

Abstrakt

The attractiveness of uncultivated (weedy) and cultivated strips (planted with a mixture of flowering plants) and the adjacent sugar beet crop to Carabidae was studied in 1999–2000 at the Experimental Research Station near Wrocław, Poland. Obtained results showed that greater plant abundance and their diversity on weedy strips had a positive effect on the number of carabid beetles. Also more carabid species were identified in uncultivated strips than in strips of mixture of Phacelia tanacetifolia, Coriandrum sativum and Sinapis alba. The lowest number of species was trapped in sugarbeet crop and bare soil. The most numerous species in all treatments were Pseudoophonus rufipes, Anchomenus dorsalis (Pont.), Poecilus cupres and the species of the Bembidion genera.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Jacek P. Twardowski
Michał Hurej
Teresa Jaworska

Abstrakt

The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of some different environmental conditions prevailing during the development and ripening of Echinochloa crus-galli diaspores on their germination. Some seeds were tested in the autumn the same year, whereas others were divided into two groups: dispersed seedsand seeds within the inflorescence. Then the seeds of both groups were buried. After eight-month stratification in the soil, the diaspores were tested under the same conditions as the samples examined in the autumn. The seeds tested in the spring germinated faster than those tested in the autumn. Also the germination capacity of barnyard grass caryopses examined in the summer was almost twofold higher than the germination capacity of those examined in the autumn. Both autumn and spring tests revealed that the harvest time affected germination. The seeds obtained in the second half of August and at the beginning of September (in the middle of the growing season) were characterized by a higher germination capacity than the caryopses collected at the beginning and the end of the reproduction period. The results show that the germination capacity and rate were not influenced by the place of origin, habitat conditions and accompanying plants. It was found in spring tests that germination depended on the kind of dissemination unit stored in the soil. After eight-month soil stratification, dispersed caryopses germinated by approx. 20% better than those stored with a part of the inflorescence.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Magdalena Kucewicz
Czesław Hołdyński
Ewa Gojło

Abstrakt

Measurements of spectral reflectance from potato plants were carried out in the years 2000 and 2001 using the field radiometer CE 313 of Cimel Electronique Company. Field experiments permitted to perceive differences in the reflectance of electromagnetic radiation from potato plant cultivars Bekas and Mila as well as differences between the plants treated with fungicides providing the protection against Phytophthora infestans and the untreated plants. A differentiation of the values of vegetative indices between potato cultivars resulted from the unequal development rate of the cultivars and from their different susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans. The assessment of potato plants infection by the studied pathogen using spectral measurements agreed with the results of field inspection.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Andrzej Wójtowicz
Marek Wójtowicz

Abstrakt

Fusarium avenaceum, F. oxysporum, Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Rhizoctonia solani, Mucor sp., Aspergillus niger, Penicillium spp. were the most often isolated species from fiber seeds. The antagonistic action of Trichoderma lignorum T 13–82 in relation to seed contaminants was evaluated. The use of Trichodermin-BL, based on that antagonist, applied as pre-sowing seed treatment and on growing plants decrease diseases incidence. The application of Trichodermin-BL improved a set of biometrical and physiological parameters during crop vegetation, increased the yield and raised flax fiber quality.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Lyudmila Pristchepa
Dmitry Voitka
Evgeniya Kasperovich
Natalya Stepanova

Abstrakt

From Hedera helix and Epipremnum aureum showing necrosis of shoot base spread upwards and on leaves Phytophthora tropicalil was isolated. The species was obtained from ⅞of Hedera and ¾ of Epipremnum diseased shoot and root parts. Additionally, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium avenaceum and Rhizoctonia solani was recovered from some of affected plants. The chosen 2 isolates colonised petioles and leaf blades of both host plants. P. tropicalis caused necrosis of leaves of 11 tested cultivars of H. helix and 13 other pot plant species and seedlings of tomato. The fastest spread of necrosis was observed on leaves of Peperomia magnoliaefolia, Pelargonium zonale and Phalaenopsis x hybridum. The development of disease was observed at temperatures ranged from 10 to 32.5°C with optimum 30°C.

Przejdź do artykułu

Autorzy i Afiliacje

Leszek B. Orlikowski
Aleksandra Trzewik
Katarzyna Wiejacha
Grażyna Szkuta

Redakcja

Editor-in-Chief Prof. Henryk Pospieszny Department of Virology and Bacteriology Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute Władysława Węgorka 20, 60-318 Poznań, Poland e-mail: H.Pospieszny@iorpib.poznan.pl Associate Editors Dr. Zbigniew Czaczyk (Agricultural Engineering) Poznan Univeristy of Life Sciences, Poznań, Poland Dr. Magdalena Jakubowska (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Sylwia Kaczmarek (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Piotr Kaczyński (Pesticide Residue) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Chetan Keswani (Biological Control) Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India Dr. Tomasz Klejdysz (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Franciszek Kornobis (Zoology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Karlos Lisboa (Biotechnology) Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Federal University of Alagoas, Alagoas, Brazil Dr. Vahid Mahdavi (Entomology) University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran Dr. Kinga Matysiak (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Yongzhi Wang (Virology and Bacteriology) Jilin Academy of Agricultral Sciences, Changchun, Jilin Province, China Dr. Przemysław Wieczorek (Biotechnology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Huan Zhang (Plant Pathology) Texas A&M University, Texas, USA Managing Editors Małgorzata Maćkowiak e-mail: m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl Monika Kardasz e-mail: m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl Proofreaders in English Delia Gosik Halina Staniszewska-Gorączniak Statistical Editor Dr. Jan Bocianowski Technical Editor Tomasz Adamski

Kontakt

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Institute of Plant Protection
National Research Institute
Władysława Węgorka 20
60–318 Poznań, Poland

tel.: +48 61 864 90 30
e-mail: office@plantprotection.pl

Managing Editors

Malgorzata Mackowiak
m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl

Monika Kardasz
m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl

Instrukcje dla autorów

Instructions for Authors

Manuscripts published in JPPR are free of charge. Only colour figures and photos are payed 61.5 € per one colour page JPPR publishes original research papers, short communications, critical reviews, and book reviews covering all areas of modern plant protection. Subjects include phytopathological virology, bacteriology, mycology and applied nematology and entomology as well as topics on protecting crop plants and stocks of crop products against diseases, viruses, weeds, etc. Submitted manuscripts should provide new facts or confirmatory data. All manuscripts should be written in high-quality English. Non-English native authors should seek appropriate help from English-writing professionals before submission. The manuscript should be submitted only via the JPPR Editorial System (http://www.editorialsystem.com/jppr). The authors must also remember to upload a scan of a completed License to Publish (point 4 and a handwritten signature are of particular importance). ALP form is available at the Editorial System. The day the manuscript reaches the editors for the first time is given upon publication as the date ‘received’ and the day the version, corrected by the authors is accepted by the reviewers, is given as the date ‘revised’. All papers are available free of charge at the Journal’s webpage (www.plantprotection.pl). However, colour figures and photos cost 61.5 € per one colour page.

General information for preparing a manuscript

All text should be written in a concise and integrated way, by focusing on major points, findings, breakthrough or discoveries, and their broad significance. All running text should be in Times New Roman 12, 1.5 spacing with all margins 2.5 cm on all sides.

Original article

The original research articles should contain the following sections: Title – the title should be unambiguous, understandable to specialists in other fields, and must reflect the contents of the paper. No abbreviations may be used in the title. Name(s) of author(s) with affiliations footnoted added only to the system, not visible in the manuscript (Double Blind Reviews). The names of the authors should be given in the following order: first name, second name initial, surname. Affiliations should contain: name of institution, faculty, department, street, city with zip code, and country. Abstract – information given in the title does not need to be repeated in the abstract. The abstract should be no longer than 300 words. It must contain the aim of the study, methods, results and conclusions. If used, abbreviations should be limited and must be explained when first used. Keywords – a maximum of 6, should cover the most specific terms found in the paper. They should describe the subject and results and must differ from words used in the title. Introduction – a brief review of relevant research (with references to the most important and recent publications) should lead to the clear formulation of the working hypothesis and aim of the study. It is recommended to indicate what is novel and important in the study. Materials and Methods – in this section the description of experimental procedures should be sufficient to allow replication. Organisms must be identified by scientific name, including authors. The International System of Units (SI) and their abbreviations should be used. Methods of statistical processing, including the software used, should also be listed in this section. Results – should be presented clearly and concisely without deducting and theori sing. Graphs should be preferred over tables to express quantitative data. Discussion – should contain an interpretation of the results ( without unnecessary repetition) and explain the influence of experimental factors or methods. It should describe how the results and their interpretation relate to the scientific hypothesis and/or aim of the study. The discussion should take into account the current state of knowledge and up-to-date literature. It should highlight the significance and novelty of the paper. It may also point to the next steps that will lead to a better understanding of the matters in question. Acknowledgements – of people, grants, funds, etc. should be placed in a separate section before the reference list. The names of funding organizations should be written in full. References In the text, papers with more than two authors should be cited by the last name of the first author, followed by et al. (et al. in italics), a space, and the year of publication (example: Smith et al. 2012). If the cited manuscript has two authors, the citation should include both last names, a space, and the publication year (example: Marconi and Johnston 2006). In the Reference section, a maximum of ten authors of the cited paper may be given. All references cited in the text must be listed in the Reference section alphabetically by the last names of the author(s) and then chronologically. The year of publication follows the authors’ names. All titles of the cited articles should be given in English. Please limit the citation of papers published in languages other than English. If necessary translate the title into English and provide information concerning the original language in brackets (e.g. in Spanish). The list of references should only include works from the last ten years that have had the greatest impact on the subject. Older references can be cited only if they are important for manuscript content. The full name of periodicals should be given. If possible, the DOI number should be added at the end of each reference. The following system for arranging references should be used: Journal articles Jorjani M., Heydari A., Zamanizadeh H.R., Rezaee S., Naraghi L., Zamzami P. 2012. Controlling sugar beet mortality disease by application of new bioformulations. Journal of Plant Protection Research 52 (3): 303-307. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/v10045-012-0049-9 Online articles Turner E., Jacobson D.J., Taylor J.W. 2011. Genetic architecture of a reinforced, postmating, reproductive isolation barrier between Neurospora species indicates evolution via natural selection. PLoS Genetics 7 (8): e1002204. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204 Books Bancrof J.D., Stevens A. 1996. Theory and Practice of Histological Techniques. 4th ed. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, UK, 776 pp. Book chapters Pradhan S.K. 2000. Integrated pest management. p. 463-469. In: "IPM System in Agriculture. Cash Crop" (R.K. Upadhyaya, K.G. Mukerji, O.P. Dubey, eds.). Aditya Books Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, India, 710 pp. Online documents Cartwright J. 2007. Big stars have weather too. IOP Publishing PhysicsWeb. Available on: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204

Tables, Figures, Phothographs, Drawings

Tables and figures should be uploaded as separated files at the submission stage. Their place in the manuscript should be clearly indicated by authors. Colour figures are accepted at no charge for the electronic version. In the hardcopy version of the journal, colour figures cost (65,5 € per one colour page). When attaching files please indicate if you want colour only in the online version or in both the online and the hardcopy. Photographs and RGB bitmaps should be provided in JPG or TIFF file format. They must have no less than 300 dpi resolution. The text column should be 8 cm wide and they must be at least 1000 pixels wide. Please send original (not resized) photograph(s), straight from a digital camera, without any text descriptions on the photo. Bitmaps combined with text object descriptions should be provided in MS Word or MS Powerpoint format. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Drawings should be provided in MS Word, MS Powerpoint, CorelDRAW or EPS file format and stored with original data file. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Charts (MS Excel graphs) should be provided in MS Excel file format, and stored with original MS Excel data file without captions but with the number of the figure attached. Please do not use bitmap fills for bar charts. Use colour fills only if necessary. Captions and legends should be added at the end of the text, referred to as "Fig." and numbered consecutively throughout the paper.

Rapid communications

Rapid communications should present brief observations which do not warrant the length of a full paper. However, they must present completed studies and follow the same scientific standards as original articles. Rapid communications should contain the following sections: Title Abstract - less than 300 words Key words - maximum 6 Text body Acknowledgements References The length of such submissions is limited to 1500 words for the text, one table, and one figure.

Reviews

Review articles are invited by the editors.Unsolicited reviews are also considered. The length is limited to 5000 words with no limitations on figures and tables and a maximum of 150 references. Mini-Review articles should be dedicated to "hot" topics and limited to 3000 words and a maximum two figures, two tables and 20 references.

Ta strona wykorzystuje pliki 'cookies'. Więcej informacji