Nauki Biologiczne i Rolnicze

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Zawartość

Journal of Plant Protection Research | 2006 | vol. 46 | No 3 |

Abstrakt

Sixteen tomato cultivars obtained from the collections of the Institute for Agricultural Research (IAR) Samaru, Nigeria were screened for resistance to local strains of Tomato leaf curl virus at Samaru, Northern Guinea Savanna, over a two year period, 1998/1999 and 1999/2000 dry seasons. Five cultivars were moderately resistant, nine were moderately susceptible, while two were highly susceptible. Most of the cultivars were high yielding (46–55 t/ha) and had good fruit size (4.8–6.0 cm x 2.8–4.1 cm). They will be further evaluated on-farm at different locations after which they will be introduced to farmers to replace the low yielding and TLCV-susceptible cultivars currently in use in most parts of the Savanna ecological zones of the country.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Mathew Alegbejo
Olalekan Banwo

Abstrakt

The effect of crude extracts of neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf, neem seed and garlic (Allium sativum) at concentrations ranging from 5% to 30% of the material in 100 ml of Potato Dextrose Agar on mycelial growth of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici was assessed. All the extracts inhibited mycellial growth at various levels. Dry neem seed extract gavel 100% inhibition of mycelial growth. Fresh neem leaf extract reduced mycelial growth with increasing concentration while in garlic there were no differences in growth inhibition among the various concentrations used. However garlic extracts decreased sporulation with increasing concentration and cultures grown on extract amended agar plates remained viable.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Ogechi N. Agbenin
P.S. Marley

Abstrakt

Powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei is one of the most important diseases of barley in Poland. B. graminis is a genetically diverse pathogen with different special forms and races. The aim of the two-years’ experiment was to assess of B. gramins f. sp. hordei virulence frequency and powdery mildew occurrence on four winter barley cultivars. Virulence frequency of the pathogen depended on place and term of exposition. The occurrence of powdery mildew on four winter barley cultivars depended on virulence frequency of the pathogen and weather conditions.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Anna Tratwal
Zbigniew Weber

Abstrakt

Vegetables in addition to arable crops and ornamentals are also at high risk from slug and snail attack at all growth stages. The no-choice tests were conducted under laboratory conditions to assess the harmfulness of the slug Arion rufus (Linnaeus) and the snail Cepaea hortensis (Müller) to young vegetable plants. Ten species representing leaf and root vegetables, allium, brassica, cucurbit and edible pulse plants were chosen to compare their susceptibilities to feeding of these pests (agrotechnical classification – Polish National List of Varieties of Agricultural and Vegetable Plants 2005). The evaluation of the growth of the tested vegetables included a percentage of the damaged plant area and changes in aboveground plant mass. The trend toward increase of mass was defined by the means of regression analysis. Losses of aboveground plant mass resulting from pest feeding and plant growth restraint caused by the slug or the snail damage were assessed. Variance analysis of the general linear model and orthogonal contrasts were calculated to compare the vegetable groups included in the research. The highest losses of aboveground plant mass, by both pest species A. rufus and C. hortensis, were on common bean plants and the smallest on plants of leaf vegetables (lettuce, dill), brassica plants (cauliflower, white cabbage) and allium plants (garden onion).

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Jan Kozłowski
Monika Zielińska
Agnieszka Pawłowska
Maria Kozłowska

Abstrakt

Influence of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (E.F. Smith) Snyder and Hansen on 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) production in the rhizosphere of banana cultivar Rasthali by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The purified extracts of Pfm strain of P. fluorescens isolated from banana rhizosphere inhibited the growth and spore germination of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense under laboratory conditions. DAPG extracted from the cultures of the strain was observed as distinct spots in thin layer chromatographic plates at Rf value of 0.88. The extracts of soil inoculated with P. fluorescens and challenge inoculated with F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense eluted at retention time ranges from 20.00 min to 21.30 min. The quantity of DPAG production was less in the extracts of soil inoculated with P. fluorescens and challenge inoculated with F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense as compared to P. fluorescens alone inoculated soil. The talc formulation of Pfm strain also reduced vascular discolouration due to the pathogen in banana plants when inoculated at 15 g/plant.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Thangavelu Saravanan
Mari Muthusamy

Abstrakt

The experiment was conducted in the years 2001–2003 at the Experimental Station in Złotniki. The aim of the performed investigations was to evaluate economic effectiveness of different fungicidal protection programs in winter wheat. Winter wheat of cv. Sakwa was cultivated using the following two variants of seed treatment: 1) Raxil 060 FS at the dose of 60 ml/100 kg grain, 2) Raxil 060 FS + Latitude 125 FS at the doses of 60 and 200 ml/100 kg, and five variants of fungicidal foliar protection: 1) Vista 228 SE, 2) Sportak Alpha 380 EC, 3) Sportak Alpha 380 EC + Vista 228 SE, 4) Sportak Alpha 380 EC + Vista 228 SE + Juwel 250 SC, 5) control – without protection. The use of the above plant protection products contributed to the increase of winter wheat grain yield from 0.60 t/ha to 2.07 t/ha. This increase of yield covered costs of performed chemical control. The economic analysis showed that most effective variant of winter wheat chemical protection was seed treatment with Latitude 125 FS with additional two foliar treatments with the following fungicides: Sportak Alpha 380 EC and Vista 228 SE. Irrespective of the applied seed dressing, additional application of Juwel 250 SC at the stage of early milk maturity turned out to be economically not justified.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Zuzanna Sawinska
Irena Małecka

Abstrakt

The effect of biopreparation Biochikol 020 PC on linear growth of mycelia of two Rhizoctonia isolates was tested under laboratory conditions along with that of fungicide Baytan Universal 19,5 WS for comparative purposes. Complete retardation of mycelial growth of both isolates was observed in case the application of fungicide Baytan Universal 19,5 WS at the concentration of 0.1% and a considerable growth inhibition was stated at the temperatures of 10°C and 30°C. The effect of seed dressing with the above mentioned preparations on plant infestation by Rhizoctonia fungi was tested in a greenhouse experiment on two cultivars of spring wheat: Banti and Ismena. Baytan Universal 19,5 WS reduced plant infestation especially at the highest soil moisture content of 20 kPa. Biopreparation Biochikol 020 PC and diversification of soil moisture levels did not result in a reduction of wheat infestation rate. This biopreparation stimulated the increase of root mass of both cultivars at moisture content of 20 kPa.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Ewa Żółtańska

Abstrakt

The third record of Cinara tujafilina occurrence in Poland is given. The population dynamics of the species is presented.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Roma Durak
Grażyna Soika
Marzena Socha

Abstrakt

In 1993–1997, 990 pupae of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.) were collected from nine different varieties of Brasica oleracea L., grown on experimental farm near Kraków. Only 234 moths (23.6%) were recovered from the cocoons. The most important factor reducing the population of DBM was parasitization (65.1%). It varied between the years of observation and oscillated from 60% to 90.3%. Sixhundred and fourty four specimens of parasitic wasps belonging to 11 species from families: Ichneumonidae (5 species), Braconidae (3 species), Pteromalidae (2 species) and Eulophidae (1 species) were reared out. In each year of observations the most abundant species among DBM parasitoids was Diadegma fenestralis Holmgr. as it constituted 71.4% of all of the wasps reared. In the years 1994 and 1996 with low abundance of diamondback moth, D. fenestralis was the only species parasitizing 66.7% and 89.5% of the pest larvae.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Beata Jankowska
Kazimierz Wiech

Abstrakt

The efficacy of some plant extracts on the control of potato tuber soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora was evaluated in the laboratory conditions. Neem leaf and seed aqueous extracts significantly reduced the incidence and severity of tuber soft rot, while ironweed and Siamese cassia aqueous leaf extracts gave moderate control of the disease. Tuber treatment with river redgum aqueous leaf extract did not control tuber soft rot.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Bulus S. Bdliya
Bashir Dahiru

Abstrakt

Field surveys were performed in winter and spring rape crops of agricultural companies and individual farmers during the period of 2001–2003. A questionnaire was completed for each experimental field, giving a description of the crop. The incidence and severity of fungal diseases were estimated annually in 14–18 winter and spring rape crops. Seed samples were taken from each field and composition fungal communities on harvested seed was estimated. Alternaria blight and Phoma stem canker were present on stems of all investigated winter and spring rape cultivars and Alternaria blight occurred on siliques in all experimental years. In 2001, most favourable year for spread of diseases, Alternaria blight damaged 87.2 100% of winter rape and 100% of spring rape siliques, maximum disease severity was 6.66 and 7.24%, respectively. All cultivars of winter and spring rape were susceptible to Alternaria blight. Phoma stem canker was more often found on stems of spring oilseed rape – up to 98% of stems with symptoms of Phoma stem canker. Seed fungal infection level was 10.0–100% in winter rape and 16.0–93.6% in spring rape seed samples. The most frequent fungi on seeds of winter and spring oilseed rape were Alternaria spp. and Cladosporium spp.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Irena Brazauskiene
Egle Petraitiene

Redakcja

Editor-in-Chief Prof. Henryk Pospieszny Department of Virology and Bacteriology Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute Władysława Węgorka 20, 60-318 Poznań, Poland e-mail: H.Pospieszny@iorpib.poznan.pl Associate Editors Dr. Zbigniew Czaczyk (Agricultural Engineering) Poznan Univeristy of Life Sciences, Poznań, Poland Dr. Magdalena Jakubowska (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Sylwia Kaczmarek (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Piotr Kaczyński (Pesticide Residue) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Chetan Keswani (Biological Control) Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India Dr. Tomasz Klejdysz (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Franciszek Kornobis (Zoology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Karlos Lisboa (Biotechnology) Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Federal University of Alagoas, Alagoas, Brazil Dr. Vahid Mahdavi (Entomology) University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran Dr. Kinga Matysiak (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Yongzhi Wang (Virology and Bacteriology) Jilin Academy of Agricultral Sciences, Changchun, Jilin Province, China Dr. Przemysław Wieczorek (Biotechnology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Huan Zhang (Plant Pathology) Texas A&M University, Texas, USA Managing Editors Małgorzata Maćkowiak e-mail: m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl Monika Kardasz e-mail: m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl Proofreaders in English Delia Gosik Halina Staniszewska-Gorączniak Statistical Editor Dr. Jan Bocianowski Technical Editor Tomasz Adamski

Kontakt

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Institute of Plant Protection
National Research Institute
Władysława Węgorka 20
60–318 Poznań, Poland

tel.: +48 61 864 90 30
e-mail: office@plantprotection.pl

Managing Editors

Malgorzata Mackowiak
m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl

Monika Kardasz
m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl

Instrukcje dla autorów

Instructions for Authors

Manuscripts published in JPPR are free of charge. Only colour figures and photos are payed 61.5 € per one colour page JPPR publishes original research papers, short communications, critical reviews, and book reviews covering all areas of modern plant protection. Subjects include phytopathological virology, bacteriology, mycology and applied nematology and entomology as well as topics on protecting crop plants and stocks of crop products against diseases, viruses, weeds, etc. Submitted manuscripts should provide new facts or confirmatory data. All manuscripts should be written in high-quality English. Non-English native authors should seek appropriate help from English-writing professionals before submission. The manuscript should be submitted only via the JPPR Editorial System (http://www.editorialsystem.com/jppr). The authors must also remember to upload a scan of a completed License to Publish (point 4 and a handwritten signature are of particular importance). ALP form is available at the Editorial System. The day the manuscript reaches the editors for the first time is given upon publication as the date ‘received’ and the day the version, corrected by the authors is accepted by the reviewers, is given as the date ‘revised’. All papers are available free of charge at the Journal’s webpage (www.plantprotection.pl). However, colour figures and photos cost 61.5 € per one colour page.

General information for preparing a manuscript

All text should be written in a concise and integrated way, by focusing on major points, findings, breakthrough or discoveries, and their broad significance. All running text should be in Times New Roman 12, 1.5 spacing with all margins 2.5 cm on all sides.

Original article

The original research articles should contain the following sections: Title – the title should be unambiguous, understandable to specialists in other fields, and must reflect the contents of the paper. No abbreviations may be used in the title. Name(s) of author(s) with affiliations footnoted added only to the system, not visible in the manuscript (Double Blind Reviews). The names of the authors should be given in the following order: first name, second name initial, surname. Affiliations should contain: name of institution, faculty, department, street, city with zip code, and country. Abstract – information given in the title does not need to be repeated in the abstract. The abstract should be no longer than 300 words. It must contain the aim of the study, methods, results and conclusions. If used, abbreviations should be limited and must be explained when first used. Keywords – a maximum of 6, should cover the most specific terms found in the paper. They should describe the subject and results and must differ from words used in the title. Introduction – a brief review of relevant research (with references to the most important and recent publications) should lead to the clear formulation of the working hypothesis and aim of the study. It is recommended to indicate what is novel and important in the study. Materials and Methods – in this section the description of experimental procedures should be sufficient to allow replication. Organisms must be identified by scientific name, including authors. The International System of Units (SI) and their abbreviations should be used. Methods of statistical processing, including the software used, should also be listed in this section. Results – should be presented clearly and concisely without deducting and theori sing. Graphs should be preferred over tables to express quantitative data. Discussion – should contain an interpretation of the results ( without unnecessary repetition) and explain the influence of experimental factors or methods. It should describe how the results and their interpretation relate to the scientific hypothesis and/or aim of the study. The discussion should take into account the current state of knowledge and up-to-date literature. It should highlight the significance and novelty of the paper. It may also point to the next steps that will lead to a better understanding of the matters in question. Acknowledgements – of people, grants, funds, etc. should be placed in a separate section before the reference list. The names of funding organizations should be written in full. References In the text, papers with more than two authors should be cited by the last name of the first author, followed by et al. (et al. in italics), a space, and the year of publication (example: Smith et al. 2012). If the cited manuscript has two authors, the citation should include both last names, a space, and the publication year (example: Marconi and Johnston 2006). In the Reference section, a maximum of ten authors of the cited paper may be given. All references cited in the text must be listed in the Reference section alphabetically by the last names of the author(s) and then chronologically. The year of publication follows the authors’ names. All titles of the cited articles should be given in English. Please limit the citation of papers published in languages other than English. If necessary translate the title into English and provide information concerning the original language in brackets (e.g. in Spanish). The list of references should only include works from the last ten years that have had the greatest impact on the subject. Older references can be cited only if they are important for manuscript content. The full name of periodicals should be given. If possible, the DOI number should be added at the end of each reference. The following system for arranging references should be used: Journal articles Jorjani M., Heydari A., Zamanizadeh H.R., Rezaee S., Naraghi L., Zamzami P. 2012. Controlling sugar beet mortality disease by application of new bioformulations. Journal of Plant Protection Research 52 (3): 303-307. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/v10045-012-0049-9 Online articles Turner E., Jacobson D.J., Taylor J.W. 2011. Genetic architecture of a reinforced, postmating, reproductive isolation barrier between Neurospora species indicates evolution via natural selection. PLoS Genetics 7 (8): e1002204. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204 Books Bancrof J.D., Stevens A. 1996. Theory and Practice of Histological Techniques. 4th ed. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, UK, 776 pp. Book chapters Pradhan S.K. 2000. Integrated pest management. p. 463-469. In: "IPM System in Agriculture. Cash Crop" (R.K. Upadhyaya, K.G. Mukerji, O.P. Dubey, eds.). Aditya Books Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, India, 710 pp. Online documents Cartwright J. 2007. Big stars have weather too. IOP Publishing PhysicsWeb. Available on: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204

Tables, Figures, Phothographs, Drawings

Tables and figures should be uploaded as separated files at the submission stage. Their place in the manuscript should be clearly indicated by authors. Colour figures are accepted at no charge for the electronic version. In the hardcopy version of the journal, colour figures cost (65,5 € per one colour page). When attaching files please indicate if you want colour only in the online version or in both the online and the hardcopy. Photographs and RGB bitmaps should be provided in JPG or TIFF file format. They must have no less than 300 dpi resolution. The text column should be 8 cm wide and they must be at least 1000 pixels wide. Please send original (not resized) photograph(s), straight from a digital camera, without any text descriptions on the photo. Bitmaps combined with text object descriptions should be provided in MS Word or MS Powerpoint format. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Drawings should be provided in MS Word, MS Powerpoint, CorelDRAW or EPS file format and stored with original data file. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Charts (MS Excel graphs) should be provided in MS Excel file format, and stored with original MS Excel data file without captions but with the number of the figure attached. Please do not use bitmap fills for bar charts. Use colour fills only if necessary. Captions and legends should be added at the end of the text, referred to as "Fig." and numbered consecutively throughout the paper.

Rapid communications

Rapid communications should present brief observations which do not warrant the length of a full paper. However, they must present completed studies and follow the same scientific standards as original articles. Rapid communications should contain the following sections: Title Abstract - less than 300 words Key words - maximum 6 Text body Acknowledgements References The length of such submissions is limited to 1500 words for the text, one table, and one figure.

Reviews

Review articles are invited by the editors.Unsolicited reviews are also considered. The length is limited to 5000 words with no limitations on figures and tables and a maximum of 150 references. Mini-Review articles should be dedicated to "hot" topics and limited to 3000 words and a maximum two figures, two tables and 20 references.

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