Life Sciences and Agriculture

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Content

Journal of Plant Protection Research | 2005 | vol. 45 | No 2 |

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Abstract

The studies were carried out in Wielkopolska region (western Poland) in oat and winter rye cultures. Density and species structure of Thysanoptera were studied. Average density of adult Thysanoptera on oat reached 371.4 individuals/m2, and was higher than on rye, where it reached 107.5 individuals/m2. Limothrips cerealium Haliday was a dominant species on oat as well as on winter rye.

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Authors and Affiliations

Danuta Szeflińska
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Abstract

In four years’ experiment the infestation of hazel nuts by hazelnut weevil was investigated. Significant differences in resistance of different hazelnut cultivars were found. Olbrzymi z Halle cultivar exhibited a moderate resistance to the pest and was classified to the III class, while other cultivars showed a moderate susceptibility to the pest and were classified to class IV.

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Authors and Affiliations

Elżbieta Wojciechowicz-Żytko
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Abstract

Terrain and laboratory research were conducted to determine the potential of Gastroidea viridula Deg. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to control mossy sorrel (Rumex confertus Willd.). In a field study, the dynamicof plant biomass and number of larvae occurring on that plant were investigated. The Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient of biomass increase in time equalled, to r = 0.96. The regression equation showed, that the plant daily growth reached 29 g; and 210 g per week, consequently. In the laboratory, weight of consumed food by larvae, and larval body weight were measured at 20°C. First generation of G. viridula was taken into consideration. Total weight of consumed leaves by all three instars of a single larva, during 50 days of the development amounted to 1.243 g. Also seasonal abundance of larvae was observed. On May 25th the highest observed number of G. viridula larvae per plant ranged from 435 to 469 individuals. This species may be of usefulness in biological control of mossy sorrel.

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Authors and Affiliations

Dariusz Piesik
Anna Wenda-Piesik
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Abstract

The aim of performed research was to evaluate weed seedbank in soil under the influence of four different winter wheat tillage systems. Winter wheat was grown in the following cultivation systems: A – monoculture with direct drilling into white clover mulch; B – monoculture with direct drilling into wheat stubble; C – monoculture with conventional tillage; D – crop rotation with conventional tillage. It was shown that pre-sowing wheat tillage had a more considerable effect on weed species and weed seedbank in soil than type of crop rotation. The least seedbank was observed when plough system was replaced by direct drilling. In the soil layer of 0–20 cm, under wheat no-plough tillage, 20.3% less weed diaspores wasfound compared to monoculture with plough tillage and by 40.1% lessthan in crop rotation. The plough tillage increased amount of weed diaspores in the whole plough layer, while direct drilling increased it only in 0–1 cm of soil layer. After direct drilling of wheat into stubble (B) the number of weed diaspores in 1 dcm3 of soil in 0–1 cm layer was over twofold higher than in direct sowing in mulch (A), and threefold higher than in crop rotation (D) and almost six times higher than in wheat monoculture with conventional tillage (C). Dominating weed species in the soil over the types of wheat cultivation systems were: Chenopodium album L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., Apera spica-venti L., Lamium purpureum L., and Viola arvensis Murr.

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Authors and Affiliations

Wiesław Wojciechowski
Józef Sowiński
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Abstract

Intensive surveys conducted at Samaru and its environs in the northern Guinea Savanna of Nigeria between October 2000 and September 2002, indicated that Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) infests forty two (thirty three cultivated and seven wild) species of plants. Twenty nine of the plants were found in upland, two in the lowland and eleven in both upland and lowland (fadama) areas. Heavily infested plants were distorted, chlorotic and stunted. Symptoms of virus infection were associated with some of the infested plants. This is the first comprehensive report of hosts of B. tabaci in Nigeria.

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Authors and Affiliations

Matthew D. Alegbejo
Olalekan O. Banwo
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Abstract

Some aspects of the epidemiology of Maize streak virus (MSV) genus Mastrevirus concerning virus incidence, vector populations and some environmental factors were investigated in field experiments conducted over a three year period (2000–2002) at Samaru, northern Nigeria. Significant positive correlations were obtained between number of leafhoppers caught and MSV incidence and age of plant at infection and also with temperature. Also significant negative correlations were obtained between MSV incidence and mean relative humidity; between number of leafhoppers and age of plants and with mean rainfall. Leafhopper vectors caught included Cicadulina arachidis China, C. mbila Naude, C. triangula Ruppel and C. similis China, in order of abundance. Leafhopper incidence was highest in the months of September and October.

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Authors and Affiliations

Matthew D. Alegbejo
Olalekan O. Banwo
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Abstract

The research into the occurrence of herbivorous heteroptera of Orthops genus on Sosnowski’s hogweed (Heracleum sosnowskyi Manden.) was carried out over 1999–2002 in the vicinity of Bydgoszcz. The analysis of the faunistic material collected of Heteroptera order showed the occurrence of 3 species where dominant heteroptera were represented by: Orthops campestris L. (48.57%) and Orthops kalmi L.(44.91%), while Orthops basalis Costa was scarce. The maximum abundance of these species coincided with full flowering and the beginning of hogweed fruit formation.

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Authors and Affiliations

Danuta Wrzesińska
Maria Wawrzyniak
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Abstract

Water extractsfrom selected Geraniaceae plants, to which paraffin oil was added as adjuvant, were tested. It was observed that the plant extracts researched limited Colorado potato beetle feeding and development and adding adjuvant increased the effects. The highest antifeedant activity towards Colorado potato beetlesand their larvae wasobs erved in extractsobtained from Pelargonium × hortorum Bailey and Geranium pusillum L. The extract from Pelargonium × hortorum Bailey added to food showed a negative effect on the development of female reproductive organs and embryo development and showed the highest effectiveness in field conditions.

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Authors and Affiliations

Robert Lamparski
Maria Wawrzyniak
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Abstract

The influence of bean seed surface lipids on infestation of seeds by Acanthoscelides obtectus Say was investigated. The experiments were performed in dual-choice bioassays on three bean varieties: Blanka, Bor and Longina. The collected data for natural and solvent washed seeds concerned the number of ovipositions, embryo mortality, lack of seed-boring activity, dead larvae inside seeds and developed insects. The results clearly indicated that bean seed surface lipids are involved in all infestation stages, and could be used to distinguish resistant and non-resistant varieties of been. Chemical analyses revealed the following groups of surface lipids: wax esters, long chain primary alcohols, n-alkanes, sterols, fatty acids, squalene, aldehydes, monoacylglycerols, ketones and fatty acid esters. Quantitative composition of surface lipids was analysed using selected chemometric procedures to determine correlation with bioactivity. Cluster analysis of surface lipid composition enabled to distinguish resistant and non-resistant varieties. Fatty acids and monoacylglycerols were found to deter bean weevil infestation, while alkan-1-ols acted as attractants.

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Authors and Affiliations

Mariusz Nietupski
Beata Szafranek
Dolores Ciepielewska
Elżbieta Synak
Łucja Fornal
Janusz Szafranek

Editorial office

Editor-in-Chief Prof. Henryk Pospieszny Department of Virology and Bacteriology Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute Władysława Węgorka 20, 60-318 Poznań, Poland e-mail: H.Pospieszny@iorpib.poznan.pl Associate Editors Dr. Zbigniew Czaczyk (Agricultural Engineering) Poznan Univeristy of Life Sciences, Poznań, Poland Dr. Magdalena Jakubowska (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Sylwia Kaczmarek (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Piotr Kaczyński (Pesticide Residue) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Chetan Keswani (Biological Control) Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India Dr. Tomasz Klejdysz (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Franciszek Kornobis (Zoology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Karlos Lisboa (Biotechnology) Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Federal University of Alagoas, Alagoas, Brazil Dr. Vahid Mahdavi (Entomology) University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran Dr. Kinga Matysiak (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Yongzhi Wang (Virology and Bacteriology) Jilin Academy of Agricultral Sciences, Changchun, Jilin Province, China Dr. Przemysław Wieczorek (Biotechnology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Huan Zhang (Plant Pathology) Texas A&M University, Texas, USA Managing Editors Małgorzata Maćkowiak e-mail: m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl Monika Kardasz e-mail: m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl Proofreaders in English Delia Gosik Halina Staniszewska-Gorączniak Statistical Editor Dr. Jan Bocianowski Technical Editor Tomasz Adamski

Contact

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Institute of Plant Protection
National Research Institute
Władysława Węgorka 20
60–318 Poznań, Poland

tel.: +48 61 864 90 30
e-mail: office@plantprotection.pl

Managing Editors

Malgorzata Mackowiak
m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl

Monika Kardasz
m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl

Instructions for authors

Instructions for Authors

Manuscripts published in JPPR are free of charge. Only colour figures and photos are payed 61.5 € per one colour page JPPR publishes original research papers, short communications, critical reviews, and book reviews covering all areas of modern plant protection. Subjects include phytopathological virology, bacteriology, mycology and applied nematology and entomology as well as topics on protecting crop plants and stocks of crop products against diseases, viruses, weeds, etc. Submitted manuscripts should provide new facts or confirmatory data. All manuscripts should be written in high-quality English. Non-English native authors should seek appropriate help from English-writing professionals before submission. The manuscript should be submitted only via the JPPR Editorial System (http://www.editorialsystem.com/jppr). The authors must also remember to upload a scan of a completed License to Publish (point 4 and a handwritten signature are of particular importance). ALP form is available at the Editorial System. The day the manuscript reaches the editors for the first time is given upon publication as the date ‘received’ and the day the version, corrected by the authors is accepted by the reviewers, is given as the date ‘revised’. All papers are available free of charge at the Journal’s webpage (www.plantprotection.pl). However, colour figures and photos cost 61.5 € per one colour page.

General information for preparing a manuscript

All text should be written in a concise and integrated way, by focusing on major points, findings, breakthrough or discoveries, and their broad significance. All running text should be in Times New Roman 12, 1.5 spacing with all margins 2.5 cm on all sides.

Original article

The original research articles should contain the following sections: Title – the title should be unambiguous, understandable to specialists in other fields, and must reflect the contents of the paper. No abbreviations may be used in the title. Name(s) of author(s) with affiliations footnoted added only to the system, not visible in the manuscript (Double Blind Reviews). The names of the authors should be given in the following order: first name, second name initial, surname. Affiliations should contain: name of institution, faculty, department, street, city with zip code, and country. Abstract – information given in the title does not need to be repeated in the abstract. The abstract should be no longer than 300 words. It must contain the aim of the study, methods, results and conclusions. If used, abbreviations should be limited and must be explained when first used. Keywords – a maximum of 6, should cover the most specific terms found in the paper. They should describe the subject and results and must differ from words used in the title. Introduction – a brief review of relevant research (with references to the most important and recent publications) should lead to the clear formulation of the working hypothesis and aim of the study. It is recommended to indicate what is novel and important in the study. Materials and Methods – in this section the description of experimental procedures should be sufficient to allow replication. Organisms must be identified by scientific name, including authors. The International System of Units (SI) and their abbreviations should be used. Methods of statistical processing, including the software used, should also be listed in this section. Results – should be presented clearly and concisely without deducting and theori sing. Graphs should be preferred over tables to express quantitative data. Discussion – should contain an interpretation of the results ( without unnecessary repetition) and explain the influence of experimental factors or methods. It should describe how the results and their interpretation relate to the scientific hypothesis and/or aim of the study. The discussion should take into account the current state of knowledge and up-to-date literature. It should highlight the significance and novelty of the paper. It may also point to the next steps that will lead to a better understanding of the matters in question. Acknowledgements – of people, grants, funds, etc. should be placed in a separate section before the reference list. The names of funding organizations should be written in full. References In the text, papers with more than two authors should be cited by the last name of the first author, followed by et al. (et al. in italics), a space, and the year of publication (example: Smith et al. 2012). If the cited manuscript has two authors, the citation should include both last names, a space, and the publication year (example: Marconi and Johnston 2006). In the Reference section, a maximum of ten authors of the cited paper may be given. All references cited in the text must be listed in the Reference section alphabetically by the last names of the author(s) and then chronologically. The year of publication follows the authors’ names. All titles of the cited articles should be given in English. Please limit the citation of papers published in languages other than English. If necessary translate the title into English and provide information concerning the original language in brackets (e.g. in Spanish). The list of references should only include works from the last ten years that have had the greatest impact on the subject. Older references can be cited only if they are important for manuscript content. The full name of periodicals should be given. If possible, the DOI number should be added at the end of each reference. The following system for arranging references should be used: Journal articles Jorjani M., Heydari A., Zamanizadeh H.R., Rezaee S., Naraghi L., Zamzami P. 2012. Controlling sugar beet mortality disease by application of new bioformulations. Journal of Plant Protection Research 52 (3): 303-307. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/v10045-012-0049-9 Online articles Turner E., Jacobson D.J., Taylor J.W. 2011. Genetic architecture of a reinforced, postmating, reproductive isolation barrier between Neurospora species indicates evolution via natural selection. PLoS Genetics 7 (8): e1002204. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204 Books Bancrof J.D., Stevens A. 1996. Theory and Practice of Histological Techniques. 4th ed. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, UK, 776 pp. Book chapters Pradhan S.K. 2000. Integrated pest management. p. 463-469. In: "IPM System in Agriculture. Cash Crop" (R.K. Upadhyaya, K.G. Mukerji, O.P. Dubey, eds.). Aditya Books Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, India, 710 pp. Online documents Cartwright J. 2007. Big stars have weather too. IOP Publishing PhysicsWeb. Available on: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204

Tables, Figures, Phothographs, Drawings

Tables and figures should be uploaded as separated files at the submission stage. Their place in the manuscript should be clearly indicated by authors. Colour figures are accepted at no charge for the electronic version. In the hardcopy version of the journal, colour figures cost (65,5 € per one colour page). When attaching files please indicate if you want colour only in the online version or in both the online and the hardcopy. Photographs and RGB bitmaps should be provided in JPG or TIFF file format. They must have no less than 300 dpi resolution. The text column should be 8 cm wide and they must be at least 1000 pixels wide. Please send original (not resized) photograph(s), straight from a digital camera, without any text descriptions on the photo. Bitmaps combined with text object descriptions should be provided in MS Word or MS Powerpoint format. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Drawings should be provided in MS Word, MS Powerpoint, CorelDRAW or EPS file format and stored with original data file. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Charts (MS Excel graphs) should be provided in MS Excel file format, and stored with original MS Excel data file without captions but with the number of the figure attached. Please do not use bitmap fills for bar charts. Use colour fills only if necessary. Captions and legends should be added at the end of the text, referred to as "Fig." and numbered consecutively throughout the paper.

Rapid communications

Rapid communications should present brief observations which do not warrant the length of a full paper. However, they must present completed studies and follow the same scientific standards as original articles. Rapid communications should contain the following sections: Title Abstract - less than 300 words Key words - maximum 6 Text body Acknowledgements References The length of such submissions is limited to 1500 words for the text, one table, and one figure.

Reviews

Review articles are invited by the editors.Unsolicited reviews are also considered. The length is limited to 5000 words with no limitations on figures and tables and a maximum of 150 references. Mini-Review articles should be dedicated to "hot" topics and limited to 3000 words and a maximum two figures, two tables and 20 references.

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