Life Sciences and Agriculture

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Content

Journal of Plant Protection Research | 2004 | vol. 44 | No 3 |

Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The insecticidal and antifeedant activity of extracts derived from different plants of the Liguidamber orientalis Mill. (Hamamelidaceae), Tanacetum vulgare L. (Compositae), Achillea coarctata Willd. (Compositae), Buxus sempervirens L. (Buxaceae), Diospyros kaki L. (Ebenaceae), Arum italicum Mill. (Araceae), Achilea biebersteinii Willd. (Compositae), Origanum vulgare L. (Labiatae), Hypericum androsaemum L. (Hypericaceae) and Ocimum basilicum L. (Labiatae). are reported. The 70% alcohol extracts of plants were tested for toxicity against the 3–4th instar larvae of the Yponomeuta malinellus Zell. (Lepidoptera.: Yponomeutidae). Antifeedant activity of the extracts was assessed through tests conducted on the larvae of Y. malinellus by the feeding protection bioassay. In tests carried out on the larvae of Y. malinellus, L. orientalis, O. basilicum and A. coarctata extracts showed high toxicity within 48 hour LC50’s of 75, 75 and 65% respectively. The toxicity effects of the other extracts were determined as 60, 50, 50, 50, 45, 45 and 40% within the same period, respectively. No mortality was noticed in control groups. Alcohol extract from L. orientalis, T. vulgare and B. sempervirens showed high antifeedant activity (80.90, 46.12) on the larvae of Y. malinellus. In addition to both T. vulgare and L. orientalis extracts caused decrease consumption of food per 1 mg of larvae body weight decrease showed high –8.465, –0.845, mg respectively. The highest consumption (557.6 mg) was observed with alcohol extract from, D. kaki whereas the minimum one was using alcohol extract from L. orientali. The other tested extracts showed similar activity.

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Ömer Ertürk
Vedat Şekeroğlu
Ahmet Koç Yavuz Kalkan
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

During the years of observations pedatory arthropods of Arachnida, Chrysopidae, Heteroptera, Coccinellidae, and Syrphidae were collected from Myzocallis coryli Goetze colonies. Arachnida constituted the most numerous group followed by predatory bugs of Heteroptera.

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Elżbieta Wojciechowicz-Żytko
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Genotypic differentiation among 10 isolates of Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands and 24 isolates of Phytophthora citricola Sawada from 12 different plant species grown in Polish ornamental nurseries was determined. DNA was extracted from pure pathogen cultures and amplified by the PCR technique using ISSR and RAPD primers. 9 primers were used to amplify P. cinnamomi and 8 to amplify P. citricola DNA. The analyzed amplification products were between 300 and 2300 bp. The genotypical differentiation was from 17 to 35% in P. cinnamomi and from 10 to 60% in P. citricola. Isolates from host plants of the same family showed, with some exceptions, similar levels of differentiation.

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Katarzyna Wiejacha
Aleksandra Trzewik
Leszek B. Orlikowski
Grażyna Szkuta
Teresa Orlikowska
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Research performed in the years 1999–2002 was carried out in Great Poland region on varieties of winter wheat Elena and Tercja. Experiments included three programmes of wheat cultivation: 1 – Conventional winter wheat protection based on recommendations for commercial fields; 2 – Integrated pest management programme where the control of diseases and insect pests was carried out on the background of thresholds of harmfulness/noxiousness, and weather forecasts; 3 – Untreated, without protection against diseases and pests. Two levels of nitrogen fertilization were applied in the experiments (120 kg N/ha and 170 kg N/ha) and the newest plant protection products were used for controlling fungal pathogens and noxious insects. The occurrence of diseases and insect pests, as well as beneficial entomofauna was determined in relation to each experimental variant, and occurring changes were analysed. Effectiveness of disease and pest control were calculated. Grain yield and its quality were determined and economical profitability for both conventional and integrated programmes calculated. It was shown that a high profitability can be obtained through the application of integrated pest management, as a result of correct choice and application of plant protection products, as well as proper choice of wheat cultivars and appropriate nitrogen fertilization.

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Cecylia Jańczak
Pankracy Bubniewicz
Stefan Pruszyński
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The herbicide atrazine was incorporated in the granules manufactured in the process of tumbling agglomeration to obtain controlled release (CR) formulations. The formulations contained bentonite as a CRmatrix forming agent (960–974 g/kg of dry granules), atrazine (10 g/kg), citric acid (3.2 g/kg), and sodium alginate as a matrix binder and a release modifier (12.8–26.8 g/kg). The release characteristics of atrazine were studied by immersion of the granules in static water. The effects of formulations on atrazine transport through soil were studied using model soil columns irrigated with water. The release of atrazine from CR granules into water was affected by increasing the alginate concentration in a particular formulation because the time necessary for the release of 50% of the active ingredient was longer for the granules containing a higher amount of alginate. The CR formulations significantly reduced the amount of atrazine leached to the soil surface horizon in comparison with the commercial water suspension of the herbicide.

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Tomasz Małyszka
Tomasz Jankowski
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

In the years 2000–2003 under Polish climatic conditions early blight occurred at different level of incidence on over 90.6% of surveyed fields. Time of disease appearance in different regions was closely related to climatic conditions. On average, early blight appeared on potato plants 59.3 days after planting, earlier than late blight. In the years 2001–2003, efficacy of six selected fungicides in early blight control was examined in field conditions. Experiments carried out in the Department of Potato Protection and Seed Science of Plant Breedingand Acclimatization Institute. Field trials located in two sites – at Bonin and Stare Olesno revealed much slower development of early blight on these fields where chemical protection was applied as compared to untreated control. Efficacy of plant protection program carried out in Bonin over three years varied from 40% to 63.9%. Effectiveness of selected products was higher in Stare Olesno at higher infection pressure, and ranged from 49.8% to 66.6%. However, efficiency of chemical protection in early blight suppressing is not as satisfactory as in late blight control. In field experiments good control of early blight resulted in tuber yield increase. In Bonin yield increase varied from 5.5 to 24.2% and in Stare Olesno from 12.2 to 34.4%.

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Józefa Kapsa
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Studies on palatability of some commom weed species, herbaceous plants and oilseed rape to D. reticulatum, A. lusitanicus and A. rufus slugs have been carried out under laboratory conditions. In food choice trials the rate and degree of damage to seedlings and leaf disks were determined for 20 plant species. The conducted experiments have also permitted to establish, which plant species were preferred or were not accepted by particular slug species. It was found that the studied slug species preferred seedlings and leaves of Brassica napus and Papaver rhoeas, but showed no preference for Epilobium hirsutum, Geranium sanguineum and Saponaria officinalis plants. As to the remaining plant species under study, the preferences exhibited by particular slug species were quite diverse.

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Jan Kozłowski
Maria Kozłowska
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Studies on food preference of herbivores include no-choice test and test with choice or multiple choice. Conclusions from statistic analyses of these tests are compared descriptively. The definition of compatibility index and consumption growth index has enabled us to use nonparametric test for verification of hypotheses about homogeneity of the consumption growths of selected plant species under no-choice and multiple choice conditions. The studies were conducted on food preference of the slug Deroceras reticulatum. It has been found that Chamaenerion angustifolium, Geraniumpusillum and Potentilla anserina can be used to reduce this slug feeding on cultivated plants. It has been also found that seedlings of Polygonum aviculare can be used as alternative food for slugs.

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Maria Kozłowska
Jan Kozłowski
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Fieldexperiment with spring rape (Brassica napus var. oleifera f. annua) cultivars Star andLisonne was conductedin the years 1995–1999 at the vicinity of Olsztyn, Poland. The herbicides trifluralin (Triflurotox 250 EC), alachlor + trifluralin (Alatrif 380 EC), metazachlor (Butisan 400 SC) andclopyralid(Lontrel 300) were appliedin spring rape according to recommendations (Zalecenia 1993). The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of the herbicides on glucosinolates content in spring rape seeds. The obtainedresults revealedsignificant effect of meteorological conditions on glucosinolates content. The Star cv. was characterizedby higher level of these compounds in comparison with Lisonne cv. The adequate values were 15.96 μmol g-1 of d.m. and 12.32 μmol g-1 of d.m., respectively. It is evident on the base of the statistical analyses of the obtained results that herbicides modified glucosinolates content in seeds of both cultivars. The level of these compounds was increased as the effect of Triflurotox 250 EC use (data obtainedfrom three years investigations) and Alatrif 380 EC (four years) while Butisan 400 SC activity was unfavourable (four years).

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Barbara Adomas
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Studies on occurrence and harmfulness of celery fly on Sosnowski’s hogweed plants were performed in 1999–2002 in three plots at Minikowo, Mochełek and Topolno. At Mochełek, Minikowo and Topolno 40.65, 39.42 and 32.14% ofleaves, respectively were occupied by generation I ofthe fly while 14.8, 18.12 and 10%, respectively by the generation II. Most mines were caused by generation I in 2000 and 2002 at Minikowo and Mochełek. Generation II was characterized by a low population density in all plots.

Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Danuta Wrzesińska

Editorial office

Editor-in-Chief Prof. Henryk Pospieszny Department of Virology and Bacteriology Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute Władysława Węgorka 20, 60-318 Poznań, Poland e-mail: H.Pospieszny@iorpib.poznan.pl Associate Editors Dr. Zbigniew Czaczyk (Agricultural Engineering) Poznan Univeristy of Life Sciences, Poznań, Poland Dr. Magdalena Jakubowska (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Sylwia Kaczmarek (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Piotr Kaczyński (Pesticide Residue) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Chetan Keswani (Biological Control) Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India Dr. Tomasz Klejdysz (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Franciszek Kornobis (Zoology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Karlos Lisboa (Biotechnology) Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Federal University of Alagoas, Alagoas, Brazil Dr. Vahid Mahdavi (Entomology) University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran Dr. Kinga Matysiak (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Yongzhi Wang (Virology and Bacteriology) Jilin Academy of Agricultral Sciences, Changchun, Jilin Province, China Dr. Przemysław Wieczorek (Biotechnology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Huan Zhang (Plant Pathology) Texas A&M University, Texas, USA Managing Editors Małgorzata Maćkowiak e-mail: m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl Monika Kardasz e-mail: m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl Proofreaders in English Delia Gosik Halina Staniszewska-Gorączniak Statistical Editor Dr. Jan Bocianowski Technical Editor Tomasz Adamski

Contact

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Institute of Plant Protection
National Research Institute
Władysława Węgorka 20
60–318 Poznań, Poland

tel.: +48 61 864 90 30
e-mail: office@plantprotection.pl

Managing Editors

Malgorzata Mackowiak
m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl

Monika Kardasz
m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl

Instructions for authors

Instructions for Authors

Manuscripts published in JPPR are free of charge. Only colour figures and photos are payed 61.5 € per one colour page JPPR publishes original research papers, short communications, critical reviews, and book reviews covering all areas of modern plant protection. Subjects include phytopathological virology, bacteriology, mycology and applied nematology and entomology as well as topics on protecting crop plants and stocks of crop products against diseases, viruses, weeds, etc. Submitted manuscripts should provide new facts or confirmatory data. All manuscripts should be written in high-quality English. Non-English native authors should seek appropriate help from English-writing professionals before submission. The manuscript should be submitted only via the JPPR Editorial System (http://www.editorialsystem.com/jppr). The authors must also remember to upload a scan of a completed License to Publish (point 4 and a handwritten signature are of particular importance). ALP form is available at the Editorial System. The day the manuscript reaches the editors for the first time is given upon publication as the date ‘received’ and the day the version, corrected by the authors is accepted by the reviewers, is given as the date ‘revised’. All papers are available free of charge at the Journal’s webpage (www.plantprotection.pl). However, colour figures and photos cost 61.5 € per one colour page.

General information for preparing a manuscript

All text should be written in a concise and integrated way, by focusing on major points, findings, breakthrough or discoveries, and their broad significance. All running text should be in Times New Roman 12, 1.5 spacing with all margins 2.5 cm on all sides.

Original article

The original research articles should contain the following sections: Title – the title should be unambiguous, understandable to specialists in other fields, and must reflect the contents of the paper. No abbreviations may be used in the title. Name(s) of author(s) with affiliations footnoted added only to the system, not visible in the manuscript (Double Blind Reviews). The names of the authors should be given in the following order: first name, second name initial, surname. Affiliations should contain: name of institution, faculty, department, street, city with zip code, and country. Abstract – information given in the title does not need to be repeated in the abstract. The abstract should be no longer than 300 words. It must contain the aim of the study, methods, results and conclusions. If used, abbreviations should be limited and must be explained when first used. Keywords – a maximum of 6, should cover the most specific terms found in the paper. They should describe the subject and results and must differ from words used in the title. Introduction – a brief review of relevant research (with references to the most important and recent publications) should lead to the clear formulation of the working hypothesis and aim of the study. It is recommended to indicate what is novel and important in the study. Materials and Methods – in this section the description of experimental procedures should be sufficient to allow replication. Organisms must be identified by scientific name, including authors. The International System of Units (SI) and their abbreviations should be used. Methods of statistical processing, including the software used, should also be listed in this section. Results – should be presented clearly and concisely without deducting and theori sing. Graphs should be preferred over tables to express quantitative data. Discussion – should contain an interpretation of the results ( without unnecessary repetition) and explain the influence of experimental factors or methods. It should describe how the results and their interpretation relate to the scientific hypothesis and/or aim of the study. The discussion should take into account the current state of knowledge and up-to-date literature. It should highlight the significance and novelty of the paper. It may also point to the next steps that will lead to a better understanding of the matters in question. Acknowledgements – of people, grants, funds, etc. should be placed in a separate section before the reference list. The names of funding organizations should be written in full. References In the text, papers with more than two authors should be cited by the last name of the first author, followed by et al. (et al. in italics), a space, and the year of publication (example: Smith et al. 2012). If the cited manuscript has two authors, the citation should include both last names, a space, and the publication year (example: Marconi and Johnston 2006). In the Reference section, a maximum of ten authors of the cited paper may be given. All references cited in the text must be listed in the Reference section alphabetically by the last names of the author(s) and then chronologically. The year of publication follows the authors’ names. All titles of the cited articles should be given in English. Please limit the citation of papers published in languages other than English. If necessary translate the title into English and provide information concerning the original language in brackets (e.g. in Spanish). The list of references should only include works from the last ten years that have had the greatest impact on the subject. Older references can be cited only if they are important for manuscript content. The full name of periodicals should be given. If possible, the DOI number should be added at the end of each reference. The following system for arranging references should be used: Journal articles Jorjani M., Heydari A., Zamanizadeh H.R., Rezaee S., Naraghi L., Zamzami P. 2012. Controlling sugar beet mortality disease by application of new bioformulations. Journal of Plant Protection Research 52 (3): 303-307. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/v10045-012-0049-9 Online articles Turner E., Jacobson D.J., Taylor J.W. 2011. Genetic architecture of a reinforced, postmating, reproductive isolation barrier between Neurospora species indicates evolution via natural selection. PLoS Genetics 7 (8): e1002204. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204 Books Bancrof J.D., Stevens A. 1996. Theory and Practice of Histological Techniques. 4th ed. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, UK, 776 pp. Book chapters Pradhan S.K. 2000. Integrated pest management. p. 463-469. In: "IPM System in Agriculture. Cash Crop" (R.K. Upadhyaya, K.G. Mukerji, O.P. Dubey, eds.). Aditya Books Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, India, 710 pp. Online documents Cartwright J. 2007. Big stars have weather too. IOP Publishing PhysicsWeb. Available on: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204

Tables, Figures, Phothographs, Drawings

Tables and figures should be uploaded as separated files at the submission stage. Their place in the manuscript should be clearly indicated by authors. Colour figures are accepted at no charge for the electronic version. In the hardcopy version of the journal, colour figures cost (65,5 € per one colour page). When attaching files please indicate if you want colour only in the online version or in both the online and the hardcopy. Photographs and RGB bitmaps should be provided in JPG or TIFF file format. They must have no less than 300 dpi resolution. The text column should be 8 cm wide and they must be at least 1000 pixels wide. Please send original (not resized) photograph(s), straight from a digital camera, without any text descriptions on the photo. Bitmaps combined with text object descriptions should be provided in MS Word or MS Powerpoint format. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Drawings should be provided in MS Word, MS Powerpoint, CorelDRAW or EPS file format and stored with original data file. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Charts (MS Excel graphs) should be provided in MS Excel file format, and stored with original MS Excel data file without captions but with the number of the figure attached. Please do not use bitmap fills for bar charts. Use colour fills only if necessary. Captions and legends should be added at the end of the text, referred to as "Fig." and numbered consecutively throughout the paper.

Rapid communications

Rapid communications should present brief observations which do not warrant the length of a full paper. However, they must present completed studies and follow the same scientific standards as original articles. Rapid communications should contain the following sections: Title Abstract - less than 300 words Key words - maximum 6 Text body Acknowledgements References The length of such submissions is limited to 1500 words for the text, one table, and one figure.

Reviews

Review articles are invited by the editors.Unsolicited reviews are also considered. The length is limited to 5000 words with no limitations on figures and tables and a maximum of 150 references. Mini-Review articles should be dedicated to "hot" topics and limited to 3000 words and a maximum two figures, two tables and 20 references.

This page uses 'cookies'. Learn more