Humanities and Social Sciences

Wiadomości Numizmatyczne

Content

Wiadomości Numizmatyczne | 2016 | Rok LX | Zeszyt 1-2 (201-202) |

Abstract

The subject of the article is a new classification of 15th-century, anonymous Polish denars of type II, according to Stanisława Kubiak’s classification, attributed to Vladislaus III of Varna (1434–1444). The research is based on the Lublin hoard, concealed after 1455 and consisting of 1654 coins, mainly denars of the Polish king. The analysis of the images on the obverses and reverses led to establishing groups and variants of dies with common stylistic features, resulting in the proposal of a new chronological order for the coins.
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Abstract

The article focuses on three albums containing engravings of Polish medals which were prepared as illustrations to a work entitled The History of Poland, Recorded and Expounded with Medals, by Jan Chrzciciel Albertrandi, the president of the Warsaw Society of Friends of Learning. Four hundred and thirty-four copperplates were prepared for the engravings between 1822 and 1828. Following the failure of the November Uprising of 1830–1831, they were seized by the Russians and given to the Russian Imperial Academy of Sciences in St. Petersburg, where they remain to this day. Before they were taken, around thirty copies of the set were printed. The article presents the three albums preserved in the Krakow collection. They are analysed from several standpoints: their history, their provenance, antiquarian importance, and artistic value.
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Abstract

The article presents new finds of Roman Republican coins from the territories of Ukraine and Belarus. Before 2012 reports about finds of these coins were rare (22 confirmed single finds and one hoard). The last few years have dramatically changed the quantity of these coin finds: about 110 new Roman Republican coin finds from 35 sites in Ukraine and five in Belarus. It was possible as a result of active metal detector use by amateurs. Among single, cumulative finds and hoards (Chervone, Bonyshyn, Pochapy), the majority of coins are from the first half of the 1st century BC. The geographical distribution of new finds is very interesting: coin finds cluster in two areas (along the upper and middle course of the Dnister in Ukraine and in the upper reaches of the Bug in Belarus). Influx of these coins in the territory of Eastern Europe occured in part during the Late La Tène Period, but mostly during the Early Roman Period. This thesis perfectly confirm with finds of imitation of Roman Republican coins and other artefacts, specially, from the Zolochev raion, L’viv oblast.
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Abstract

On 26 January 2015, during ploughing, 23 silver coins and silver items (four pieces of molten silver, a small bar and a piece of a silver lamina) were found on the field in Grzymisław (gmina Debrzno, powiat człuchowski). The hoard was dated to the early eleventh century. It includes mainly coins of German origin — primarily from Saxon mints. Second group consists of one dirham and dirham fragments (3 items). Apart from them one Anglo-Saxon coin of Aethelred II was distinguished.
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Abstract

The purpose of this article is to describe ten silver coins from the eleventh and twelfth centuries. They were found during the archaeological excavations conducted in 2012 at a cemetery of this period in Prząsław, świętokrzyskie voivodeship.
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Abstract

After WWII and the demarcation of new borders, the Lusatian Neisse became a border river between Poland and Germany. The Gendenkhalle building in Zgorzelec/Görlitz, the seat of the Kaiser Friedrich Museum, found itself standing on the Polish side with its collection distributed among those museums in Poland that had escaped destruction. The numismatic collection from the former Friedrich Kaiser Museum was sent to the National Museum in Warsaw. Among them there was the Meissen bracteate hoard (1200 – c.1230) discovered during construction work in Kamjenc, Kamenz in Upper Lusatia in 1910. The subject of the article is a new analysis of the hoard stored in the National Museum in Warsaw, based on the description made by Heineken in 1913.
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Abstract

The suburb of Kalisz, called the Old Town, is a historical craft and trade settlement located near the ducal castle — the early medieval town of Kalisz. In 2001, during archaeological excavations a number of coins were discovered at this location. Six of them are the subject of this paper. They are bracteates struck in the second half of the 13th century, probably in Greater Poland during the reign of Przemysł II (†1296).
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Abstract

During architectural and archaeological studies conducted in 1983 and 1985 at the site of medieval Ołbin Abbey, located in the Wrocław quarter of Ołbin, eight coins were found; six of them were analysed. These are late medieval and modern coins. All coins were precisely identified and described. Studies of the elemental composition of coins were undertaken with a non-destructive method, using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The results of analyses showed that coins were made from an alloy of copper and silver with varied content of main elements.
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Abstract

Archaeological rescue excavations in Byczyna at site 1 (medieval town graveyard) were conducted between 1 July 2009 and 1 August 2010. During the excavations 670 11th to 18th century graves were discovered. There were at least 62 coins dated from the 14th to the 19th centuries found in the graveyard area. They were grave gifts, accidental finds, and losses.
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Abstract

The subject of the work is the recognition and analysis of nine coins from the 15th–20th centuries, found during archaeological exploration of a site at the Market Square in Barczewo (Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship).
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Abstract

The article reviews the Polish translation and the English version of the book by Petr Vorel, From the Silver Czech Tolar to a Worldwide Dollar. The Birth of the Dollar and its Journey of Monetary Circulation in Europe and the World from the 16th to the 20th Century, Columbia University Press 2013. A short summary of the genealogy of the dollar leads to the second part of the article, in which the issue is discussed whether a common monetary system existed in early modern Europe. This article focuses on the interdependence between big silver coins minted primarily in the Holy Roman Empire and the Polish-Lithuanian Union and used in international trade.
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Editorial office

Komitet Redakcyjny

Borys Paszkiewicz (redaktor naczelny, redaktor tematyczny: średniowiecze i nowożytność),
Adam Degler (redaktor tematyczny: starożytność),
Michał Zawadzki (redaktor tematyczny: znaleziska, sekretarz redakcji)
Marta Męclewska (redaktor bibliograficzny),
Piotr Jaworski (zastępca sekretarza redakcji),

 

Rada naukowa
Jarosław Bodzek,
Aleksander Bursche,
Peter Ilisch,
Mykolas Michelbertas,
Petr Vorel,
Roman Zaoral

 

Contact

Polska Akademia Nauk,
Pl. Defilad1 (Pałac Kultury i Nauki)
00-901 Warszawa
wiad.num@wp.pl

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