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Abstract

The paper presents a solidification sequence of graphite eutectic cells of A and D types, as well as globular and cementite eutectics. The morphology of eutectic cells in cast iron, the equations for their growth and the distances between the graphite precipitations in A and D eutectic types were analyzed. It is observed a critical eutectic growth rate at which one type of eutectic transformed into another. A mathematical formula was derived that combined the maximum degree of undercooling, the cooling rate of cast iron, eutectic cell count and the eutectic growth rate. One type of eutectic structure turned smoothly into the other at a particular transition rate, transformation temperature and transformational eutectic cell count. Inoculation of cast iron increased the number of eutectic cells with flake graphite and the graphite nodule count in ductile iron, while reducing the undercooling. An increase in intensity of inoculation caused a smooth transition from a cementite eutectic structure to a mixture of cementite and D type eutectic structure, then to a mixture of D and A types of eutectics up to the presence of only the A type of eutectic structure. Moreover, the mechanism of inoculation of cast iron was studied.
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Abstract

Determined were direction and intensity of influence of alloying additions on the number of eutectic graphite colonies in austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu. Chemical composition of the cast iron was 1.7 to 3.3% C, 1.4 to 3.1% Si, 2.8 to 9.9% Ni, 0.4 to 7.7% Mn, 0 to 4.6% Cu, 0.14 to 0.16% P and 0.03 to 0.04% S. Analysed were structures of mottled (20 castings) and grey (20 castings) cast iron. Obtained were regression equations determining influence intensity of individual components on the number of graphite colonies per 1 cm2 (LK). It was found that, in spite of high total content of alloying elements in the examined cast iron, the element that mainly decides the LK value is carbon, like in a plain cast iron.
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Abstract

The objective of the research was to determine the influence of boron on the crystallization process and microstructure of ductile cast iron. In the case of ductile cast iron it is a vital issue because even as little as trace presence of boron changes the properties of ductile cast iron in a significant way. With the use of a new ATD-4 (TDA) tester and CRYSTALDIGRPAH converter it was possible to measure the crystallization process parameters of the same alloy with four different contents of boron in one mould. Four samples with different boron contents were extracted, their microhardness was measured and quantitative analysis of microstructure was conducted. Obtained results allowed to state that with increasing content of boron the amount of graphite precipitates decreases, the amount of pearlite precipitates increases, the shape of graphite precipitates deteriorates and hardness increases. It is also planned to perform additional testings with boron contents between previously tested values.
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Abstract

The paper describes the influence of graphite shape, size and amount to electrical properties of different cast irons. Experiments of electrical resistivity measurements were conducted during solidification of four different melts in different time intervals from melt treatment by inoculation and nodularization. Metallographic analyses were made in order to determine the shape, size, distribution and amount of graphite and correlate results with electrical resistivity measurements. It was found out that nodular graphite is giving the lowest electrical resistivity and is decreased during solidification. Electrical resistivity of lamellar cast iron is increased during solidification since lamellas interrupt metal matrix severely There is no significant difference in resistivity of vermicular cast iron from nodular cast iron. Smaller size of graphite and lower amount of graphite and higher amount of metal matrix also decrease resistivity.
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Abstract

Silicon – molybdenum cast iron commonly called SiMo due to its unique properties has becoming more and more interesting engineering material. The history and development of this alloy is relatively long but, due to the significant difficulties during the manufacturing process resulting in the lower final quality than expected, it has not been applied to often in practice. The biggest challenge is its brittleness as a result of the carbides precipitations. During last few years, thanks to the many important researches made and the general foundry technology development, the interest in SiMo iron has been rapidly growing, especially for the castings for heavy duty applications like corrosion, high temperature and wear abrasion resistant parts. In the article the heat treatment attempts to improve the microstructure of SiMo castings has been presented. The goal was to destroy or at least to refine and uniformly distribute the carbides precipitations to improve mechanical properties of the exhaust manifold castings for the cars. The experiments were carried out for the alloy contains approx. 4% Si, 1% Mo and 3.2%C. The range of the research included: hardness measuring, standard mechanical properties and microstructure for as-cast state and after that the subsequent heat treatment process with another properties check. The result of the heat treatment was the elimination of pearlite from the metal matrix. Moreover, the changes of the carbide molybdenum – rich phase morphology were observed. The dispersion of the carbides precipitations in the carbides area was observed. The experiments proved the possibility to control the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the SiMo castings by means of heat treatment but only to some extent.
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Abstract

The validation of each simulation code used in foundry domain requires individual approach due to its specificity. This validation can by elaborated on the basis of experimental results or in particular cases by comparison the simulation results from different codes. The article concerns the influence of grey cast iron density curve and different forms of solid fraction curve Fs=f(T) on the formation of shrinkage discontinuities. Solid fraction curves applying Newtonian Thermal Analysis (NTA) were estimated. The experimental and numerical simulation tests were performed on the castings, which were made with Derivative Thermal Analysis (DerTA) standard cups. The numerical tests were realized using NovaFlow&Solid (NF&S), ProCast and Vulcan codes. In this work, the coupled influence of both curves on the dynamics of the shrinkage-expansion phenomena and on shrinkage defects prognosis in grey cast iron castings has been revealed. The final evaluation of the simulation systems usefulness should be based on validation experiment, preceded by comparing the simulation results of available systems which are proposed in given technology.
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Abstract

The contribution summarises the results of oxygen activity determinations, which were measured and registered continuously in castings from cast irons with various types of graphite. The results were used to find the relationship between two variables: natural logarithm of oxygen activities and reverse value of thermodynamic temperature 1 /T. Obtained regression lines were used to calculate oxygen activity at different temperatures, to calculate Gibbs free energy ΔG at the different temperatures and to calculate the single ΔG value for significant temperature of the graphite solidification. The results were processed by a statistical analysis of data files for the different types of graphite with flake, vermicular and spheroidal graphite. Each material has its proper typical oxygen activities range and individual temperature function of Gibbs free energy for analysing and governing casting quality.
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Abstract

The study reported in this paper was aimed at establishing the effect of values of parameters characterizing the process of superficial remelting of a nodular iron casting on the quantity of introduced heat, geometry of remeltings as well as parameter λ and hardness of cementite eutectic. The remelting process was carried out using GTAW method, at electric arc length of 3 mm in argon atmosphere, welding current intensities I = 50, 130, 210, and 300 A, and electric arc scanning speeds vs = 200, 400, and 800 mm/min. The measurements included estimation of the quantity of heat introduced to the casting in the electric arc-induced remelting process with the use of flow calorimeter. Widths and depths of remetlings were assessed with the use of metallographic method. As a result of fast solidification, cementite eutectic was obtained in remelted material in which, in the course of cooling down to ambient temperature, austenite was subject to partial transformation into martensite. To characterize the cementite eutectic, value of the structural parameter λ was assessed. Values of the parameter were similar for areas of occurrence of both fibrous and laminated eutectic. Remeltings were examined at half of their depths. Micro-hardness measurements were taken in the same areas. The established quantitative relationships may prove to be useful in practice for the purpose of predicting values of parameter λ and hardness of remeltings in studies aimed at improving resistance of cast-iron castings to abrasive wear.
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