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Abstract

Nickel-based alloys are widely used in industries such as the aircraft industry, chemicals, power generation, and others. Their stable mechanical properties in combination with high resistance to aggressive environments at high temperatures make these materials suitable for the production of components of devices and machines intended for operation in extremely difficult conditions, e.g. in aircraft engines. This paper presents the results of thermal and mechanical tests performed on precision castings made of the Inconel 713C alloy and intended for use in the production of low pressure turbine blades. The tests enabled the determination of the nil strength temperature (NST), the nil ductility temperature (NDT), and the ductility recovery temperature (DRT) of the material tested. Based on the values obtained, the high temperature brittleness range (HTBR) and the hot cracking resistance index were determined. Metallographic examinations were conducted in order to describe the cracking mechanisms. It was found that the main cracking mechanism was the partial melting of grains and subsequently the rupture of a thin liquid film along crystal boundaries as a result of deformation during crystallisation. Another cracking mechanism identified was the DDC (Ductility Dip Cracking) mechanism. The results obtained provide a basis for improving precision casting processes for aircraft components and constitute guidelines for designers, engineers, and casting technologists.
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Abstract

The aim of the performed experiments was to determine the influence of a cooling rate on the evolution of microstructure and hardness of the steel 27MnCrB5. By using dilatometric tests performed on the plastometer Gleeble 3800 and by using mathematical modelling in the software QTSteel a continuous cooling transformation diagram for a heating temperature of 850°C was constructed. Conformity of diagrams constructed for both methods is relatively good, except for the position and shape of the ferrite nose. The values of hardness, temperatures of phase transformations and the volume fractions of structural phases upon cooling from the temperature of 850°C at the rate from 0.16°C · s–1 to 37.2°C · s–1 were determined. Mathematically predicted proportion of martensite with real data was of relatively solid conformity, but the hardness values evaluated by mathematical modelling was always higher.
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