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Abstract

The study makes an attempt to model a complete vibrating guitar including its non-linear features, specifically the tension-compression of truss rod and tension of strings. The purpose of such a model is to examine the influence of design parameters on tone. Most experimental studies are flawed by uncertainties introduced by materials and assembly of an instrument. Since numerical modelling of instruments allows for deterministic control over design parameters, a detailed numerical model of folk guitar was analysed and an experimental study was performed in order to simulate the excitation and measurement of guitar vibration. The virtual guitar was set up like a real guitar in a series of geometrically non-linear analyses. Balancing of strings and truss rod tension resulted in a realistic initial state of deformation, which affected the subsequent spectral analyses carried out after dynamic simulations. Design parameters of the guitar were freely manipulated without introducing unwanted uncertainties typical for experimental studies. The study highlights the importance of acoustic medium in numerical models.
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Abstract

This paper gives a detailed electroacoustic study of a new generation of monolithic CMOS micromachined electrodynamic microphone, made with standard CMOS technology. The monolithic integration of the mechanical sensor with the electronics using a standard CMOS process is respected in the design, which presents the advantage of being inexpensive while having satisfactory performance. The MEMS microphone structure consists mainly of two planar inductors which occupy separate regions on substrate. One inductor is fixed; the other can exercise out-off plane movement. Firstly, we detail the process flow, which is used to fabricate our monolithic microphone. Subsequently, using the analogy between the three different physical domains, a detailed electro-mechanical-acoustic analogical analysis has been performed in order to model both frequency response and sensitivity of the microphone. Finally, we show that the theoretical microphone sensitivity is maximal for a constant vertical position of the diaphragm relative to the substrate, which means the distance between the outer and the inner inductor. The pressure sensitivity, which is found to be of the order of a few tens of μV/Pa, is flat within a bandwidth from 50 Hz to 5 kHz.
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