Search results

Filters

  • Journals
  • Authors
  • Keywords
  • Date
  • Type

Search results

Number of results: 2
items per page: 25 50 75
Sort by:

Abstract

The paper presents experimental results of the visualization of the nonlinear aeroacoustic sound generation phenomena occurring in organ flue pipe. The phase-locked particle image velocimetry technique is applied to visualize the mixed velocity field in the transparent organ flue pipe model made from Plexiglas. Presented measurements were done using synchronization to the tone generated by the pipe itself sup- plied by controlled air flow with seeding particles. The time series of raw velocity field distribution images show nonlinear sound generation mechanisms: the large amplitude of deflection of the mean flue jet and vortex shedding in the region of pipe mouth. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) was then applied to the experimental data to separately visualize the mean mass flow, pulsating jet mass flow with vortices and also sound waves near the generation region as well as inside and outside of the pipe. The resulting POD spatial and temporal modes were used to approximate the acoustic velocity field behaviour at the pipe fundamental frequency. The temporal modes shapes are in a good agreement with the microphone pressure signal shape registered from a distance. Obtained decomposed spatial modes give interesting insight into sound generating region of the organ pipe and the transition area towards the pure acoustic field inside the resonance pipe. They can give qualitative and quantitative data to verify existing sound generation models used in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA).
Go to article

Abstract

This paper presents the research studies carried out on the application of lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to computational aeroacoustics (CAA). The Navier-Stokes equation-based solver faces the difficulty of computational efficiency when it has to satisfy the high-order of accuracy and spectral resolution. LBM shows its capabilities in direct and indirect noise computations with superior space-time resolution. The combination of LBM with turbulence models also work very well for practical engineering machinery noise. The hybrid LBM decouples the discretization of physical space from the discretization of moment space, resulting in flexible mesh and adjustable time-marching. Moreover, new solving strategies and acoustic models are developed to further promote the application of LBM to CAA.
Go to article

This page uses 'cookies'. Learn more