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Abstract

The paper considers Timothy Snyder’s applied methodology of history. Snyder’s original field of interest as a professional historian was historical biography, but it did not take him long to put transnational history at the centre of his attention. The author posits that Snyder’s practice in this historiographic paradigm has laid the foundation for his greatest academic achievements, leading to him being recognized as one of the best historians working today.
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Abstract

This paper is devoted to the surname changes performed through administrative channels in the interwar period. The research is based on the announcements of the “Official Gazette of the Republic of Poland” in 1929. The author describes main reasons for the decisions of surname changes taking into account characteristics of avoided surnames and chosen demographic tendencies, especially those connected with the age and profession of applicants. People of Jewish origin, Poles and representatives of other nationalities showed different motives for surname changes. Jews most frequently changed their surnames due to legal reasons — they wanted to legalize the unlawful use of a surname of the so-called ritual father. The changes carried out under the motive of assimilation occurred definitely less often. Non-Jewish applicants changed mainly appellative names, especially those derived from words related to animals. After comparing tendencies occurring before and after World War II one concludes that besides legal and assimilation factors which are particular to the pre-war decades (connected with the ethnic, legal and religious situation of the time), the remaining reasons for the surname changes are universal and do not distinguish the pre-war period from that of the post-war.
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Abstract

In 2019 the Polish Jazz Association will celebrate its 50th anniversary. Its activities over that period were accompanied by countless publications in the following categories: 1) regular periodicals; 2) mimeographed typescripts and bulletins; 3) festival programmes and graphics; 4) others (flyers, ephemera, posters). The aim of this article is to examine the mechanisms of PJA publicizing its activities and using media to reach out to the jazz fan community
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