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Abstract

The purpose of the paper is to outline a systematic and unified non-local treatment of mode conversion effects associated with an interface superlattice being a 2D pseudo-array composed of altered phase inclusions (exemplified by impurity clusters) and located at a solid-solid plane interface. It will be illustrated, in some detail, for the instructive case of a Stoneley type acoustic wave (SW), incident on a periodically nonhomogeneous portion of an interface and partly transformed into bulk modes propagating in one of the component solid. An analytical model scheme is constructed, using a variational method combined with the T matrix approach, appropriate for the 2D periodic array treated, and decaying into the depth of this solid for the structure in a way determined by the array geometry and element 3D profiles as well as the boundary conditions at the interface. An apodization (weighting) to reduce the side-lobes level is incorporated into the structure by appropriately varying lateral dimensions and the depth of particular scatterers.
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Abstract

A number of micromechanical investigations have been performed to predict behaviour of composite interfaces, showing that the detailed behaviour of the material at these interfaces frequently dominates the behaviour of the composite as a whole. The interfacial interaction is an extremely complex process due to continuous evolution of interfacial zones during deformation and this is particularly true for carbon nanotubes since the interfacial interaction is confined to the discrete molecular level. The atomic strain concept based upon Voronoi tessellation allows analyzing the molecular structure atom by atom, which may give a unique insight into deformation phenomena operative at molecular level such as interface behaviour in nanocomposites.
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Abstract

Oxide fiber-reinforced Ni-base composites have long been considered as attractive heat-resistant materials. After several decades of active research, however, interest in these materials began to decline around mid-1990’s due chiefly to 1) a lack of manufacturing technology to grow inexpensive single-crystal oxide fibers to be used in structural composites, and 2) fiber strength loss during processing due to chemical interactions with reactive solutes in the matrix. The cost disadvantage has been mitigated to a large extent by the development of innovative fiber fabrication processes such as the Internal Crystallization Method (ICM) that produces monocrystalline oxide fibers in a cost-effective manner. Fiber strength loss has been an equally restrictive issue but recent work has shown that it may be possible to design creep-resistant composites even when fiber surface reconstruction from chemical interactions has degraded the strength of extracted fibers tested outside the matrix. The key issue is the optimization of the composite- and interface structure. Reaction-formed defects may be healed by the matrix (or a suitable coating material) so that the fiber residing in the matrix may exhibit diminished sensitivity to flaws as compared to fibers extracted from the matrix and tested in isolation of the matrix. Generally, the Ni-base/Al2O3 composites exhibit acceptable levels of wettability and interface strength (further improved with the aid of reactive solutes), which are required for elevated-temperature creep-resistance. In order to harness the full potential of these composites, the quality of the interface as manifested in the fiber/matrix wettability, interface composition, interphase morphology, and interface strength must be designed. We identify key issues related to the measurement of contact angle, interface strength, and chemical and structural properties at the fiber/matrix interface in the Ni/alumina composites, and present the current state-ofthe-art in understanding and designing the Ni/alumina interface. There should be no doubt that optimization of the interface- and composite microstructure through judicious control of the fabrication process and surface modification shall yield technologically promising Ni-base/oxide fiber composites.
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Abstract

An uniaxial compression mechanical model for the roof rock-coal (RRC) composite sample was established in order to study the effects of height ratio of roof rock to coal on the structural strength of composite sample. The composite sample strengths under different height ratios were established through stress and strain analysis of the sample extracted from the interface. The coal strength near the interface is enhanced and rock strength near the interface weakened. The structural strength of composite sample is synthetically determined by the strengths of rock and coal near and far away from the interface. The area with a low strength in composite sample is destroyed firstly. An analytical model was proposed and discussed by conducting uniaxial compression tests for sandstone-coal composite samples with different height ratios, and it was found that the structural strength and elastic modulus decrease with a decrease in height ratio. The coal strengths far away from the interface determine the structural strengths of composite sample under different height ratios, which are the main control factor for the structural strength in this test. Due to its lowest strength, the rock near the interface first experienced a tensile spalling failure at the height ratio of 9:1, without causing the structural failure of composite sample. The coal failure induces the final failure of composite sample.
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