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Number of results: 8
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Abstract

In this article I deal with two social encyclical letters – Rerum novarum (1891) and Quadragesimo anno (1931). Also I undertake to discuss the views of Archbishop Wilhelm Emmanuel von Ketteler, who can be regarded as the most important forerunner of the ideas proclaimed later by Pope Leo XIII.
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Abstract

In this article I will try to describe the lesson learnt by the corporations from the grass root movements in the cities. In the proposed analysis I will refer to the conception of recuperation and a soul of capitalism – by Luc Boltanski and Ève Chiapello. Besides it I will refer to the works of these authors who analyse the beginnings and the activism of the city grass-root movements in a context of critique of capitalism and neoliberal system.
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Abstract

The author believes that one all-inclusive assessment of Marx’s philosophy is inevitably misleading. Although Marx constructed one theory that has a texture of a uniform fabric, the fabric has been woven with threads of two very different qualities. His presentation of capitalist instability, exploitation and alienation has the quality of scientific explanations. But his treatment of dialectic, economy formulated in terms of priceless commodities and his vision of communism is fantastic and arbitrary.
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Abstract

The article presents the main themes of the philosophy of Max Horkheimer, a representative of the Frankfurt School, starting from their social theory, with close affinities to the ideas of Karl Marx, up to the concept of transcendence and eschatological longings, which seem to be close to the views of Arthur Schopenhauer.
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Abstract

The author champions the belief that Karl Marx offered a theory of capitalism, and not a theory of socialism. This explains, she argues, why we cannot find a detailed and well-constructed conception of human society that will exist in the future. Marx continued, however, to draw prognostic conclusions from his diagnosis of the capitalist status quo, and his numerous manuscripts are replete with social predictions. They were different at different times, and as the capitalist system tended to change in his lifetime, so changed Marx’s expectations about the future course of events. One thing remained unchanged, however. He always proclaimed the coming of a classless community based on the principle that a free development of each is a necessary prerequisite of a free development of all.
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Abstract

Moje rozważania dotyczą jednego z podstawowych tematów egzystencjalnych. Śmierć jest przynależna ludzkiej kondycji, ale w kulturze Zachodu pozostawia się na nią coraz mniej miejsca. Można to interpretować jako rezultat tego, co Paul Tillich nazywał utratą „egzystencjalistycznego punktu widzenia”, rezultat wzmocniony przez rozwój kapitalizmu i zwycięstwo mieszczaństwa. Kiedyś o śmierci mówiło się otwarcie, istniały rytuały jej uszanowania, przejścia, kontaktowania się z nią i zachowania się po niej. Dziś śmierć stała się tematem nieprzyzwoitym, niewymawialnym. Efektem tego jest, że tak umierający człowiek, jak i osoba w żałobie nie mają o tym z kim porozmawiać. Ten proces wypierania śmierci jest długotrwały. Jego wczesne przejawy odnotowywał m.in. Walter Benjamin (w świecie jego bogatych krewnych nikt nie umierał, wszyscy byli nieśmiertelni, umierało się daleko, w sanatoriach). Dziś ludzie pytają psychologów, czy to normalne, że czują smutek po śmierci bliskich. Jednym ze sposobów przywrócenia śmierci miejsca w naszym doświadczeniu jest snucie o niej opowieści.
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Abstract

The author reviews the main elements of Richard Münch’s academic capitalism theory. By introducing categories like “audit university” or “entrepreneurial university,” the German sociologist critically sets the present academic management model against the earlier, modern-era conception of academic research as an “exchange of gifts.” In the sociological and psychological sense, the latter is a social communication structure rooted in traditional social lore, for instance the potlatch ceremonies celebrated by some North-American Indian tribes which Marcel Mauss described. Münch shows the similarities between that old “gift exchanging” model and the contemporary one with its focus on the psychosocial fundamentals of scientific praxis, and from this gradually derives the academic capitalism conception. His conclusion is the critical claim that science possesses its own, inalienable axiological autonomy and anthropological dimension, which degenerate in result of capitalism’s “colonisation” of science by means of state authority and money (here Münch refers to Jürgen Habermas’s philosophical argumentation). The author also offers many of his own reflections on the problem, which allows Münch’s analyses to be viewed in a somewhat broader context.
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