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Abstract

In the present paper, the effects of the subsequent extrusion after multi-pass equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) process on the mechanical properties and microstructure of WE43 magnesium alloy are investigated. First, second and fourth passes ECAP followed by an extrusion process are applied on WE43 magnesium alloy to refine the microstructure and to improve the mechanical properties for biomedical applications. The results showed that among the ECAPed samples, the highest and lowest strength were obtained in the second and the first pass processed samples, respectively. The four passes processed sample showed the highest elongation to failure with moderate strength. The sample processed via first pass ECAP followed by extrusion exhibits an excellent combination of ductility and strength. The highest strength was obtained in the sample processed via the second pass ECAP followed by extrusion while the highest elongation was achieved in the sample processed via fourth pass ECAP followed by extrusion. Moreover, Vickers micro-indentation tests demonstrate that hardness is enhanced by an increase in the number of ECAP passes. Furthermore, a grain refinement process is presented for ECAP processing of WE43 alloy which shows a good agreement with microstructural investigations.
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Abstract

Casting industry has been enriched with the processes of mechanization and automation in production. They offer both better working standards, faster and more accurate production, but also have begun to generate new opportunities for new foundry defects. This work discusses the disadvantages of processes that can occur, to a limited extend, in the technologies associated with mould assembly and during the initial stages of pouring. These defects will be described in detail in the further part of the paper and are mainly related to the quality of foundry cores, therefore the discussion of these issues will mainly concern core moulding sands. Four different types of moulding mixtures were used in the research, representing the most popular chemically bonded moulding sands used in foundry practise. The main focus of this article is the analysis of the influence of the binder type on mechanical and thermal deformation in moulding sands.
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Abstract

The constantly developing and the broadly understood automation of production processes in foundry industry, creates both new working conditions - better working standards, faster and more accurate production - and new demands for previously used materials as well as opportunities to generate new foundry defects. Those high requirements create the need to develop further the existing elements of the casting production process. This work focuses on mechanical and thermal deformation of moulding sands prepared in hot-box technology. Moulding sands hardened in different time periods were tested immediately after hardening and after cooling. The obtained results showed that hardening time period in the range 30-120 sec does not influence the mechanical deformation of tested moulding sands significantly. Hot distortion tests proved that moulding sands prepared in hot-box technology can be characterized with stable thermal deformation up to the temperature of circa 320oC.
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