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Abstract

The paper presents the results of a numerical study devoted to the hydraulic properties of a network of parallel triangular microchannels (hydraulic diameter Dh = 110 um). Previous experimental investigations had revealed that pressure drop through the microchannels system dramatically increases for the Reynolds number exceeding value of 10. The disagreement of the experimental findings with the estimations of flow resistance based on the assumption of fully developed flow were suspected to result from the so-called scale effect. Numerical simulations were performed by using the classical system of flow equations (continuity and Navier-Stokes equations) in order to explain the observed discrepancies. The calculations showed a very good agreement with the experimental results proving that there is no scale effect for the microchannels considered, i.e. the relevance of the constitutive flow model applied was confirmed. It was also clearly indicated that the excessive pressure losses in the high Reynolds number range are due to the secondary flows and separations appearing in several regions of the microchannel system.
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Abstract

The aim of this paper is to study the applicability of the theory of micropolar fluids to modelling and calculating flows in microchannels depending on the geometrical dimension of the flow field. First, it will be shown that if the characteristic linear dimension of the flow becomes appropriately large, the equations describing the micropolar fluid flow can be transformed into Navier-Stokes equations. Next, Poiseuille flows in a microchannel is studied in detail. In particular, the maximal cross-sectional size of the channel for which the micropolar effects of the fluid flow become important will be established. The experimentally determined values of rheological constants of the fluid have been used in calculations.
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Abstract

Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a simulation method at mesoscopic scales that bridges the gap between molecular dynamics and continuum hydrodynamics. It can simulate efficiently complex liquids and dense suspensions using only a few thousands of virtual particles and at speed-up factors of more than one hundred thousands compared to Molecular Dynamics. Lowe’s approach provides a powerful alternative to the usual DPD integrating schemes. Here, we demonstrate the details and potential of Lowe’s scheme. We compute viscosity, diffusivity and Schmidt number values and we present comparison of wormlike chain models under shear with experimental and Brownian Dynamics results for ll-phage DNA.
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