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Number of results: 6
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Abstract

Peat soils (FAO — Gelic Histosols) in the southern Bellsund coast area occur on slopes and terraces. They are formed in places favourable for plant growth, i.e. adequately moistened and fertilized largely with bird excrements. These formations belong to moss peats which are generally decomposed weakly and moderately to about 0.5 m depth. Their content of organic matter is equal to about 30-90%, but it is higher in terrace peats. The latter are more acidified than slope peats. The reaction both of slope and terrace peat soils is as a rule, slightly acid or neutral, and CaC03 content does not exceed 10%. As regards the content of macroelements, that of Al is the highest followed by Ca, Fe, Mg and P. Little K and Ti, and only traces of Na are found. Microelements occur in the following sequence: Mn, Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, Co, Cd. Particularly Mn, Zn as well as Cu and Cd were found in a higher concentration. Slope peat soils are richer in macro- and microelements than terrace ones, e.g. 4 times in the case of Mg. Peat soils poor in ash parts (up to 25% ash), contain the fewest elements. Some regularities concern also a vertical distribution of the particular profiles but only with regard to terrace peat soils.
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Abstract

The subject of investigations was the fragment of low peatland complex located close to Miękinia, about 30 km from Wrocław. Within the range of the examined area of peat bog complex there can be distinguished three parts differing in their utilization and composition of species, namely: 1/ the area degraded by the attempt to afforest it with alder trees Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertner, 2/ occasionally used bog hay meadow and 3/ typical peat forming phytocenosis. Total number of determined species, belonging to 11 phytosociological classes, ranged 77, out of which more than a half constitute representatives of Molinio-Arrhenatheretea class. As far as a non-afforested area was concerned, there were determined 5 phytocenosis, including 4 classified as peat forming ones and one typical for post-bog meadows (Alopecuretum pratensis). The afforested area featured herbaceous plant composition which indicated that the area with Alopecuretum pratensis phytocenosis had been degraded. Analysis of environmental requirements, done with the use of ecological numbers, proved that prevailing number of species characterize similar requirements. It was mainly afforested part to feature taxons of broader ecological scale, e.g. Polygonum bistora L., Carex hirta L. and Plantago lanceolata L. The afforested area was purchased by a private person, therefore it can be assumed that the reason for such a way of peatlands utilization was obtaining EU subsidies at minimum work effort. A higher financial profit, however, would have been made by the owner if he had maintained a bog area as an extensive meadow.
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Abstract

Fire has considerable impact on vegetation and organic soils properties. As we observed that the differences between vegetation of burnt and unburnt areas on the rich fen are visible 11 years after the fire, we assumed that the post-fire changes are long lasting, yet limited exclusively to the burnt areas. In order to check this hypothesis we studied spatial differentiation of physical and chemical properties of soils, and productivity capacities of burnt and unburnt areas in the fen in Biebrza National Park. We took soil samples from the neighboring burnt and unburnt areas, from the depth of 0–30 cm and 30–50 cm. We analyzed 21 parameters of the soils including: pH, ash content, moisture, bulk density, exchangeable K, Na, Ca, available P, N-NH4+, N-NO3−, total N, C, K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, P; and calculated C:N, C:P ratios. Surface layer of the burnt soils differed significantly from the unburnt soils in respect of 17 out of 21 parameters. The most pronounced difference was observed for available phosphorous (on average 6 times higher for the burnt soils). The differences in the deeper layer were mostly insignificant. The burnt areas were also characterized by twofold higher plant productivity than recorded for the unburnt areas. The influence of fire on peaty soils was long lasting but mostly limited to the surface layer of the soils. In the case of particular soil features, the post-fire differences were modified by advanced muck formation (moorshing) processes in the unburnt areas. Since the fire led to long lasting increase of fertility, the recovery of fen vegetation is unlikely.
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Abstract

This malacological analysis was conducted at a site with peat and calcareous tufas in Łapsze Niżne, Podhale (southern Poland). The study was carried out in 6 main and several complementary sections, in which 37 mollusc species were recognized represented by almost 11 000 specimens. The study enabled the reconstruction of environmental changes during the accumulation of the Holocene deposits (from the Boreal Phase till present). Conclusions drawn from these reconstructions were compared with results of malacological and palynological studies from other sites in Podhale. As a result, regional environmental reconstructions for the Holocene of the area were made. The specific composition, ecological structure and succession of molluscan assemblages from Łapsze Niżne indicate a significant role for local factors, thus demonstrating the variability of environmental conditions within a geographic region.
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Abstract

The aim of the research was to assess the microbiological (number of heterotrophic bacteria, actinobacteria and moulds) and biochemical (urease and acid phosphatase activity) state of peat with the admixture of composts produced from sewage sludge. An additional aim of the research was to demonstrate the influence of those substrates on the morphological traits of scarlet sage (height, number and length of shoots, number of buds and inflorescences, greenness index (SPAD)). Composts produced from sewage sludge, wheat, maize and lupine straw were mixed with peat, where their percentage varied from 25% to 75%. The substrate which included the composts applied in the experiment had a higher number of heterotrophic bacteria and a higher acid phosphatase activity level than the control substrate (peat). The multiplication of moulds and actinobacteria was more intensive than in the peat only in the combinations with K3 (sewage sludge 50%+sawdust 20%+ lupine straw 30%) and K4 (sewage sludge 50%+sawdust 20%+fresh maize straw 30%) composts, whereas the highest urease activity level was observed in the soils produced from K1 (sewage sludge 50%+sawdust 20%+white straw 30%) compost. The most optimal development of plants was observed in the substrate with compost produced from wheat straw. Composts produced from municipal sewage sludge were found to be suitable for growing scarlet sage. However, their effect depends on the percentage of high peat in the substrate.
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