Search results

Filters

  • Journals
  • Date

Search results

Number of results: 7
items per page: 25 50 75
Sort by:

Abstract

The church of Santa Cruz de Oleiros, Spain (1967) shows architect Miguel Fisac’s perception of sacred space after the Second Vatican Council. In this place of worship, the architect responded to the new liturgical guidelines combining geometry and architectural forms with the material of the moment, concrete. However, ordinary religious celebrations reveal acoustic deficiencies for the main use of the building. This fact is corroborated by acoustic measurements in situ. With a methodology that uses simulation techniques for the sound field, the analysis of the current acoustic behaviour of the room will serve as the basis for an acoustic rehabilitation proposal aimed at improving the acoustic conditions and so, the functionality of the church.
Go to article

Abstract

A new method for determining optimum dimension ratios for small rectangular rooms has been presented. In a theoretical model, an exact description of the room impulse response was used. Based on the impulse response, a frequency response of a room was calculated to find changes in the sound pressure level over the frequency range 20–200 Hz. These changes depend on the source and receiver positions, thus, a new metric equivalent to an average frequency response was introduced to quantify the overall sound pressure variation within the room for a selected source position. A numerical procedure was employed to seek a minimum value of the deviation of the sound pressure level response from a smooth fitted response determined by the quadratic polynomial regression. The most smooth frequency responses were obtained when the source was located at one of the eight corners of a room. Thus, to find the best possible dimension ratios, in the numerical procedure the optimal source position was assumed. Calculation results have shown that optimum dimension ratios depend on the room volume and the sound damping inside a room, and for small and medium volumes these ratios are roughly 1 : 1.48 : 2.12, 1 : 1.4 : 1.89 and 1 : 1.2 : 1.45. When the room volume was suitably large, the ratio 1 : 1.2 : 1.44 was found to be the best one.
Go to article

Abstract

Ray tracing simulation of sound field in rooms is a common tool in room acoustic design for predicting impulse response. There are numerous commercial engineering tools utilising ray tracing simulation. A specific problem in the simulation is the modelling of diffuse reflections when contribution of individual surface is prevailing. The paper introduces modelling of scattering which is interesting when the whole impulse response of a room is not a goal but contribution of certain surface. The main goal of the project is to shape directivity characteristics of scattered reflection. Also, an innovative approach is suggested for converting the energy histogram information obtained by ray tracing into an “equivalent impulse response”. The proposed algorithm is tested by comparing the results with measurements in a real sound field, realised in a scaled model where a diffusing surface is hardware-implemented.
Go to article

Abstract

A theoretical method has been presented to describe sound decay in building enclosures and to simulate the room impulse response (RIR) employed for prediction of the indoor reverberation characteristics. The method was based on a solution of wave equation having the form of a series whose time-decaying components represent responses of acoustic modes to an impulse sound source. For small sound absorption on room walls this solution was found by means of the method of variation of parameters. A decay function was computed via the time-reverse integration of the squared RIR. Computer simulations carried out for a rectangular enclosure have proved that the RIR function reproduces the structure of a sound field in the initial stage of sound decay suffciently well. They have also shown that band-limitedness of the RIR has evident influence on the shape of the decay function and predicted decay times.
Go to article

Abstract

The cuboidal room acoustics field is modelled with the Fourier method. A combination of uniform, impedance boundary conditions imposed on walls is assumed, and they are expressed by absorption coefficient values. The absorption coefficient, in the full range of its values in the discrete form, is considered. With above assumptions, the formula for a rough estimation of the cuboidal room acoustics is derived. This approximate formula expresses the mean sound pressure level as a function of the absorption coefficient, frequency, and volume of the room separately. It is derived based on the least-squares approximation theory and it is a novelty in the cuboidal room acoustics. Theoretical considerations are illustrated via numerical calculations performed for the 3D acoustic problem. Quantitative results received with the help of the approximate formula may be a point of reference to the numerical calculations.
Go to article

Abstract

Historic interiors with large cubature, such as reception, theatrical, and concert halls, need to be renovated periodically if they are to be preserved as cultural heritage for future generations. In such cases it is necessary to maintain appropriate balance between requirements imposed by heritage conservation authorities office which are usually being given a higher priority, applicable safety regulations, and the comfort of use, including good acoustics. The paper is a presentation of architectural interference in three historic interiors with large cubature leading to changes in their acoustic qualities. In two cases, the changes were beneficial to the functional qualities of the halls to satisfaction of the investors carrying out the renovation work. In the third instance, the architectural interference aimed at showing off the monumental valor of the interior resulted in significant degradation of its acoustics. To remedy the situation impairing the functional program of the facility, corrective measures are proposed neutral with respect to its historic character.
Go to article

This page uses 'cookies'. Learn more