Search results

Filters

  • Journals
  • Authors
  • Keywords
  • Date
  • Type

Search results

Number of results: 3
items per page: 25 50 75
Sort by:

Abstract

Incidence of colonic atresia in living infants ranges from 1:5,000 to 1:60,000 (average 1:20,000). It constitutes 1.8 to 15% of all cases of atresia of the gastrointestinal tract. In 58.56–75% of all cases is right-sided. We aim, through the presentation of two cases of colonic atresia which we encountered and after systematic research of the current literature, at addressing three major issues: diagnostic approach, operative strategy and management of the prognostic parameters of the colonic atresia. The common parameter in these two cases was the early diagnosis, which played a significant role in the uncomplicated postoperative course. The first case was a type I sigmoid atresia. Contrast’s escape during contrast enema examination due to accidental rupture of the distal part of the colon led to diagnosis. Side-to-side anastomosis, restoration of the rupture and a central loop sigmoidostomy were urgently performed. The second case was a type III atresia at the level of the ascending colon, which was early diagnosed via pregenital ultrasonography, in which colonic dilation was depicted. Restoration of the intestinal continuity early after birth was performed at a time. In conclusion, we believe that early diagnosis, selection of the appropriate operative strategy and prompt recognition of potential post-operative complications, especially rupture of the anastomosis, contribute to the optimization of the prognosis in patients with colonic atresia.
Go to article

Abstract

Meckel’s diverticulum represents a remnant of the proximal end of the omphalomesenteric duct, which constitutes a connection between the middle intestine and the vitelline vesicle. It is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract and is found in approximately 0.3–2% of the general population. Complications such as hemorrhage, bowel obstruction, infl ammation, perforation, intussusception, volvulus and malignant transformation develop in only 4–4.8% of all patients, with most cases presenting in childhood, while relative risk decreases during life. The aim of the present study is to present our experience in managing a 15-year old male patient with Meckel’s diverticulum covered perforation. It was a case of disguised perforation of the Meckel’s diverticulum, with development of adhesions to the anterior surface of the right third of the transverse colon, which was successfully treated on the basis of emergency. Diagnosis was made intraoperatively and was documented by histological examination of the excised diverticulum.
Go to article

This page uses 'cookies'. Learn more