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Number of results: 6
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Abstract

This report describes the isolation and characterization of bacterial isolates that produce anti−microbial compounds from one of the South Shetland Islands, King George Is − land, Antarctica. Of a total 2465 bacterial isolates recovered from the soil samples, six (BG5, MTC3, WEK1, WEA1, MA2 and CG21) demonstrated inhibitory effects on the growth of one or more Gram−negative or Gram−positive indicator foodborne pathogens ( i.e. Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Salmonella spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae , Enterobacter cloacae , Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Bacillus cereus ). Upon examination of their 16S rRNA sequences and biochemical profiles, the six Antarctic bacterial isolates were identified as Gram−negative Pedobacter cryoconitis (BG5), Pseudomonas migulae (WEK1), P. corrugata (WEA1) and Pseudomonas spp. (MTC3, MA2, and CG21). While inhibitors produced by strains BG5, MTC3 and CG21 were sensitive to protease treatment, those produced by strains WEK1, WEA1, and MA2 were insensitive to catalase, lipase, a −amylase, and protease enzymes. In addtion, the six Antarctic bacterial isolates appeared to be resistant to multiple antibiotics.
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Abstract

A filamentous benthic cyanobacteria, strain USMAC16, was isolated from the High Arctic Svalbard archipelago, Norway, and a combination of morphological, ultrastructural and molecular characterisation (16S rRNA gene sequence) used to identify to species level. Cell dimensions, thylakoid arrangement and apical cell shape are consistent with the Pseudanabaena genus description. The molecular characterisation of P. catenata gave 100% similarity with Pseudanabaena catenata SAG 1464-1, originally reported from Germany. Strain USMAC16 was cultured under a range of temperature and photoperiod conditions, in solid and liquid media, and harvested at exponential phase to examine its phenotypic plasticity. Under different culture conditions, we observed considerable variations in cell dimensions. The longest cell (5.91±0.13 μm) was observed at 15°C under 12:12 light:dark, and the widest cell (3.24±0.06 μm) at 4°C under 12:12 light: dark in liquid media. The study provides baseline data documenting the morphological variation of P. catenata in response to changing temperature regimes.
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Abstract

Nitritation, the first stage of ammonia removal process is known to be limiting for total process performance. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) which perform this process are obligatory activated sludge habitants, a mixture consisting of Bacteria, Protozoa and Metazoa used for biological wastewater treatment. Due to this fact they are an interesting bacterial group, from both the technological and ecological point of view. AOB changeability and biodiversity analyses both in wastewater treatment plants and lab-scale reactors are performed on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences using PCR-DGGE (Polymerase Chain Reaction – Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) as a molecular biology tool. AOB researches are usually led with nested PCR. Because the application of nested PCR is laborious and time consuming, we have attempted to check the possibility of using only first PCR round to obtain DGGE fingerprinting of microbial communities. In this work we are comparing the nested and non-nested PCR-DGGE monitoring of an AOB community and presenting advantages and disadvantages of both methods used. The experiment revealed that PCR technique is a very sensitive tool for the amplification of even a minute amount of DNA sample. But in the case of nested-PCR, the sensitivity is higher and the template amount could be even smaller. The nested PCR-DGGE seems to be a better tool for AOB community monitoring and complexity research in activated sludge, despite shorter fragments of DNA amplification which seems to be a disadvantage in the case of bacteria identification. It is recommended that the sort of analysis approach should be chosen according to the aim of the study: nested-PCR-DGGE for community complexity analysis, while PCR-DGGE for identification of the dominant bacteria.
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Abstract

This project aimed to isolate and characterize volcanic soil Actinobacteria from Deception Island, Antarctic. A total of twenty−four Actinobacteria strains were isolated using four different isolation media (Starch casein agar, R2 agar, Actinomycete isolation agar, Streptomyces agar) and characterized basing on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Tests for secondary metabolites were performed using well diffusion method to detect antimicrobial activities against eight different pathogens, namely Staphyloccocus aureus ATCC 33591, Bacillus megaterium , Enterobacter cloacae , Klebsiella oxytoca , S. enterica serotype Enteritidis, S. enterica serotype Paratyphi ATCC 9150, S. enterica serotype Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and Vibrio cholerae . Antimicrobial properties were detected against Salmonella paratyphi A and Salmonella typhimurium at the concentration of 0.3092±0.08 g/ml. The bioactive strains were identified as Gordonia terrae , Leifsonia soli and Terrabacter lapilli. Results from this study showed that the soil of Deception Island is likely a good source of isolation for Actinobacteria. The volcanic soil Actinobacteria are potentially rich source for discovery of antimicrobial compounds.
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Abstract

Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria communities were evaluated in a completely mixed, laboratory scale membrane reactor (MBR) working under anoxic conditions for 5 months. The microorganisms in activated sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing 66-150 mg NH4 +-N/l. The age of the activated sludge in MBR was 50 days and the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 3.3 days. The estimation of the diversity and complexity of the AOB community together with the identification of the dominant bacteria in the activated sludge under anoxic conditions were performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and DNA sequencing. Molecular analysis of the microbial community carried out with two microbial molecular markers, 16S rRNA gene and amoA gene, suggested that nitrification was led by a Nitrosomonas-like species. In the biocenosis of the investigated bioreactor, oxygen was the crucial selective parameter. The results obtained in this work showed that amoA gene research is more suitable to study the stability and effectiveness of ammonia oxidation. This information emphasizes the necessity of the usage of molecular markers based on functional genes instead of ribosomal ones in order to present the actual state of the process performed in bioreactors. It was also stated that Nitrosomonas -like bacteria are able to perform nitritation even in anoxic environment, that is probably the reason why these bacteria are the most common AOB in different bioreactors.
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Abstract

This study characterizes mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) from selected unpolluted locations as well as subjected to industrial emissions. To determine the species of bacteria isolated from the roots of ectomycorrhizal pine and birch, a method based on the sequence analysis of a 16S rRNA gene was used. The isolated bacteria were initially characterized by available biochemical methods and phenotypic observation. On the selected bacteria representatives isolation of DNA was performed, on which the PCR reaction was carried out. In this way amplified samples were automatically sequenced and the obtained results were compared to public databases. Among the isolated bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 species were dominant.
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