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Abstract

One of the direct results of the collapse of the former USSR was the emergence of centrifugal ethnic minority nationalisms, which posed a threat to the stability of the then newly-established (or restored in the case of the Baltic democracies) states. In this context, one of the mechanisms introduced by the leading elites in several countries (e.g. Latvia, Ukraine, Estonia, the Russian Federation) in order to address the minority diversity issue, ensure stability, and gain international support (in the case of the Baltic states) was a cultural autonomy scheme, which has its origins in the ideas of the late 19th century Austro-Marxist school of thought. This model was successfully implemented once in the past, in inter-war Estonia. However, its modern application, even in cases when it does not just remain on paper (such as in Latvia and Ukraine), seems to serve other motives (e.g. a restitutional framework in Estonia, control of the non-titular minority elites in Russia) rather than the satisfaction of minority cultural needs, thus making cultural autonomy a dead letter.
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Abstract

Ascorbic acid is a well-known antioxidant found in plants. The content of ascorbic acid was assayed using a normal phase European Pharmacopoeia HPLC method for ascorbic acid in medicinal products. The content of ascorbic acid in herbs was calculated in % for absolutely dry drug. Ascorbic acid was not detected in the roots of Primula ueris, in aerial parts it was detected in flowers (0.43 +/- 0.034%), in blades (1.43 +/- 0.11%) and petioles (1.56 +/- 0.12%). In fresh leaves collected at weekly intervals the content of ascorbic acid varied from 1.19 to 2.39%, being highest from mid-May to mid-June. The fresh leaves contained 2.35 +/- 0.18% of ascorbic acid and when frozen its content was quite stable for one year. The content of ascorbic acid in dried leaves decreased more than ten times in three months, in twelve months it was less than 1/20th of the initial level. Compared to the analyzed common fresh fruits and salads (n = 10) the fresh leaves of common cowslip contained considerably more ascorbic acid. Commercial orange juices could be recommended as the most convenient source of ascorbic acid (8.6-50.4 mg/100 ml); 1-5 glasses of orange juice could fulfill the recommended daily intake of vitamin C (60 mg).
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