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Abstract

The international community anxiously awaited delivery of the advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on Kosovo’s declaration of independence, hoping it would clarify the controversial right of self-determination and the right of secession. Although it was hailed by many as a confirmation of both rights, the advisory opinion was disappointing regarding that part of the analysis which was based on general international law. The ICJ interpreted the question posed in a very narrow and formalistic way. It concluded that declarations of independence (not their consequences) are not in violation of international law, but it did not rule that they are in accordance with international law, as was requested in the posed question. The ICJ refused to examine whether there is a positive entitlement to secession under international law. Although Kosovo and its supporters claimed that the case of Kosovo is unique and will not set a precedent, Russia used the case of Kosovo and the advisory opinion to justify the so-called referendum in Crimea and the subsequent incorporation of Crimea into Russia. However, the situation in Crimea is only superficially comparable to Kosovo and the advisory opinion gives little or no support in the case of Crimea
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Abstract

This paper describes the characteristic lexicon in the Devic’ katastichos, the monastery book of the monastery Devic in the vicinity of the town of Srbica in Kosovo and Metohija. In this book, the priests wrote down the gifts that the believers gave them from 1762 to 1789. Based on the name of the believers, the names of the places from which they originated, their professions, based on the list of gifts to the monastery, the measurements determining the weight, volume or length of gifts, a clear picture can be formed about the dynamic life of Serbs in Kosovo and Metohija during the 18th century, as well as the active life of Devic Monastery, to which the gifts were donated by the Orthodox Serbs, and also by the Albanians. According to the 2011 census, there are no more Serbs in Srbica, and the Monastery Devic was damaged in both World Wars and was burned down in 1999 and 2004. The work is dedicated to the celebration of eight centuries of autocephality of Serbian Orthodox Church (1219–2019), and consequently the autonomy the Serbian education, science, art and the entire spiritual life of Serbs, whose origins are related specifically to Kosovo and Metohija.
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