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Abstract

In this paper some issues of the transition process from air- to oxy-combustion were investigated. Advantages of flexible combustion were described. Flexible combustion tests carried out at four European plants and five plants outside Europe of different scales of process and test parameters were presented. An analysis of the transition time from air to oxy-combustion of different laboratory and pilot scale processes was carried out. The “first-order + dead time” approach was used as a model to describe transition process. Transitional periods between combustion modes and characteristic parameters of the process were determined. The transition time depends not only on the facility’s capacity but also it is impacted by specific operational parameters.
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Abstract

Experimental investigations and numerical simulations have been conducted in this study to derive and test the values of kinetic parameters describing oxidation and gasification reactions between char carbon and O2 and CO2 occurring at standard air and oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Experiments were carried out in an electrically heated drop-tube at heating rates comparable to fullscale pulverized fuel combustion chambers. Values of the kinetic parameters, obtained by minimization of the difference between the experimental and modeled values of char burnout, have been derived and CFD simulations reproducing the experimental conditions of the drop tube furnace confirmed proper agreement between numerical and experimental char burnout.
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Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate combustion characteristics of biomass (willow, Salix viminalis) burnt in air and O2/CO2mixtures in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB). Air and oxy-combustion characteristics of wooden biomass in CFB were supplemented by the thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TGA/DTA). The results of conducted CFB and TGA tests show that the composition of the oxidizing atmosphere strongly influences the combustion process of biomass fuels. Replacing N2in the combustion environment by CO2caused slight delay (higher ignition temperature and lower maximum mass loss rate) in the combustion of wooden biomass. The combustion process in O2/CO2mixtures at 30% and 40% O2is faster and shorter than that at lower O2concentrations.
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Abstract

Oxy-fuel combustion (OFC) belongs to one of the three commonly known clean coal technologies for power generation sector and other industry sectors responsible for CO2emissions (e.g., steel or cement production). The OFC capture technology is based on using high-purity oxygen in the combustion process instead of atmospheric air. Therefore flue gases have a high concentration of CO2- Due to the limited adiabatic temperature of combustion some part of CO2must be recycled to the boiler in order to maintain a proper flame temperature. An integrated oxy-fuel combustion power plant constitutes a system consisting of the following technological modules: boiler, steam cycle, air separation unit, cooling water and water treatment system, flue gas quality control system and CO2processing unit. Due to the interconnections between technological modules, energy, exergy and ecological analyses require a system approach. The paper present the system approach based on the 'input-output' method to the analysis of the: direct energy and material consumption, cumulative energy and exergy consumption, system (local and cumulative) exergy losses, and thermoecological cost. Other measures like cumulative degree of perfection or index of sustainable development are also proposed. The paper presents a complex example of the system analysis (from direct energy consumption to thermoecological cost) of an advanced integrated OFC power plant.
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