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Abstract

Wind constitutes one of the major environmental factors affecting the design and performance of built environment. Each country has its unique climatic wind conditions, and the way in which these are considered and implemented in the structural design, is important. An implementation or adoption of any new engineering design stipulations introduces a formidable challenge to the developers of the standards and the design profession. This has been experienced in some of the countries (e.g. the UK, Australia and the USA), where processes of modernising the outdated codifi cation took place in the past. Although both Poland and South Africa are currently at the early implementation stage of the new wind loading design stipulations, there is a major difference between the circumstances of the two countries. Poland, as an EU member state, has a compulsory obligation to adopt the new uniform standarisation requirements, within a stipulated time-frame. The South African code developers, after a thorough investigation process which will be highlighted in the paper, decided voluntarily to adopt the Eurocode as the primary model document.
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Abstract

In the paper, the authors discuss the construction of a model of an exemplary urban layout. Numerical simulation has been performed by means of a commercial software Fluent using two different turbulence models: the popular k-ε realizable one, and the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM), which is still being developed. The former is a 2-equations model, while the latter – is a RSM model – that consists of 7 equations. The studies have shown that, in this specific case, a more complex model of turbulence is not necessary. The results obtained with this model are not more accurate than the ones obtained using the RKE model. The model, scale 1:400, was tested in a wind tunnel. The pressure measurement near buildings, oil visualization and scour technique were undertaken and described accordingly. Measurements gave the quantitative and qualitative information describing the nature of the flow. Finally, the data were compared with the results of the experiments performed. The pressure coefficients resulting from the experiment were compared with the coefficients obtained from the numerical simulation. At the same time velocity maps and streamlines obtained from the calculations were combined with the results of the oil visualisation and scour technique.
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