Nauki Biologiczne i Rolnicze

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Zawartość

Journal of Plant Protection Research | 2004 | vol. 44 | No 4 |

Abstrakt

The object of the studies conducted in the years 2000–2002 on a field of 3 years’ monoculture of soybean was rhizosphere soil of soybean cultivated after tansy phacelia, winter wheat, white mustard, rye, agrimony and soybean as previous crops. The purpose of the studies was to determine the effect of cultivating the above listed previous crop plants on the formation of microorganism communities in the rhizosphere soil of soybean. The lowest total number of fungal colonies was found in the rhizosphere soil of soybean cultivated after rye and winter wheat (21.09 × 103 and 22.58 × 103 c. f. u., respectively), while the highest number was found in soil after soybean (36.95 × 103 c. f. u.). The highest total number of bacteria was found in 1 g of dr yweight of the rhizosphere soil of so ybean cultivated after agrimony, and the lowest after soybean (5.80 × 106 and 4.09 × 106 c. f. u., respectively). The largest proportion of pathogenic fungi was characteristic of the rhizosphere soil of soybean cultivated after soybean, and the smallest – of the rhizosphere soil of soybean after agrimony as a previous crop. The dominating species among pathogenic fungi in all experimental objects was Fusarium oxysporum. The rhizosphere soil of soybean cultivated after soybean was the poorest in saprophytic fungi (35.2% of all isolations). On the other hand, the highest number of saprophytes, including antagonistic ones, was found in the rhizosphere soil of soybean after agrimony and winter wheat.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Monika Bełkot
Danuta Pięta

Abstrakt

The fungi that cause sooty blotch grow only on the apple skin, so they use appropriate nutrients which are present on the fruit surface. It has been shown that when the first symptoms of sooty blotch occur a noticeable increase of glucose and fructose content both on the apple skin and in juice is observed. Such increase occurs at pH 4.4. An effect of surface glucose and fructose on the growth of patho- gens responsible for the disease was also confirmed by evaluating the germination of conidia of Phialophora sessilis de Hoog and Peltaster fructicola Jonhson in solution of above mentioned sugars, distilled water and standard d-glucose solutions.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Beata Wrona
Marek Grabowski

Abstrakt

Investigations have been undertaken to determine which fungi species are responsible for occurrence of sooty blotch disease in Poland. It was found that disease complex is caused by Tripospermum myrti (Lind) Hughes, Phialophora sessilis de Hoog and Peltaster fructicola Jonhson. There was no evidence of the presence fun- gus described as Gloedes pomigena which was previosly considered as a casual agent of apple sooty blotch disease in Poland.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Beata Wrona
Marek Grabowski

Abstrakt

In 1993–1995 from the cabbage aphid colonies, fed on nine different varieties of Brassica oleracea L. syrphid larvae and pupae were collected. The remaining emerged adults of Syrphidae were classified to eight species. The parasitization varied within the years of observation and oscillated from 14,4% to 46,4%. Four parasitic Hymenoptera: Diplazon laetatorius (F.), Diplazon sp., Pachyneuron grande (Thoms.), and Syrphophagus aeruginosus (Dalm.) were reared. The parasitoids identified belong to the following three families Ichneumonidae, Pteromalidae, and Encyrtidae. The largest group of reared parasitoids belonged to the family Ichneumonidae of which the most frequent was Diplazon laetatorius (F.). It occurred in each year of observations. The parasitization by D. laetatorius reached 21,7%.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Beata Jankowska

Abstrakt

Changes in production methods of Ericaceae ornamental plants could have caused them to become more vulnerable to weak pathogens. The aim of this study was to investigate the casual agent of Ericaceous plant damage. Plants and peat substrate were collected from two nurseries near Poznań. After isolation on agar medium and fulfilling Koch postulates it was found that the casual agent of Ericaceae ornamenta lp lant damage was Pestalotiopsis sydowiana (Bresadole) B.C. Sutton, a new species noted in Poland.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Dorota Remlein-Starosta

Abstrakt

In the years 2002–2004 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis and 37 species of entomopathogenic fungi were isolated and identified in the Polish and Belarussian parts of Białowieża Forest (BF). Mitosporic fungi and bacteria dominated in litter sperficial soil layer, forest, litter and floor vegetation whereas entomophtoralen fungi prevailed in bushy undergrowth layers and tree crowns. The dominant species Beauveria bassiana was observed in forest floor, subcortical habitats on dead trees, meadows and rushes. The species Entomophthora israelensis, Beauveria cf. bassiana, Paecilomyces suffultus and P. tenuipes were for the first time described as insect pathogens in BF. Entomophthorales seem to hold much greater part than mitosporic forms in the whole diversity of entomopathogenic fungi. Relatively rich sets of these fungi recognised in BF during last decades confirm the predestination of this area as highly significant refuge for other groups of arthropod pathogens, and it should encourage scientists to widen their research and contribute to a rather scarce knowledge in this field.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Danuta Sosnowska
Stanisław Bałazy
Ludmila Prishchepa
Natalia Mikulskaya

Abstrakt

In the field experiments performed in 1999–2001 the profitability of late blight control in accordance with three decision support systems: NegFry, Simphyt and Stephan with routine fungicide program was compared. Potato protection carried out according to the recommendations of the decision support systems guaranteed higher profitability of late blight control than when potato was protected routinely. The highest profitability was recorded for susceptible variety Bekas protected according to NegFr.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Andrzej Wójtowicz
Jerzy J. Lipa
Erich Jörg

Abstrakt

The intensity of Arion lusitanicus occurrence and the damage degree of 31 crop species have been estimated. It has been found that the slug damaged lettuce and cabbage plants very heavily (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata L., Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L. f. alba) and many species of other vegetables (Cucumis sativus L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., Raphanus sativus L. subvar. radicula Pers.). Plant damages in the edge strips were also observed on rape and barley plantations attacked by this slug. The moving activity of particular individuals of Arion lusitanicus was varying. Planning of the experiments in a nested block design has made it possible to statistically determine tendencies of the slug movement. It was observed that when some individuals remained at the point where they were initially placed, others, 2 hours after, moved over 7 m away. The mean weighed length of pathway covered by a single individual and the mean movement rate of one were estimated for each of 9 observation dates. It has been found that slugs penetrating the site surface under observation displayed their tendencies to move towards more moist places and towards food sources.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Maria Kozłowska
Jan Kozłowski

Abstrakt

Serious losses caused by root rot of sugar beet were observed in Poland in 2001 and 2002. The disease occurred in most of regions of sugar beet cropping from June to the end of growing season. Very high losses of yield were observed on many fields especially on cultivar Lolita in 2001. The aim of this work was to detect the casual agent of root rot (2001) and to compare susceptibility of sugar beet cultivars to this disease (2002–2003). The laboratory tests (2001) showed that most of destroyed roots were infected by Aphanomyces cochlioides Drechsler. This species is very well known as a pathogen of sugar beet seedling damping-off in Poland. The fungus Rhizoctonia solani Kühn was found only in 12% of rotten roots collected in south-eastern part of Poland. In field trails the highest number of infected roots and the highest infection inde xwere found for cultivar Arthur (2002–2003). That cultivar was significantly more susceptible to root rot than the rest of tested cultivars.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Jacek Piszczek

Abstrakt

Biological efficacy of herbicides: propoxycarbazone-sodium (Attribut 70 WG) and sulfosulfuron (Apyros 75 WG) applied with adjuvants was estimated in the field, greenhouse and laboratory experiments. An addition of adjuvants to herbicides Attribut 70 WG and Apyros 75 WG had a positive influence on physical characteristics of tank mixture, herbicidal effect, and the increase of winter wheat grain yield. Ammonium nitrate used as an adjuvant showed the weakest effect. The lowest grain yield was obtained after using the preparations Attribut 70 WG and Apyros 75 WG without adjuvant. Th eoil adjuvants, Adbios 85 SL, A ero 030 SL, Atpolan 80 EC and Olbras 88 EC influenced in a similar manner the activity of tested herbicides. Obtained herbicidal effect, the amount of yield and elements of yield structure were differentiated after joint application of herbicides with adjuvants. The herbicides protected plantations of winter wheat against couch grass (Agropyron repens) during the whole vegetative season. However the herbicide Attribut 70 WG was more effective in controlling regrowth of couch grass after harvest, as compared to Apyros 75 WG. On the other hand, Apyros 75 WG controlled somewhat better broadleaf weeds. Also differences in carryover effect occurred. On the sites after propoxycarbazone–sodium application winter oilseed rape, spring oilseed rape and sugar beet should not be cultivated. On the sites after cereals that were protected against weeds with sulfosulfuron only cultivation of winter oilseed rape should not be recommended, however spring oilseed rape and sugar beet can be grown

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Kazimierz Adamczewski
Adam Paradowski

Abstrakt

The influence of adjuvants on the efficacy of the plant growth regulators: chlormequat chloride (CCC) and prohexadione-calcium was investigated in winter wheat in 2002 and 2003. Field trials were carried out in the Agricultural Experimental Farm in Winna Góra. The plant growth regulators were applied alone at normal rate and at a r educed rate with and without adjuvants. Two adjuvants were used: Adpros 85 SL, a methylated rapeseed oil and Break-Thru S-240, an organosilicone surfactant. Crop height, lodging, yield and quality of the harvested crop were assessed. Physicochemical properties of spray solution were measured. Adjuvants improved the biological activity of both, CCC and prohexadione-calcium, especially when reduced doses were applied. Efficacy of the plant growth regulators used at normal rate without adjuvant and at reduced rates with adjuvants was similar. Break-Thru S-240 increased the efficacy of CCC and prohexadione-calcium more compared to Adpros 85 SL measured in terms of reduction of plant heigh.

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Stanisław Stachecki
Tadeusz Praczyk
Kazimierz Adamczewski

Redakcja

Editor-in-Chief Prof. Henryk Pospieszny Department of Virology and Bacteriology Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute Władysława Węgorka 20, 60-318 Poznań, Poland e-mail: H.Pospieszny@iorpib.poznan.pl Associate Editors Dr. Zbigniew Czaczyk (Agricultural Engineering) Poznan Univeristy of Life Sciences, Poznań, Poland Dr. Magdalena Jakubowska (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Sylwia Kaczmarek (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Piotr Kaczyński (Pesticide Residue) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Chetan Keswani (Biological Control) Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India Dr. Tomasz Klejdysz (Entomology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Franciszek Kornobis (Zoology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Karlos Lisboa (Biotechnology) Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Federal University of Alagoas, Alagoas, Brazil Dr. Vahid Mahdavi (Entomology) University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran Dr. Kinga Matysiak (Weed Science) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Yongzhi Wang (Virology and Bacteriology) Jilin Academy of Agricultral Sciences, Changchun, Jilin Province, China Dr. Przemysław Wieczorek (Biotechnology) Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute, Poznań, Poland Dr. Huan Zhang (Plant Pathology) Texas A&M University, Texas, USA Managing Editors Małgorzata Maćkowiak e-mail: m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl Monika Kardasz e-mail: m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl Proofreaders in English Delia Gosik Halina Staniszewska-Gorączniak Statistical Editor Dr. Jan Bocianowski Technical Editor Tomasz Adamski

Kontakt

Journal of Plant Protection Research

Institute of Plant Protection
National Research Institute
Władysława Węgorka 20
60–318 Poznań, Poland

tel.: +48 61 864 90 30
e-mail: office@plantprotection.pl

Managing Editors

Malgorzata Mackowiak
m.mackowiak@iorpib.poznan.pl

Monika Kardasz
m.kardasz@iorpib.poznan.pl

Instrukcje dla autorów

Instructions for Authors

Manuscripts published in JPPR are free of charge. Only colour figures and photos are payed 61.5 € per one colour page JPPR publishes original research papers, short communications, critical reviews, and book reviews covering all areas of modern plant protection. Subjects include phytopathological virology, bacteriology, mycology and applied nematology and entomology as well as topics on protecting crop plants and stocks of crop products against diseases, viruses, weeds, etc. Submitted manuscripts should provide new facts or confirmatory data. All manuscripts should be written in high-quality English. Non-English native authors should seek appropriate help from English-writing professionals before submission. The manuscript should be submitted only via the JPPR Editorial System (http://www.editorialsystem.com/jppr). The authors must also remember to upload a scan of a completed License to Publish (point 4 and a handwritten signature are of particular importance). ALP form is available at the Editorial System. The day the manuscript reaches the editors for the first time is given upon publication as the date ‘received’ and the day the version, corrected by the authors is accepted by the reviewers, is given as the date ‘revised’. All papers are available free of charge at the Journal’s webpage (www.plantprotection.pl). However, colour figures and photos cost 61.5 € per one colour page.

General information for preparing a manuscript

All text should be written in a concise and integrated way, by focusing on major points, findings, breakthrough or discoveries, and their broad significance. All running text should be in Times New Roman 12, 1.5 spacing with all margins 2.5 cm on all sides.

Original article

The original research articles should contain the following sections: Title – the title should be unambiguous, understandable to specialists in other fields, and must reflect the contents of the paper. No abbreviations may be used in the title. Name(s) of author(s) with affiliations footnoted added only to the system, not visible in the manuscript (Double Blind Reviews). The names of the authors should be given in the following order: first name, second name initial, surname. Affiliations should contain: name of institution, faculty, department, street, city with zip code, and country. Abstract – information given in the title does not need to be repeated in the abstract. The abstract should be no longer than 300 words. It must contain the aim of the study, methods, results and conclusions. If used, abbreviations should be limited and must be explained when first used. Keywords – a maximum of 6, should cover the most specific terms found in the paper. They should describe the subject and results and must differ from words used in the title. Introduction – a brief review of relevant research (with references to the most important and recent publications) should lead to the clear formulation of the working hypothesis and aim of the study. It is recommended to indicate what is novel and important in the study. Materials and Methods – in this section the description of experimental procedures should be sufficient to allow replication. Organisms must be identified by scientific name, including authors. The International System of Units (SI) and their abbreviations should be used. Methods of statistical processing, including the software used, should also be listed in this section. Results – should be presented clearly and concisely without deducting and theori sing. Graphs should be preferred over tables to express quantitative data. Discussion – should contain an interpretation of the results ( without unnecessary repetition) and explain the influence of experimental factors or methods. It should describe how the results and their interpretation relate to the scientific hypothesis and/or aim of the study. The discussion should take into account the current state of knowledge and up-to-date literature. It should highlight the significance and novelty of the paper. It may also point to the next steps that will lead to a better understanding of the matters in question. Acknowledgements – of people, grants, funds, etc. should be placed in a separate section before the reference list. The names of funding organizations should be written in full. References In the text, papers with more than two authors should be cited by the last name of the first author, followed by et al. (et al. in italics), a space, and the year of publication (example: Smith et al. 2012). If the cited manuscript has two authors, the citation should include both last names, a space, and the publication year (example: Marconi and Johnston 2006). In the Reference section, a maximum of ten authors of the cited paper may be given. All references cited in the text must be listed in the Reference section alphabetically by the last names of the author(s) and then chronologically. The year of publication follows the authors’ names. All titles of the cited articles should be given in English. Please limit the citation of papers published in languages other than English. If necessary translate the title into English and provide information concerning the original language in brackets (e.g. in Spanish). The list of references should only include works from the last ten years that have had the greatest impact on the subject. Older references can be cited only if they are important for manuscript content. The full name of periodicals should be given. If possible, the DOI number should be added at the end of each reference. The following system for arranging references should be used: Journal articles Jorjani M., Heydari A., Zamanizadeh H.R., Rezaee S., Naraghi L., Zamzami P. 2012. Controlling sugar beet mortality disease by application of new bioformulations. Journal of Plant Protection Research 52 (3): 303-307. DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/v10045-012-0049-9 Online articles Turner E., Jacobson D.J., Taylor J.W. 2011. Genetic architecture of a reinforced, postmating, reproductive isolation barrier between Neurospora species indicates evolution via natural selection. PLoS Genetics 7 (8): e1002204. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204 Books Bancrof J.D., Stevens A. 1996. Theory and Practice of Histological Techniques. 4th ed. Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, UK, 776 pp. Book chapters Pradhan S.K. 2000. Integrated pest management. p. 463-469. In: "IPM System in Agriculture. Cash Crop" (R.K. Upadhyaya, K.G. Mukerji, O.P. Dubey, eds.). Aditya Books Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, India, 710 pp. Online documents Cartwright J. 2007. Big stars have weather too. IOP Publishing PhysicsWeb. Available on: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002204

Tables, Figures, Phothographs, Drawings

Tables and figures should be uploaded as separated files at the submission stage. Their place in the manuscript should be clearly indicated by authors. Colour figures are accepted at no charge for the electronic version. In the hardcopy version of the journal, colour figures cost (65,5 € per one colour page). When attaching files please indicate if you want colour only in the online version or in both the online and the hardcopy. Photographs and RGB bitmaps should be provided in JPG or TIFF file format. They must have no less than 300 dpi resolution. The text column should be 8 cm wide and they must be at least 1000 pixels wide. Please send original (not resized) photograph(s), straight from a digital camera, without any text descriptions on the photo. Bitmaps combined with text object descriptions should be provided in MS Word or MS Powerpoint format. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Drawings should be provided in MS Word, MS Powerpoint, CorelDRAW or EPS file format and stored with original data file. Text objects using Arial font-face should be editable (changing font-face or font size). Charts (MS Excel graphs) should be provided in MS Excel file format, and stored with original MS Excel data file without captions but with the number of the figure attached. Please do not use bitmap fills for bar charts. Use colour fills only if necessary. Captions and legends should be added at the end of the text, referred to as "Fig." and numbered consecutively throughout the paper.

Rapid communications

Rapid communications should present brief observations which do not warrant the length of a full paper. However, they must present completed studies and follow the same scientific standards as original articles. Rapid communications should contain the following sections: Title Abstract - less than 300 words Key words - maximum 6 Text body Acknowledgements References The length of such submissions is limited to 1500 words for the text, one table, and one figure.

Reviews

Review articles are invited by the editors.Unsolicited reviews are also considered. The length is limited to 5000 words with no limitations on figures and tables and a maximum of 150 references. Mini-Review articles should be dedicated to "hot" topics and limited to 3000 words and a maximum two figures, two tables and 20 references.

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