Medical sciences

Folia Medica Cracoviensia

Content

Folia Medica Cracoviensia | 2021 | Vol. 61 | No 4 |

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Abstract

The complex course of the COVID-19 and the distant complications of the SARS-CoV-2 infection still remain an unfaded challenge for modern medicine. The care of patients with the sympto-matic course of COVID-19 exceeds the competence of a single specialty, often requiring a multispecialist approach. The CRACoV-HHS (CRAcow in CoVid pandemic — Home, Hospital and Staff) project has been developed by a team of scientists and clinicians with the aim of optimizing medical care at hospital and ambulatory settings and treatment of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The CRACoV project integrates 26 basic and clinical research from multiple medical disciplines, involving different populations infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus and exposed to infection.
Between January 2021 and April 2022 we plan to recruit subjects among patients diagnosed and treated in the University Hospital in Cracow, the largest public hospital in Poland, i.e. 1) patients admitted to the hospital due to COVID-19 [main module: ‘Hospital’]; 2) patients with signs of infection who have been confirmed as having SARS-CoV-2 infection and have been referred to home isolation due to their mild course (module: ‘Home isolation’); 3) patients with symptoms of infection and high exposure to SARS- CoV-2 who have a negative RT-PCR test result. In addition, survey in various professional groups of hospital employees, both medical and non-medical, and final-fifth year medical students (module: ‘Staff’) is planned.
The project carries both scientific and practical dimension and is expected to develop a multidisciplinary model of care of COVID-19 patients as well as recommendations for the management of particular groups of patients including: asymptomatic patient or with mild symptoms of COVID-19; symptomatic patients requiring hospitalization due to more severe clinical course of disease and organ complications; patient requiring surgery; patient with diabetes; patient requiring psychological support; patient with undesirable consequences of pharmacological treatment.
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Authors and Affiliations

Wojciech Sydor
1 2
Barbara Wizner
3
Magdalena Strach
2
Monika Bociąga-Jasik
4 5
Krzysztof Mydel
6
Agnieszka Olszanecka
7
Marek Sanak
8 5
Maciej Małecki
9 5
Jadwiga Wójkowska-Mach
10
Robert Chrzan
11
Aleksander Garlicki
4 5
Tomasz Gosiewski
12 5
Marcin Krzanowski
13 5
Jarosław Surowiec
14 5
Stefan Bednarz
15 5
Marcin Jędrychowski
16 5
Tomasz Grodzicki
3 5
The CraCoV-HHS Investigators

  1. Center for Innovative Therapies, Clinical Research Coordination Center, University Hospital in Cracow, Poland
  2. Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
  3. Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
  4. Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
  5. Steering Committee of the CRACoV-HHS
  6. Deputy Director for Coordination and Development, University Hospital in Cracow, Poland
  7. Department of Cardiology, Interventional Electrocardiology and Hypertension, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
  8. 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
  9. Department of Metabolic Diseases and Diabetology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
  10. Chair of Microbiology, Medical Faculty, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
  11. Department of Radiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
  12. Department of Molecular Medical Microbiology, Chair of Microbiology, Medical Faculty, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland
  13. Department of Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, Jagiellonian University Medical College; Deputy Medical Director, University Hospital in Cracow, Poland
  14. Head of Quality, Hygiene and Infection Control Section at University Hospital in Cracow, Poland
  15. Head of Primary Care Unit at University Hospital in Cracow, Poland
  16. Director of University Hospital in Cracow, Poland
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Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) printed model of the renal vasculature shows a high level of accuracy of subsequent divisions of both the arterial and the venous tree. However, minor artifacts appeared in the form of oval endings to the terminal branches of the vascular tree, contrary to the anticipated sharply pointed segments. Unfortunately, selective laser sintering process does not currently permit to present the arterial, venous and urinary systems in distinct colors, hence topographic relationship between the vas-cular and the pelvicalyceal systems is difficult to attain. Nonetheless, the 3D printed model can be used for educational purposes to demonstrate the vast renal vasculature and may also serve as a reference model whilst evaluating morphological anomalies of the intrarenal vasculature in a surgical setting.
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Authors and Affiliations

Janusz Skrzat
1
Katarzyna Heryan
2
Jacek Tarasiuk
3
Sebastian Wroński
3
Klaudia Proniewska
4
Piotr Walecki
4
Michał Zarzecki
1
Grzegorz Goncerz
1
Jerzy Walocha
1

  1. Jagiellonian University Medical College, Department of Anatomy, Kraków, Poland
  2. AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Measurement and Electronics, Kraków, Poland
  3. AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Kraków, Poland
  4. Jagiellonian University Medical College, Department of Bioinformatics and Telemedicine, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

The need for mass population vaccination against Covid-19 poses a public health problem. Allergic symptoms occurring after the 1st dose of the vaccine may result in resignation from the admin-istration of the 2nd dose. However, the majority of patients with mild and/or non-immediate symptoms may be safely vaccinated. The only absolute contraindication to administration of the vaccine is an anaphylactic reaction to any of its ingredients. Polyethylene glycol (PEG), widely used as an excipient in various vaccines, is considered the primary cause of allergic reactions associated with administration of Comirnaty (Pfizer/BioNTech) and Covid-19 Vaccine (Moderna) vaccines. However, hypersensitivity to PEG reported to date seems very rare, considering its widespread use in multiple everyday products, including medicines and cosmetics. In the paper, current literature data describing mechanisms of hy-persensitivity reactions to PEG, their clinical symptoms and diagnostic capabilities are presented. Un-doubtedly, the issue of hypersensitivity to PEG warrants further research, while patients with the diagnosis require individual diagnostic and therapeutic approach.
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Authors and Affiliations

Maria Czarnobilska
1
Małgorzata Bulanda
2
Magdalena Kurnik-Łucka
1
Krzysztof Gil
1

  1. Department of Pathophysiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland
  2. Department of Clinical and Environmental Allergology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is one of the most studied procedures in medicine. Over the years, despite numerous scientific studies, changes in guidelines, refining algorithms, expanding the availability of resuscitation equipment and educating the public, it has not been possible to improve the results of treatment of patients after cardiac arrest. Only 10% of them survive until hospital discharge. There is a well-tested medical procedure, wide application of which could improve results of resuscitation. This procedure is open chest cardiac massage (OCCM).
OCCM is not a new technique, its use dates back to the nineteenth century, now it is reserved for patients sustaining trauma and those after surgical procedures. A number of experimental and clinical studies have proven its advantage over the currently preferred indirect massage (CCCM) also in the group of non- traumatic patients. Of course, OCCM is an invasive method with a number of possible complications accompanying surgical procedures, and its wide implementation would require a long-term training program, but it seems that it could be an impulse that would significantly improve survival in this group of patients.
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Authors and Affiliations

Jan Szpor
1
Barbara Uchańska
1
Janusz Andres
1

  1. Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

Background: Studies on the effect of root canal rinsing protocols on fiber post bonding to dentin are inconclusive. This study reports investigation of this topic. Objectives: to determine effects of irrigation protocol by means of a push-out test on the strength of adhesion between the post and dentin in an in vitro study.
Materials and Method: Thirty human single-rooted teeth were prepared using hand instruments and the step-back technique, filled with gutta-percha, sealed with AH Plus (Dentsply), and divided into three groups: A: rinsed with NaCl; B: rinsed with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX); C: not rinsed before cementa-tion of posts. The fiber posts were set using RelyX and Built-it. The tooth roots were sliced and the push- out test was performed. The area of contact between the post and dentin was calculated and the destroying force was established. The results were statistically analyzed.
Results: The mean adhesive strength was 10.69 MPa in group A, 16.33 MPa in group B, and 16.72 MPa in C. The adhesive strength in group B and C was statistically significantly higher than in group A (p = 0.0016, ANOVA).
Conclusion: Rinsing root canals with CHX seems to be the most effective method prior to setting a fiber post.
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Authors and Affiliations

Bartosz Ciapała
1
Krzysztof Górowski
2
Wojciech I. Ryniewicz
2
Andrzej Gala
2
Jolanta E. Loster
2

  1. Department of Integrated Dentistry, Institute of Dentistry, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland
  2. Department of Dental Prosthetics and Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

Balanitis Xerotica Obliterans is a chronic, progressive, sclerosing inflammation of unclear etiology. It involves the external genitalia of males and more specifically the prepuce and its frenulum, the glans, and the external urethral meatus while it may extend to the peripheral part of the urethra. Recent studies have noted an increasing incidence in the paediatric population. It is the most common cause of secondary (pathologic) phimosis. Even more, in boys with physiologic phimosis that does not respond to conservative treatment, Balanitis Xerotica Obliterans should be considered as the underlying condition. In this study, we present all the latest data and attempt to create a diagnostic and curative algorithm regarding this condition.
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Authors and Affiliations

Ioanna Gkalonaki
1
Michalis Anastasakis
1
Ioanna Sofia Psarrakou
2
Ioannis Patoulias
1

  1. First Department of Pediatric Surgery, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Greece, General Hospital “G.Gennimatas”, Thessaloniki, Greece
  2. Department of Pediatrics, General Hospital “G. Gennimatas”, Thessaloniki, Greece
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Abstract

Illnesses with aerosol mode of transmission dominate in the structure of infectious diseases. Influenced by natural, social and biological factors, epidemiological characteristics of the infectious diseases change, that’s why the objective of this research was to determine modern peculiar features of the epide-miological situation regarding viral infections with aerosol transmission in Ukraine. Influenza incidence ranged from 31.14‒184.45 per 100 thousand people, other acute respiratory viral infections from 13685.24‒ 18382.5. Epidemic process of measles was characterized by increasing incidence in 2018 and 2019. In Ukraine, there is a tendency to reduce the incidence of rubella and mumps (р <0.05). The positive effect of immunization on the incidence of mumps and rubella has been established. Vaccination against measles cannot be considered as evidence of immunity against measles. The demographic situation in Ukraine may indirectly influence the intensity of the epidemic situation of viral infections with aerosol transmission.
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Authors and Affiliations

Nina Malysh
1
Alla Podavalenko
2
Victoriya Zadorozhna
3
Svetlana Biryukova
4

  1. Department of Infectious Diseases with Epidemiology, Sumy State University, Sumy, Ukraine
  2. Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Occupational Diseases, Kharkiv Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Kharkiv, Ukraine
  3. SI «Institute of Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases named after L.V. Gromashevsky National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine», Kyiv, Ukraine
  4. Department of Microbiology, Bacteriology, Virology, Clinical and Laboratory Immunology, Kharkiv Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Kharkiv, Ukraine
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Abstract

An 11-year old boy presented with a blunt trauma in the right inguinal area after a bicycle accident. Initial clinical picture was indicative of decreased arterial blood supply to the right lower extremity and the diagnostic confirmation was made with a colour flow Doppler ultrasonography. During operative investigation, a thrombosis of the common femoral artery, 3.5 cm in length, was found. The thrombotic part of the femoral artery was removed and replaced with a venous graft taken from the major saphenous vein, before the saphenofemoral junction. Postoperative course was uneventful. Traumatic thrombosis of the common femoral artery as a result of a blunt trauma is very rare, as only 4 relevant cases have been described previously.
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Authors and Affiliations

Ioannis Patoulias
1
Ioannis Panopoulos
2
Georgios Pitoulias
3
Thomas Feidantsis
1
Dimitrios Patoulias
4

  1. First Department of Pediatric Surgery, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Greece, General Hospital “G. Gennimatas”, Greece
  2. Department of Pediatrics, General Hospital “G. Gennimatas”, Thessaloniki, Greece
  3. Department of Vascular Surgery, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Greece, General Hospital “G. Gennimatas”, Greece
  4. Second Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, General Hospital “Hippokration”, Greece

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Manuscripts will be considered for publication in the form of Original Articles or Reviews. Submitted work must comply with ethical policy, which is based on the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) guidelines on good publication. (http://publicationethics.org/). Only manuscripts that are previously unpublished, and are not offered simultaneously elsewhere will be considered.
SUBMISSION
Folia Medica Cracoviensia only accepts electronic submission via e-mail at folmedcrac@pan.pl. Manuscripts will be assigned a unique manuscript number that must be quoted in correspondence. Papers and Reviews are refereed by experts in the field; the Editors reserve the right to reject an article without review. Please submit your covering letter or comments to the Editor as well as the names of two potential referees (including name, affiliation, and e-mail address). Currently, Authors have the only option to publish their articles in printed version. The online version will be available soon.
Original Articles
Original Articles describe the results of basic or clinical studies. The length of all Original Articles is limited to 6000 words, excluding acknowledgements and disclosures, references, tables, figures, table legends and figure legends. Please limit the number of figures and tables to a maximum of eight (e.g. four figures and four tables). Color figures can be included as necessary; however authors will be charged a fee (for details please contact editorial office).
Review Articles
Topical reviews of basic or clinical areas are invited by the Editor. Manuscript length is limited to 5000 words and 50 references. All Review articles are subject to review.
Language
The Folia Medica Cracoviensia uses American spelling. Authors for whom English is a second language may choose to have their manuscript professionally edited before submission to improve the English.

The complete set of instructions for Authors can be downloaded here as a PDF file: http://www.fmc.cm-uj.krakow.pl/pdf/Author_Guidelines_Folia_2017_Jul_31_KG1.pdf

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