Humanities and Social Sciences

Rocznik Slawistyczny

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Rocznik Slawistyczny | 2022 | No LXXI

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Abstract

On 29 November 2021 Professor Wiesław Boryś passed away in Kraków. He was an eminent expert in Slavonic studies, Serbian‑Croatian studies, and Kaszubian studies, and a distinguished etymologist, dialectologist and lexicographer. Professor Wiesław Boryś was born on 4 January 1939 in the village of Bzin in Kielce region. In 1956 he started education at the Chair in Slavonic Studies of the Jagiellonian University. He obtained an MA in Serbian‑Croatian studies in 1961, and eight years later a PhD from the JU Faculty of Philology. In 1974 he earned the title of habilitated doctor, became an associate professor in 1987 and gained full professorship in 1993.
Professor Boryś was associated with the Polish Academy of Sciences since 1961. He initially worked in the Section of Old Polish Language and then, from 1969 until retirement, in the Department of Proto‑Slavic Language. In 1986–2008 he taught a range of courses at the JU Institute of Slavonic Studies.
The scholarly work of Professor Boryś was especially focused on diachrony – the history of Slavonic language and lexicon, historical and comparative grammar, etymology, and the reconstruction of Proto‑Slavic language – as well as dialectology. The development of his research interests was largely shaped by Serbian‑Croatian studies, particularly into Čakavian and Kajkavian dialects as well as his work at the Polish Academy of Sciences – Proto‑Slavic studies and later also Kashubian studies.
The achievements of Professor Boryś include the publication of about 200 scholarly works, including 8 single‑authored books and 16 co‑authored books (e.g. eight volumes of Słownik prasłowiański). The crowning achievement of his career was the publication of two lexicographic works: Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego, the first dictionary since the times of Aleksander Brückner to provide a generally available etymological compendium of the Polish language, and Słownik etymologiczny kaszubszczyzny, the world’s first etymological dialect dictionary in the field of Slavonic studies, consisting of six volumes written together with Professor Hanna Popowska‑Taborska.
The chief focus of Professor Boryś was the description of South Slavonic languages and dialects, especially Čakavian and Kajkavian dialects. He was one of the greatest experts in this field, which is reflected in several dozen articles as well as the books Budowa słowotwórcza rzeczowników w tekstach czakawskich XV i XVI w., Studia nad dialektem czakawskim Juraja Križanicia. Akcentuacja rzeczowników and Czakawskie studia leksykalne. Dziedzictwo prasłowiańskie w słownictwie czakawskim.
The late Professor Wiesław Boryś will always be remembered for his impressive scholarly achievements and kept in fond memory.
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Authors and Affiliations

Tomasz Kwoka
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Slavonic Studies, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

The article describes the author’s collaboration with professor Boryś on the publication of a six-volume “Dictionary of the Kashubian etymology” (Warszawa 1994–2010). In addition, the author briefly describes the achievements of the deceased Professor in the field of Slavic linguistics, focusing on the publication of “Dictionary of the etymological Polish language” (Krakow 2005) – an outstanding work on which the Professor worked for most of his life.
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Authors and Affiliations

Hanna Popowska-Taborska
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Instytut Slawistyki Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Warszawa (prof. em.)
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Abstract

The author discusses the importance of Wiesław Boryś' etymological dictionary of the Polish language for research on the semantic derivation in Polish and Macedonian conducted at the Research Center of Areal Linguistics at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Skopje.
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Authors and Affiliations

Zuzanna Topolińska
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Macedońska Akademia Nauk i Sztuk, Centrum Badawcze Lingwistyki Arealnej im. Božidara Vidoeskiego, Skopje
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Abstract

Prof. dr hab. Stanisław Stachowski was a distinguished scholar, linguist, lexicographer, Turkologist and Slavicist. He was associated with the Jagiellonian University – the institution in which he proceeded to develop his scholarly career, holding various administrative functions and educating successive generations of Slavicists and Turkologists.
He was the author of a few dozen of scholarly monographs, including, inter alia, works devoted to the Serbian-Croatian language, the Upper Sorbian language and as well as works associated with Turkic and Balkan studies.
He received many accolades for his scholarly contributions, including an award presented by the Minister of Education, the Gold Cross of Merit in 1976 and the Knight’s Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta in 1986, and a medal from the Minister of External Affairs of the Republic of Turkey for his distinguished contributions in 2018. He was a member of a number of scholarly committees of the PAN, and, since 1990, also of the prestigious Societas Uralo-Altaica. He held the position of the editor-in-chief of the scholarly periodicals, Folia Orientalia as well as Prace Językoznawcze. Zeszyty Naukowe UJ.
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Authors and Affiliations

Jordanka Georgiewa‑Okoń
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Kraków
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Abstract

Obituary of a famous philologist, linguist, Slavicist, retired professor of the Jagiellonian University. The exposé of his personality and also his scientific, didactical, and organizational achievements.
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Authors and Affiliations

Adam Fałowski
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Kraków
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Abstract

The article presents in a sketch of the history and the state of research of Polish etymological studies from Aleksander Brückner to Wiesław Boryś on the Slavic and Indo‑European background. The paper also discusses the different types of etymological dictionaries and suggests the directions of further research.
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Authors and Affiliations

Leszek Bednarczuk
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, Kraków
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Abstract

In the article the Slavic term * ǫb(ъ)lъ ‘source, spring; well’ is analyzed from the point of view of its word-formation and etymology. The discussion of preceding etymologies leads to the formulation of a new etymology, based on the internal analysis of * ǫ-b(ъ)lъ ‘source, spring; well’ as * n̥-bl̥o ‘unmuddy’ = ‘clear (water)’. The identified cognates in Baltic * balā, Germanic * pōla-, and possibly Continental Celtic * bolā, all ‘swamp, marsh’, imply the initial, ‘non-Indo-European’, * b-. Finally, it is tested, if the etymon could represent an extension in -l- from the root * gu̯ebh- ‘marsh, swamp’ in the zero-grade of ablaut. The answer is ‘yes’.
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Authors and Affiliations

Václav Blažek
1

  1. Department of Linguistics & Baltic Studies, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republik
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Abstract

The article attempts to consider issues related to the presence of various language varieties in Croatian literature – general/standard (native and foreign), regional (dialects, regiolects), social (sociolects). Focusing primarily on artistic narrative prose, the author tries to show how the heritage of centuries‑old multilingualism in the culture of Croatia translated into various stylistic phenomena, how it evolves and what consequences it may have not only for the language itself, but also for cultural phenomena. Thanks to this approach, an attempt is made to highlight the circumstances related to the choice of the Shtokavian dialect as the literary language in the 19th century.
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Authors and Affiliations

Maciej Czerwiński
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Slavonic Studies, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

The article opens a series of etymological research deal with selected lexical units with not clear etymology in the Polish language. Two lexemes - berek and zbereźnik are analysed in this paper. The first of them could be borrowed from Hebrew or may have an etymological connection with the verb brać. The second one, due to the phonetic feature (pleophony -ere-), probably comes from the Ukrainian language (cf. in Hutsul culture beréza means a main figure among carollers; the staroste (master of ceremonies) at the wedding’).
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Authors and Affiliations

Adam Fałowski
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Eastern Slavonic Studies, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

The paper focuses on the Old Polish word kryłos, which was attested twice in court records from Przemyśl in the 15th century. Some existing hypotheses about the word origin and meaning are mentioned, although it has not been discussed before in a satisfactory way. A detailed study of the word’s etymology (concerning Old Ukrainian, Old Russian and Greek) and a precise analysis of the attestations enables us to determine its meaning, different from the meaning proposed in the Dictionary of Old Polish ( Słownik staropolski).
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Authors and Affiliations

Jan German
1

  1. Doctoral School in the Humanities, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland (PhD Student)
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Abstract

The aim of my paper is to distinguish groups of semantic motivations that have become the basis for the formation of words or word associations expressing obviousness. The study covered various European languages with particular emphasis on the Slavic languages. On the basis of the research, the following groups were distinguished: 1) knowledge and understanding; 2) sight, perception and clearness; 3) talking and adjudication; 4) nature; norm and custom; 5) consequence; 6) confidence, trust and security.
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Authors and Affiliations

Mariola Jakubowicz
1

  1. The Institute of Slavic Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland
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Abstract

In the recent years the employees of the Research Center for Areal Linguistics at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts have been working on a new approach for the description of the word formation system in the Macedonian language. The approach consists of researching groups of lexemes derived from the same root attested in the Proto‑Slavic language. According to Markovikj and Topolińska (2019), one of the most important processes that present the systematic transfer of information from the semantic continuum to the lexicon of the language is the semantic derivation. This process allows the observation of the associative sequences, which retain the basic, initial semantic components, transmitted from the man and from the real physical world to the human mental world. In this paper, the author analyzes the formal and the semantic derivation of the Proto‑Slavic root * gor‑ in the Macedonian language, which has developed several variations since the Proto‑Slavic period. The analysis of the initial semantics of the word forms derived from the root * gor‑ and its variations, showed that they all share a common semantic concept ‘covered by fire’, which refers to the inseparable relationship between man and nature.
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Authors and Affiliations

Davor Jankuloski
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Research Center for Areal Linguistics „Božidar Vidoeski”, Skopje, North Macedonia
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Abstract

The article presents a new etymology of the Old Czech noun obudoň, listed in Klaret's Latin‑Czech dictionary "Glosář", in which he translates the Latin name of the plant mixalia ʽCordia myxaʼ. The etymology presented by us understands obudoň as a deverbative from the verb obuditi, a continuant of the Proto‑Slavonic verb * ob‑vǫditi (sę), in Czech with the ‑v‑ displaced. The Proto‑Slavonic verb * vǫditi is a causative from * vędnǫti ʽto wither, to dry’; the Old Czech obudoň could thus get its name in connection with the fact that in Europe the sebesten fruits were known only as dried.
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Authors and Affiliations

Ilona Janyšková
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Czech Language Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Department of Etymology, Brno, Czech Republic
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Abstract

A reading of the etymologies suggested by Wiesław Boryś, both in lexica and in numerous articles, makes us realize in a particularly acute manner the incompatibility of our linguistic competence in the evaluation of the motivation relations of Old Polish derivatives. The problem that was put forward was illustrated on the basis of Old Polish noun derivatives with the prefix wą‑ ( wądół, wąwał, wątok), the nominal equivalent of the verbal vъn‑/* vъ‑ (the PIE *on before a consonant yielded ϙ). In the Old Polish material there are also numerous lexemes structured on the basis of the Proto‑Slavic * ‑ϙtr‑/ ‑ętr‑, preceded by the syllable‑onset wn‑, which indicated an internal location ( wnątrz, wnętrze, wnętrek, wnętrzny etc.). The Old Polish lexemes with wą‑ and wn‑+‑ ϙtr‑/ ‑ętr‑ that were described compel us to put forward a legitimate thesis that our ancestors perceived them in a different manner than the modern users of the Polish language, that they were aware of word‑formative divisibility. They perceived them as nouns which originated on the basis of prepositional expressions, therefore they should be classed under the following heading: Derivatives formed on the basis of expressions with the preposition w‑ / wn‑ / ‑.
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Authors and Affiliations

Krystyna Kleszczowa
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. The Institute of Polish Studies, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
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Abstract

In the introductory part of the article, the author discusses Slovak dial. pomidlo ‘plum jam; tree gum’ (Šariš region, north‑east Slovakia) which, in his opinion, is a corruption of an original * povidlo. It is not clear whether the Slovak word is a native cognate of Polish powidła ‘sort of jam (made mostly from plums)’ and Czech povidla ‘id.’; it might also be a local loanword of Polish origin. The author subsequently gives a survey of the existing attempts at etymological interpretation of the aforementioned Polish and Czech lexemes. According to W. Boryś, they go back to * povidlo as an original nomen instrumenti derived from * po‑viti (prefixal derivative of Proto‑Slavic * viti ‘twist, wind’, probably also used to denote the circular movements made with a spoon, etc. while constantly stirring the boiling fruit mass); the original meaning should thus be reconstructed as ‘jam made with the use of a * povidlo (stirring instrument)’. The author of the present study interprets the proto‑form * povidlo as a nomen actionis (i.e., ‘the action of stirring’) which underwent a further semantic shift ‘nomen actionis’ > ‘nomen acti (nomen resultati)’, i.e. ‘(the action of) stirring’ > ‘jam (made by stirring the fruit mass)’; cf. Russian varen'e ‘preserve, jam, confiture’ < ‘(the action of) cooking’.
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Authors and Affiliations

Ľubor Králik
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Ľudovít Štúr Institute of Linguistics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia
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Abstract

The aim of the article is to describe the semantics and origin, noted in ethnographic works from Polesie, of the beekeeping terms pczòły pàszut, pasznià ‘to bear benefit (pożytek), to work about the bee’. On the basis of historical materials of East Slavic languages and previous etymological hypotheses, the article relates the meaning of the described terms to the verb pachać ‘to plow; to create, to work’, recognizing it as a semantic archaism. The work also verifies the origin of the form pasznia in Old Polish lexis, recognizing it as a Beloruthenism.
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Authors and Affiliations

Agata Kwaśnicka‑Janowicz
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Department of Language History and Dialectology, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

The article is devoted to the analysis of the meaning of the Old Polish lexeme gędźba, which was inherited from the Proto‑Slavic * gǫdьba against the background of its equivalents in Old Bohemian and Old Russian. The inspiration was the text of prof. W. Boryś on the Proto‑Slavic musical vocabulary. Semantic analysis has shown that in Old Polish, Old Bohemian and Old Russian languages, the continuants of the Proto‑Slavic * gǫdьba had a meaning limited to playing a specific type of instrument, as in Proto‑Slavic. So the words did not refer to the notion of music in the general sense, but only to a certain part of it. This testifies to the absence of a general notion of music in the Middle Ages in the Polish language area and is a continuation of the original Slavic state. But the old concept, which was called gędźba, had some characteristics that have been transfered to the later concept „music”, called a new word borrowed from the Latin.
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Authors and Affiliations

Beata Raszewska‑Żurek
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Chair of General and Indoeuropean Linguistics, Institute of Linguistics, Translation and Hungarian Studies, Faculty of Phililogy, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

The article deals with West Slavonic words on cud represented by verbs such as Old Czech cúditi, Polish cudzić or adjectives such as Czech cudný, Polish cudny, czudny. These words are not etymologically clear, and the etymological dictionaries suggest different solutions, either considering these words as cognates or looking for other etymological connections. More light on the issue could be thrown by Old Church Slavonic študь ‘custom, manners, morals’ which has not been taken into account so far while reflecting the etymologies of the abovementioned words. Old Church Slavonic word corresponds to older Czech cud ‘discipline, good manners’ and this noun (in its late Proto Slavonic form) can be taken as a basis for the verb (Old Czech cúditi etc.) in the meaning ‘to clean, brush, remove’ and the adjective (Czech cudný etc.) in the meaning ‘chaste, modest, moral’. The Proto Slavonic root of the word can be reconstructed as * tjud from Pre Slavonic * teud which can be traced back to Indo European * teuH ‘to protect, friendly give one’s mind to sb.’. Nominal derivatives of this root offer striking semantic parallels in Germanic: Old English geđiede ‘good, decent, chaste’, đēaw ‘custom, manners, morals’, Old High German, Old Saxon thau ‘discipline’.
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Authors and Affiliations

Jiří Rejzek
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Charles University, Institute of Czech Language and Theory of Communication, Prague, Czech Republic
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Abstract

The text discusses the question of Polish and Eastern Slavic origin of the words: (h)uzer, uzior ‘lower part of a sheaf of corn’, huzica ‘bird's rump’, huzno ‘bird's rump’. The relic forms of words * gǫzyrь, * gǫzerь with a nasal vowel can be found in the dialects of Southern Borderlands and in Chełm region. In this area they were originally shared by Polish and Ruthenian languages. Forms containing u: * guzуrь, * guzerь appearing in the Polish language should be ascribed to the mutual impact of Ruthenian languages, even though they may have been originally Polish, too. The influence of the Ruthenian language is evident in the commonplace h‑ (< g) in word‑initial position, e.g. huzno, huzica, huzer, huzir, etc., as well as in infrequent shift towards u̯ and v, e.g. u̯uźor, u̯uźoro, vuźur. The occasional g in Eastern Slavic vernacular languages of the Białystok region – guzerye, due to the opaque formation, does not seem a manifestation of phonetic Polonization.
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Authors and Affiliations

Dorota Krystyna Rembiszewska
1
ORCID: ORCID
Janusz Siatkowski
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. The Institute of Slavic Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland
  2. University of Warsaw, Institute of Western and Southern Slavic Studies, Warszawa, Poland (em.)
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Abstract

The subject of the article is the Italian influence on Croatian phonotactics. Selected issues concerning the distribution of consonants from the Čakavian dialect and na našu – the dialect of Croatian villages in Italy – are discussed in the article.
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Authors and Affiliations

Irena Sawicka
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. The Institute of Slavic Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa, Poland
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Abstract

Generally only one aspect of Slavic‑Turkish language contact has regularly been discussed in linguistics, viz. the Turkish influence on Slavic vocabulary. Results of impact in the opposite direction, i.e. Slavic loanwords in Turkish are only sporadically the subject of linguistic investigation. The present paper brings a collection of Slavic words in two Turkish dialects in western Bulgaria. Even this modest set of words clearly shows differences between the two areas. Suffice it to say that only two words in this collection, kr(ă) čma ‘inn, tavern’ and pux ‘down, pile, floccus, undercoat’, are attested both in the northern and the southern part of western Bulgaria.
The paper is of experimental character. Its aim is to see how Slavic loanwords in Turkish dialects in the Balkans (using the example of western Bulgaria) can be presented in a comparative dictionary.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marek Stachowski
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Slavonic Studies, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

The author states that a “biography” of a language presents de facto its capability to adapt to natural and/or man‑made changes in the environment of the community speaking the language in question.
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Authors and Affiliations

Zuzanna Topolińska
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts–MANU, Research Center for Areal Linguistics „Božidar Vidoeski”, Skopje, North Macedonia
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Abstract

The aim of this article is a semantic and formal analysis of the name wrotycz and related names in Polish dialects against the Slavic background. The history and etymology of these names as well as their semantic motivation are presented. All names are based on the Proto‑Slavic causativum * vortiti ‘to make something spin, to turn’ due to assigning tansy a magical power that was generally meant to reverse bad things and restore good things. Everything indicates that the form * vortyčь is Proto‑Slavic, and this proves that the Slavs from ancient times treated tansy as an apotropaic plant.
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Authors and Affiliations

Jadwiga Waniakowa
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of the Polish Language of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

As in the first part I (Warsaw 2018) the main research goal of the authors is distinguishing East Slavic borrowings from Polish archaisms. These units could be explained as a parallel, convergence, or Polish and Ruthenian neologisms in the Polish language area as a consequence of interference. The detailed and comprehensive analysis considering geographic, chronological and etymological aspects of the selected lexical items, allowed the authors to establish the provenance of the researched vocabulary in a precise and reliable way. The paper is exemplary both in terms of content and applied methodology.
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Authors and Affiliations

Adam Fałowski
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Eastern Slavonic Studies, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

The volume Slavic Languages Today: Categories, Structures and Processes is a festschrift dedicated to Professor Małgorzata Korytkowska. Thematically it also partly stems from her works but encompasses a slightly wider scope of linguistic issues, including semantics, syntax, word formation, contrastive studies, lexicology and lexicography, language resources and translation studies. Separate chapters describe these issues in respect to modern Slavic languages and sometimes in comparison within the group. The volume contains twenty two interesting contributions and authored by renowned Slavists from Poland and abroad.
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Authors and Affiliations

Maryla Papierz
1

  1. Institute of Slavonic Studies, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland (em.)
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Abstract

The subject of this review is the monograph of Marta Vojteková on the new compounds with initial baseoids of foreign origin in contemporary Polish.
The author describes Polish lexicon occurring in the Polish press in 2001–2005 excerpted from the work by Teresa Smółkowa (ed.), Nowe słownictwo polskie. Materiały z prasy lat 2001–2005. Vojteková presents the set of 276 baseoids occurring as the initial part of compounds gathered as a dictionary, which can serve as a starting point for the preparation new neological sources or for further linguistic research on baseoids.
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Authors and Affiliations

Sylwia Sojda
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. The Institute of Liguistics, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

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  13. Zgłoszenie artykułu do czasopisma jest jednoznaczne z wyrażeniem zgody na opublikowanie w wersji papierowej i elektronicznej (lub równoważnej).
  14. Redakcja nie odsyła tekstów niezamówionych.

ZALECENIA REDAKTORSKIE DOTYCZĄCE PRZYGOTOWYWANIA DO DRUKU ARTYKUŁÓW DO „ROCZNIKA SLAWISTYCZNEGO”

  1. Objętość artykułów przesyłanych do druku (łącznie z przypisami, bibliografią i streszczeniem) nie powinna przekraczać 20. stron znormalizowanego maszynopisu, a recenzji – 5. stron.
  2. W wypadku użycia znaków specjalnych (np. zapisów fonetycznych czy alfabetów niełacińskich) prosimy dołączyć plik z fontami oraz artykuł zapisany w formacie PDF (lub wydruk).
  3. Edytor: Word, tekst zapisany w formacie *.rtf lub *.doc. Plik proszę nazwać nazwiskiem autora (np.

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