Humanities and Social Sciences

Folia Orientalia

Content

Folia Orientalia | 2020 | vol. 57

Authors and Affiliations

Maciej Klimiuk
ORCID: ORCID
Anna Krasnowolska
Arkadiusz Płonka
Ewa Siemieniec-Gołaś
Lidia Sudyka
Joachim Śliwa
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The Arabic influence in West Africa has been studied from the perspectives of linguistics, anthropology, culture and religion. This paper will discuss both the common and divergent aspects of this influence, not only on linguistic material but also on anthropological data. This does not mean that only anthropological data has influenced the languages dealt with, but the donor language is also studied under the perspectives of what is transferred to the recipient. So, for example, Kanuri has been influenced by Arabic loan words for centuries, whereas all the minor languages in the wider Mega-Chad area and even in West Africa received Arabic loan words rather late. This gives us a kind of chronology whereby the linguae francae – simply because of their great numbers of speakers - cannot be neglected. An example is Hausa, which from its strong influence on other languages might be heavily responsible for that transmission. Another fact that cannot be ignored is the Fulfulde. Through their historical migrations over the whole Savanna belt of West Africa, they have been considered as carriers of Islam and thus, through the spread of Islam, have infiltrated the various ethnic groups with many loan words. Therefore this paper provides a concise overview of the work done so far on West African languages.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Sergio Baldi
1

  1. Università degli Studi di Napoli, L’Orientale
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The present study summarizes the anatomic lexicon of Beja, the only representative of the North Cushitic branch according to all relevant sources published during last two centuries. This dialectological material is compared with probable or possible counterparts in other Cushitic branches and further, in the Afroasiatic perspective, with Omotic, Chadic, Berber, Egyptian and Semitic lexical data, all in agreement with historical phonology formulated in Blažek 2007. Several etymological studies devoted to thematic parts of the Beja lexicon were already published: Fauna (Blažek 2003a), Kinship & Social terminology (Blažek 2003b), Natural Phenomena, Time and Geographical Terminology (Blažek 2005 & 2006).
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Václav Blažek
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Masaryk University, Brno

Authors and Affiliations

Gábor Takács
1 2 3
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Egyptian Language School at Balatonederics
  2. Department of Classical Philology, University of Łódź
  3. Member of the Associazione Internazionale di Studi sul Mediterraneo e l’Oriente, Roma

Instructions for authors

Instructions for Authors


Article submission

All articles, book reviews and editorial correspondence should be e-mailed to folia.orientalia@uj.edu.pl.

Folia Orientalia accepts contributions in English, French and German.

Articles and book reviews should be submitted in .doc/.docx and .pdf format, preferably in Charis SIL font ( https://software.sil.org/charis/). All characters/fonts not in the Unicode Standard should be sent as an attachment to the text.

All articles must include a title, an abstract in English (100–200 words), keywords (4–10), the main body of the text and a bibliography (see References). Please do not use capital letters in the titles of articles, chapters etc. and avoid overly sophisticated formatting.

Contributions sent to Folia Orientalia should not have been submitted to other journals or publishers, nor should they have been previously published elsewhere in any language. All articles should be based on original research.

Each article will be anonymously evaluated by a minimum of two independent reviewers.

Authors should provide their ORCID number.


References

Style sheet is based on the Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition (author and date).

- Journal article

Fox, Joshua. 1996. ‘A Sequence of Vowel Shifts in Phoenician and Other Languages’. Journal of Near Eastern Studies 55 (1): 37–47.
Intext citation: (Fox 1996: 37); Fox (1996: 37)
Footnote citation: Fox 1996: 37; Fox (1996: 37)

Mulder-Heymans, Noor. 2002. ‘Archaeology, Experimental Archaeology and Ethnoarchaeology on Bread Ovens in Syria’. Civilisations 49 (1–2): 197–221.
Intext citation: (Mulder-Heymans 2002: 198); Mulder-Heymans (2002: 198)
Footnote citation: Mulder-Heymans 2002: 198; Mulder-Heymans (2002: 198)

- Book and edited books

Lewin, Bernhard. 1966. Arabische Texte im Dialekt von Hama mit Einleitung und Glossar. Beiruter Texte und Studien 2. Beirut and Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner.
Intext citation: (Lewin 1966: 67); Lewin (1966: 67)
Footnote citation: Lewin 1966: 67; Lewin (1966: 67)

Fleck, Ludwik. 2019. Denkstile und Tatsachen: gesammelte Schriften und Zeugnisse. Edited by Sylwia Werner and Claus Zittel. 3rd ed. Suhrkamp Taschenbücher Wissenschaft. Berlin: Suhrkamp.
Intext citation: (Fleck 2019); Fleck (2019)
Footnote citation: Fleck 2019; Fleck (2019)

Caubet, Dominique, and Martine Vanhove, eds. 1994. Actes des premières journées internationales de dialectologie arabe de Paris. Colloque international tenu à Paris du 27 au 30 janvier 1993. Paris: INALCO, Publications Langues’O.
Intext citation: (Caubet and Vanhove 1994); Caubet and Vanhove (1994)
Footnote citation: Caubet and Vanhove 1994; Caubet and Vanhove (1994)

Holes, Clive, ed. 2018. Arabic Historical Dialectology: Linguistic and Sociolinguistic Approaches. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Intext citation: (Holes 2018); Holes (2018)
Footnote citation: Holes 2018; Holes (2018)

- Chapter in an edited book

Ullendorff, Edward. 1970. ‘Comparative Semitics’. In Current Trends in Linguistics: Volume 6. Linguistics in South West Asia and North Africa, edited by Thomas A. Sebeok, 261–73. The Hague-Paris: Mouton.
Intext citation: (Ullendorff 1970: 262); Ullendorff (1970: 262)
Footnote citation: Ullendorff 1970: 262; Ullendorff (1970: 262)

Khan, Geoffrey. 2011. ‘North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic’. In The Semitic Languages: An International Handbook, edited by Stefan Weninger, 708–24. Berlin and New York: de Gruyter Mouton.
Intext citation: (Khan 2011: 711); Khan (2011: 711)
Footnote citation: Khan 2011: 711; Khan (2011: 711)

- PhD thesis, MA thesis

Borg, Alexander. 1978. ‘A Historical and Comparative Phonology and Morphology of Maltese’. PhD Thesis, Jerusalem: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Intext citation: (Borg 1978: 112); Borg (1978: 112)
Footnote citation: Borg 1978: 112; Borg (1978: 112)

- Internet sources

Abdellatif, Karim. 2010. Dictionnaire « le Karmous » du Tunisien : Qāmus al-Karmūs li-l-luġa at-tūnisiyya. 19 February 2012. https://www.fichier-pdf.fr/2010/08/31/m14401m/.
Watson, Janet C. E. 2003. ‘Some Pausal Forms from Text 6 of Waṣf Sanʿā: Texts in Ṣanʿānī Arabic Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2000 (Semitica Viva; 23)’. 31 October 2003. http://www.semarch.uni-hd.de/tondokumente.php43?&GR_ID=&ORT_ID=54&DOK_ID=1003〈=de.

- Citations

Behnstedt (1994a, 1994b)
Behnstedt (1994a: 102, 1994b: 134)
Behnstedt (1994a: 102, 134, 148–49)
(Behnstedt 1994a: 102, 134, 148–49; Woidich 1996: 72, 1998: 34)
Serracino-Inglott (1975–2003: vol. 1)
Serracino-Inglott (1975: 1, 123–124)


Transcription/transliteration

Authors may use a recognised scientific transcription/transliteration system that suits their purposes. They must explain any non-standard or unusual elements in the text or footnote.

Transcription/transliteration must be used for all languages written in non-Latin script. In addition to the writing of any words in non-Latin alphabets, a transcription must mandatorily appear. Longer paragraphs may only be given in alphabets other than Latin when scientifically and methodologically justified.


Illustrations

Any illustrations used in articles must either be copyrighted by their respective authors or permission must be given to the editorial office for their use.

Publication Ethics Policy


Publication Ethics Policy and Malpractice Statement

The Editors of Folia Orientalia will do their best to counteract bad practices in scholarly writing, making all possible efforts to disclose cases of academic dishonesty concerning fraud authorship, plagiarism, disclosure and conflict of interest, as well as ghostwriting and guest authorship.

The articles where research misconduct has occurred will also be disclosed. Such cases, if documented, will be passed on to the authors’ authorities as well as scientific societies and publishers. Authors are therefore asked to provide necessary details of contributions made to their articles, as well as inform the editors of sources of the publication’s financing (if applicable).

Any work or words of other authors, contributors or sources should be appropriately credited and referenced. All articles not in accordance with these standards will be removed from the publication if malpractice is discovered at any time even after the publication.

Authors submitting the manuscripts to the journal for publication as original articles confirm that their works represent authors’ contributions and have not been copied or plagiarised in whole or in part from other publications without clear citing.

If an author discovers a significant error or inaccuracy in their own published work, it is their obligation to promptly notify the journal editor and cooperate with the editor to retract or correct the article. The editorial board is always willing to publish corrections, clarifications, retractions and apologies when needed.

The editorial board ensures a fair double-blind peer-review of the submitted manuscripts. It also ensures all the information related to the submitted manuscripts to be kept as confidential prior to publishing. The reviewers evaluate manuscripts based on their intellectual content regardless of ethnic origin, gender, sexual
orientation, citizenship, religious beliefs or political philosophy of the authors. They must ensure that all the information related to submitted manuscripts is kept confidential and must report to one of the editors if they are aware of copyright infringement and plagiarism on the author’s side. They must evaluate the submitted works objectively as well as present their opinions in a clear way in the review form. The editorial board has implemented an anti-plagiarism policy. If a reviewer suspects plagiarism, the article will be verified using a plagiarism detection programme.


The journal’s editorial board follows the guidelines of COPE: Committee of Publication Ethics. All persons involved in the publication process must be familiar with the ethical standards of Folia Orientalia.

Peer-review Procedure

Review Process and Reviewers

Peer Review Process

Articles sent to the editorial team of Folia Orientalia journal are first subjected to internal review by the editors-in-chief and the academic secretary. After the primary qualification, the texts are sent to external reviewers (double-blind review). Each article is reviewed by two reviewers specialising in each subject. Texts are sent for review anonymously: the identity of the reviewed author will not be disclosed to reviewers, nor vice versa. The review must contain an explicit conclusion stating whether the article should or should not be accepted for publication.

Papers that have received an approval of both reviewers are qualified for publication. As a result of the review process, authors may be expected to modify their articles according to the recommendations of the reviewers. The editorial board retains a right to publish, to reject or to return an article for modifications. In the event of an ambivalent publishing review, the text is submitted for another evaluation. Articles on which two negative opinions have been passed will not be accepted for publication. The authors of negatively assessed texts will be notified as soon as the reviews reach the editors.

Review form [download .docx, .pdf]

Reviewers The list of reviewers for the given issue is available on the journal’s website.

Reviewers

List of Reviewers

Folia Orientalia 57 (2020) – 58 (2021)

Werner Arnold (Heidelberg University and Center for Jewish Studies Heidelberg)
Piotr Bachtin (University of Warsaw)
Sergio Baldi (University of Naples “L’Orientale”)
Giorgio Banti (University of Naples “L’Orientale”)
Basilius Bawardi (Bar-Ilan University)
Clive Holes (Oxford University)
Peter Juhás (Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
Małgorzata Kajzer (Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology of the Polish Academy of Sciences)
Edyta Kopp (University of Warsaw)
Jolanta Młynarczyk (University of Warsaw)
Michał Moch (Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures of the Polish Academy of Science)
Antonia Navarro-Tejero (University of Córdoba)
Nina Pawlak (University of Warsaw)
Joachim Quack (Heidelberg University)
Magdalena Rodziewicz (University of Warsaw)
Josef Tropper (Free University Berlin, Humboldt University)
Mateusz Wilk (University of Warsaw)
David Wilmsen (American University of Sharjah)

This page uses 'cookies'. Learn more