Humanities and Social Sciences

LINGUISTICA SILESIANA

Content

LINGUISTICA SILESIANA | 2021 | vol. 42 |

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Abstract

In Old English dual personal pronouns constituted a small but significant pocket of its inflectional morphology. Their disappearance in Middle English is usually taken as evidence for their marginal and tenuous status already in the preceding centuries. They are seen as optional, poetic, and unpredictable. It is the argument of this paper on the basis of the evidence of the Old English Genesis that these claims warrant a careful revision as – at least in this one poem – there is nothing random or irregular about their use.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marcin Krygier
1

  1. Adam Mickiewicz University Poznań
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Abstract

Although interlinear glosses theoretically involve providing the most exact native equivalent for each foreign item in the text (cf., e.g. Nida 2004: 161), they often prove to be much more than a mechanical process of creating lexical correspondences. One of the best examples of glossing which is a “conscious, occasionally very careful “interpretative translation”” (Nagucka 1997: 180), is the collection of 10th century glosses added by Aldred to the Latin text of the Lindisfarne Gospels. This oldest existing translation of the Gospels into English consists not only of a word‑for‑word renderings, since Aldred also used multiple glosses, marginal notes, and occasionally left the words unglossed. Thus, particular Latin words are often translated in several different ways.
The present study focuses on words denoting objects and phenomena which were presumably unfamiliar or obscure to the Anglo‑Saxon audience. Those include items specific to the society, culture, as well as fauna and flora. The study shows various methods employed by the glossator to familiarise the concepts to the readers.
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Authors and Affiliations

Anna Wojtyś
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Abstract

It is the objective of this paper to analyse selected English Renaissance translations of the Book of Psalms in the light of their reception. In particular, I intend to illustrate how a strong preference for a familiar rendition over a new one (regardless of its quality and status) showed itself in the textual composition of the most important book of the Anglican Church – the Book of Common Prayer. Discussion of the Psalm translation selected for the five successive versions of the Book of Common Prayer against the backdrop of the emergence of new renditions of the Psalms leads on to formulating a desideratum for sound methodology which would express the level of similarities between texts in mathematical terms and in this way objectivise assessments of Psalter renditions. The paper offers a preliminary attempt at such methodology by applying the cosine distance method. The obtained results need to be verified on a larger corpus of data, but they are promising enough to consider this method an important step towards assessing Psalm translations.
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Authors and Affiliations

Magdalena Charzyńska-Wójcik
1

  1. The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin
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Abstract

The aim of this article is to examine early English references to those involved in storing, selling and making medicinal preparations. Also, we will attempt to find out how early pharmacists were perceived by other medical practitioners. The study is mainly based on the language material from two medical corpora Middle English Medical Texts (MEMT) and Early Modern English Medical Texts (EMEMT). In order to make the list of references to early pharmacists as comprehensive as possible, the online editions of the following dictionaries have been consulted: Historical Thesaurus of English (HTE), Middle English Dictionary (MED), and Oxford English Dictionary (OED).
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Authors and Affiliations

Marta Sylwanowicz
1

  1. University of Warsaw
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Abstract

The aim of this paper is to discuss the origin of the Polish word farmacja and establish its deep‑rooted etymology. The author provides an outline of the history of the word in Polish and presents its direct source, i.e. the Latin word pharmacia, describes the word family in Latin and indicates that the Greek etymon φαρμακεία provided the basis of the Latin form. The analysis of the word family, to which the Greek word belongs, showed a close relationship with semantic fields such as making poison and practising magic. The key expression turned out to be the Greek form φάρμακον, the origin of which remains unclear. Many hypotheses have been proposed, none of which, unfortunately, is satisfactory.
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Authors and Affiliations

Jadwiga Waniakowa
1

  1. Jagiellonian University
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Abstract

The history of English spelling is an eventful one, from Old English with an almost one‑to‑one sound‑to‑spelling relationship, to Modern English, notorious for its sound‑to‑spelling unpredictability. In between lies a vast period characterised by immense spelling variability, reflecting the cumulative effect of dialectal variation and lack of uniformity, additionally compounded by the mode of text transmission in the manuscript culture, whose characteristics were adopted in a wholesale fashion into the culture of early print. In effect, early printed books present a rich kaleidoscope of spelling variants, which – not infrequently – co‑occur on the same page or even in the same line of a printed text. This paper addresses the issue of this variability with a view to measuring in mathematical terms the degree of internal spelling variation within a text and showing that much of the spelling variation is associated with compositors as agents in the printing process. The analysis of internal spelling variation is based on George Joye’s 1534 English translation of the Psalms printed in Antwerp and aims at identifying parts of the text which are similar or different in terms of spellings by applying cosine similarity measurements performed on individual quires of the publication.
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Authors and Affiliations

Jerzy Wójcik
1

  1. The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin
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Abstract

The impact of the Polish language on the English lexical fabric, although unimpressive, is worth noticing. However, thus far it has not been a source of interest of many scholars. The present paper aims at discussing Polish loanwords that have found their way into the English language; this is done by means of collecting alleged loanwords from an array of sources (dictionaries, subject literature, and the Internet) which are later verified against, inter alia, such etymological dictionaries as the Oxford English Dictionary. Next, in order to assess their scale of use, selected items are checked in a number of corpora available online. The research concludes that there are 33 direct borrowings from the Polish language (belonging to 8 semantic categories) present in English, and nearly half of them are yet unattested in the OED.
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Authors and Affiliations

Radosław Dylewski
1
Zuzanna Witt
1

  1. Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań
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Abstract

English in India evokes connotations of worldliness, education, class, and power. Although many less socially fortunate groups lack in the English language competence, its presence in the Indian street is increasing, and not only in the context of tourism and marketing. The investigation of the linguistic landscapes of a number of localities in northern India will focus on public service advertisements written in English which convey guidelines for the creation of a healthier Indian society. The study, informed by the rhetoric of social intervention approach, investigates the choice and the frequency of the persuasive rhetorical devices used in the texts. It also discusses which of the three modes of persuasion typically underlie the analysed advertisements, thereby highlighting the preferred approach to tackling local issues and, indirectly, contributing to strengthening the role of English through the positive perception of the messages conveyed.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marta Dąbrowska
1

  1. Jagiellonian University
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Abstract

The year 1643 saw the publication of Listy swięteo oyca Partheniusza do Piotra Mohily, which came out of the printing press of the Polish‑language department of the Kyiv Lavra. In the Letters Parthenius – a relatively unknown patriarch of Con-stantinople – discusses Confessio Fidei – a succinct confession of faith published in Geneva in 1629 under the name of Cyril Lucaris – an Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople and opponent of the union. As Confessio is clearly Calvinist is spirit, Parthenius refutes Lucaris’ authorship and imposes an anathema on the genuine author of Confessio and its propagators. The recipient and a probable translator of Letters is Peter Mohyla – a distinguished Metropolitan of Kyiv, author of the first Orthodox catechism and founder of the Mohyla Collegium. The paper addresses the issue of the Letters, in particular their Polish translation and the identity of the translator but does so against the broader background of the circumstances occasioned by the emergence of the contentious Confessio and the Orthodox Church’s ultimate reaction to its emergence.
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Authors and Affiliations

Jolanta Klimek-Grądzka
1

  1. The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin
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Abstract

In the present paper, we extend previous work on the speech act of threatening by including in our analysis a corpus of crime fiction based on 700 English books, a characteristic trait of which are threats. By including data derived from written narratives in prose, imaginary rather than factual, this research aims to identify potential differences between fictional and authentic threats, thus contributing to the general panorama of this speech act. Here we concentrate on a single construction, known as disjunctive conditional or pseudo‑imperative, which is analysed in terms of parameters employed in previous studies and modified to meet the purposes on the present research.
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Authors and Affiliations

Andrzej Łyda
1
Monika Zasowska
1

  1. University of Silesia in Katowice
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Abstract

The following paper aims to analyse the functions of the interjection oh in the English corpus provided by Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones’s Diary and its translation into Polish. Once the functions and patterns of the form are defined, the translation strategies employed are analysed. The study reveals which translational strategies proposed by Cuenca (2006) are employed in the translation of oh: literal translation, using an interjection with dissimilar form but having the same meaning, using a non‑interjective structure but with similar meaning, using an interjection with a different meaning, omission, or addition of usually a primary interjection. The analysis of the interjection oh is preceded by a very brief presentation of various approaches focusing on the problem of defining and classifying interjections, as well as the presentation of the research concerning the interjection oh and its description in the specialist literature.
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Authors and Affiliations

Anna Drzazga
1

  1. University of Silesia in Katowice
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Abstract

The International Classification of Function, Health and Disability (ICF) underscores a functional approach to aphasia assessment and therapy. The widespread uptake of the ICF necessitates a reflection whether the existing knowledge base on the Polish language of aphasia will permit speech‑language pathologists in Poland to make a strong contribution to this international trend. Using the PRISMA‑ScR methodology, a scoping review was conducted to describe and summarise the current state of research on the impact of aphasia on the subsystems of the Polish language and its mental processing. The findings indicate that although empirical studies of the Polish language of aphasia have so far addressed all the language subsystems, the level of scientific evidence in this area is low and the resulting knowledge base is incomplete and fragmented. There are significant research gaps, particularly in regard to pragmatics and discourse in aphasia, which need to be filled, so that the new empirical evidence can be used to develop functionally oriented and consequence‑based clinical tools and methods.
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Authors and Affiliations

Robert Dębski
1
Paulina Wójcik-Topór
1
Magdalena Knapek
1

  1. Jagiellonian University
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Abstract

Critical Genre Analysis (CGA) is a theory of interdiscursive performance taking a multi-perspective approach to account for professional practice, demystify the interdiscursive nature of professional genres, account for professional identities, understand professional communication as interdiscursive performance, and provide evidence-based pedagogical insights. The present paper capitalizes upon CGA to analyze the genre of Principal’s Remarks, which originate from a speech delivered by the school principal on the anniversary and annual speech day of a school to report the development of the school. A total of 12 Principal’s Remarks of an aided Christian secondary school in Hong Kong, China released in 12 consecutive years were incorporated into the corpus for analysis. The genre was analyzed at four levels, which conceptualize discourse as text, genre, professional practice, and social practice respectively. The study exemplifies how CGA can be capitalized upon to analyze an unfamiliar genre in a multi‑perspective fashion.
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Authors and Affiliations

Chi Wui Ng
1

  1. The Chinese University of Hong Kong
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Abstract

The article is devoted to the study of the national worldview’s peculiarities on the material of names of airspace, celestial bodies and natural elements. The quantitative analysis of common and different meanings of the analyzed lexical units in Ukrainian, German, English and French relating to the person’s characteristics in society is carried out. The greatest number of connotative meanings that characterize the behavior, features of character, appearance and a certain state of a person, show the lexemes water and fire. The lower item takes the use of the lexeme moon, and the lexemes sky and sun are in the last positions. Among the common and different meanings the common meanings prevail quantitatively. In the different meanings with national peculiarity the most belong to French. The use of each of the analyzed names in figurative meanings reveals the meanings with a positive and negative connotation, the meanings with negative connotation prevail. The obtained results are indicative of the importance of the analyzed names for different peoples.
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Authors and Affiliations

Larysa Drobakha
1

  1. Vinnytsia Mykhailo Kotsiubynskyi State Pedagogical University

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Reviewers

The Linguistica Silesiana peer-referees 2017-2020

  • Beata Abdallah-Krzepkowska
  • Magdalena Bartłomiejczyk
  • Magdalena Bator
  • Monika Bielińska
  • Bogusław Bierwiaczonek
  • Krzysztof Bogacki
  • Jan Čermák
  • Bożena Cetnarowska
  • Magdalena Charzyńska-Wójcik
  • Grzegorz Drożdż
  • Radosław Dylewski
  • Henryk Fontański
  • Danuta Gabryś-Barker
  • Piotr Gąsiorowski
  • Łukasz Grabowski
  • Ireneusz Kida
  • Robert Kiełtyka
  • Marcin Krygier
  • Marcin Kuczok
  • Katarzyna Kwapisz-Osadnik
  • Czesław Lachur
  • Andrzej Łyda
  • Ewa Miczka
  • Ewa Myrczek-Kadłubicka
  • John G. Newman
  • Mikołaj Nkollo
  • Jerzy Nykiel
  • Ewa Piechurska-Kuciel
  • Tadeusz Piotrowski
  • Adam Pluszczyk
  • Andrzej Porzuczek
  • Hans Sauer
  • Czesława Schatte
  • Piotr Stalmaszczyk
  • Monika Sułkowska
  • Konrad Szcześniak
  • Krystyna Warchał
  • Halina Widła
  • Krzysztof Witczak
  • Adam Wojtaszek
  • Marcin Zabawa

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