Humanities and Social Sciences

Slavia Orientalis

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Slavia Orientalis | 2021 | vol. LXX | No 1 |

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Abstract

The article puts forward the thesis that the impressive achievement of Old Russian literature in the form of the literary heritage of St. Nil Sorsky is testimony to the creative continuation of Byzantine religious literature and the assimilation of the hagiographic stylistic patterns developed by the Veliko Tyrnovo School and its successors within the Eastern Slavic areas in the 14th and 15th centuries. The research is based on the texts: Admonitions for Spiritual Children and The Rule of Skit. Both are considered the most representative works of the spiritual leader of the Elders beyond the Volga. The analyses demonstrated the genre‑stylistic specificity of the above mentioned texts, expressing a Byzantine‑Slavic mystical discourse, one today known as Hesychasm. The text The Rule of Skit appeared to be unique in the history of East Slavonic utterances, presenting a comprehensive and integrated spiritual process leading to Hesychia. We are dealing with a treatise whose counterpart in Byzantine literature is The Ladder of Paradise by St. John of Sinai – this is a genre of Hesychastic literature, i.e. a kind of strategy for use in spiritual warfare leading from the state of sinfulness to deification, or holiness. In addition, attention has been drawn to the great care within the Hesychastes for the quality of texts expressing a mystical and ascetic current or serving liturgical purposes. New translations of Greek literature, which took into account the
achievements of the fourteenth‑century Hesychastic Councils and testify to the development of a philological and translation technique among the Orthodox Slavs, one that enabled the emergence of Slavic patristic syntheses, and to which St. Nil Sorsky’s works are recognized as the highest achievement.
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Authors and Affiliations

Józef Kuffel
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Uniwersytet Jagielloński w Krakowie
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Abstract

The article analyzes reflections on the child in the most notable works of the 18th‑century Ukrainian historical narrative: the chronicles of Samovidets, Hryhoriy Hrabianka, Samiilo Velychko, and Istoria Rusiv. These works, being the only historical thought reflections of the Hetman State, had no equal. Later they were to become the basis for constructing the modern vision of the Cossack past on the part of 19th‑century Ukrainian historians, writers, and public figures. The focus is on those plots and contexts where the authors addressed children’s topics. The 18th‑century vision of childhood is investigated on that basis, along with the impact these stories had on later recipients and the formation of modern ideas about childhood in “old Ukraine”. Attempted is also a study of children’s topics as a tool for describing and constructing the past in Baroque rhetoric and historical narratives.
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Authors and Affiliations

Ігор Сердюк
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Полтавський національний педагогічний університет імені В.Г. Короленка
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Abstract

The article is an attempt to interpret selected works by Fyodor Sologub ( Церковь, В моей лампаде ясный свет..., Опять сияние в лампаде..., Моя верховная Воля), characterized by the lyrical I’s gradual departure, a turning away from God towards the forces of evil, deism and demonic solipsism. These works display the complex motifs typical of modernist aestheticism; inspired by the philosophical thought of A. Schopenhauer: his pessimism, disillusionment with the world, despair, existential emptiness, complete loneliness etc. The lyrical subject finds himself in a certain spiritual wilderness. His relationship with God undergoes a drastic change. The hitherto Christian figure of the merciful Father is replaced by the strict and cruel judge, the evil demiurge. The poet gives him the name of the Old Testament God – Adonai. However, by his actions (evil, insidious and vengeful), he rather resembles the Gnostic Jaldabaoth or Satan – the opponent of Christians. The interpreted texts also reveal the authorial lyrical speaker as fascinated with “the new genius” – Lucifer, whose image becomes positively redefined. He gains the status, as well as the features and powers traditionally ascribed to the Christian God.
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Authors and Affiliations

Ewa Stawinoga
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Lublin, Uniwersytet Marii Curie‑Skłodowskiej
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Abstract

Thinking of the earth as feminine derives from the oldest ideas as to the four rudimentary elements. Bipolarity, which is present in the take on the earth as an archetypical element, one giving life and finally absorbing it back, has not lost its relevance to this day. It is therefore myths, followed by philosophical considerations valuing the distinction between divine and human qualities, which have always been in conflict and cooperation, and these have marked the path Nikolai Berdyaev, the Russian religious thinker, takes. The problem of the nature of man’s gender is the fundamental issue of his philosophical anthropology. The stance represented by the author of The Meaning of the Creative Act is based on the conviction that the structure of the world constitutes two opposing elements, two opposing forces: good and evil, with good being linked to the male and evil to the female. The male to him is anthropological and personal, the female – cosmic and collective. One of Berdyaev’s most important beliefs is that the earth should be treated in a mystical sense as a principle female in matter and body. The driving force behind the world is the clash of both principles, the contact and interaction between the solar male and the terrestrial female. Through the prism of the cosmic battle of the genders, Berdyaev explains Freud’s concept of the Oedipus complex, giving it a mystical- ‑symbolic dimension.
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Authors and Affiliations

Izabella Malej
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Wrocław, Uniwersytet Wrocławski
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Abstract

This paper is dedicated to a study of the religious layer in I. Ilf and E. Petrov’s novel The Twelve Chairs. The analysis provided leads to a deeper understanding of the novel as a travesty. First of all, the few existing works devoted to the problem of biblical referencing in The Twelve Chairs are listed and summarised. Secondly, these existing works will be supplemented with previously unmentioned and unstudied allusions. Following on from the religious aspects considered are: the novel’s title, the parallel between Jesus and Ostap Bender, the character of Fedor Vostrikov, the story of the ‘hussar‑monk’ and several biblical allusions contained in The Twelve Chairs. Finally, in the last part of our research, all the religious motifs are classified in order to further an understanding of the authors’ attitude towards the Bible. In conclusion, we determine the nature of the perception of the Bible in The Twelve Chairs.
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Authors and Affiliations

Маргарита Шанурина
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Московский Государственный университет им. М. Ломоносова
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Abstract

The article is devoted to the subject of ethical problems in Aleksandr Vampilov’s drama Duck Hunting. A detailed analysis of the character concepts and the complexity of the composition enable one to reach the motives and images the work’s contents are actualized through: rain, a window, a door, a telephone – these are the recurring motives crucial in presenting the moral dilemmas of the main character – Viktor Zilov. Each of them may be interpreted as a sign of spiritual anxiety and Zilov’s efforts, his ups and downs, questioning the value of life and giving it some meaning. An oscillation between extremes, transitioning from drama to comedy and from laughter to tears, determines the structure of the text and, at the same time, gives an expression of the main character’s existential quest, one lost in the intricacies of every‑day reality. A The drama’s perfect structuring, the careful construction of space – the real and the imaginary, sound and light effects are all subordinated to the one imperative goal – showing Zilov’s spiritual evolution and the moral feeling still present in his life.
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Authors and Affiliations

Beata Siwek
1

  1. Lublin, Katolicki Uniwersytet Lubelski Jana Pawła II
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Abstract

The paper is concerned with one of the internal forces driving the progress of lyrical discourse. Its nature consists in that initially, some linguistic and/or cognitive deviation appears in the poem, and next the author undertakes a series of attempts at its adjustment or mitigation. More often than not these attempts are increasingly successful, but at some later point they, for various reasons, stop to be rewarding. This tends to happen either at the end of the text, where the most important truth is prototypically discovered, or immediately before the final fragment. In both cases, the completion of the relevant ‘adjustment’ theme plays a significant compositional role. Discussed at some length are the implications of our analysis for the theory of discourse relations. The bulk of the instances under examination are drawn from O. Mandelstam’s verse.
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Authors and Affiliations

Gennadij Zeldowicz
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Warszawa, Uniwersytet Warszawski
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Abstract

The article studies the problems of forming intentional deformations of a narrative category of event in the prose of a famous Russian absurdist of the 1920s‑30s, a member of the avant‑garde collective Oberiu – Daniil Kharms. The study defines the main regularities of generating “normal” textual events as well as the mechanisms for their deformations and destructions within a narrative “story” and its “discourse”. The most important reasons for the “ludic” absurdity of events within D. Kharms’ short stories are the unintelligibility of the described objects, the ontological absurdity of the objects of events, the absurdity of the heroes’ behaviour and thinking, the sequence (multiplication) of events, the violation of structural order and the integrity of the described objects and their constituents, among others. The absurdization of events in the narrative “discourse” is presupposed by a set of semantic and pragmatic devices, in particular: the author’s assumed inability to create an event’s manoeuvring or to build the plot; the violation of the logic of the development of the plotline; making the modus and modality elements of the story weird; shifting points of view and their focuses, to name a few. The author’s intentional deviations within the “story” and the “discourse” of the belles‑lettres narrative cause communicative senses characteristic for an absurd type of writing: the senses of mental “charming”, which border on the reader’s cognitive “stupor”, as well as numerous senses of an evaluative and ludic character generated by the common “background” of the reader’s consciousness and borrowed, so to say, from “standard” belles‑lettres text types and narratives. The article outlines the perspectives of lingual‑narrative studies into weird (absurd, in particular) belles‑lettres texts.
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Authors and Affiliations

Флорій Бацевич
1

  1. Львівський університет імені Івана Франка
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Abstract

The article is devoted to the problem of defining the concept “ideologeme,” one meaningful for political linguistics. The paper attempts to define the concept of an ideologeme and also present a classification of ideologemes. In this paper the following types of ideologemes are discussed: ideologemes proper and ideologemic words. The types of ideologemes are accompanied with examples from “Trybuna Radziecka” – the main Polish newspaper published in Moscow from 1927 to 1938 and edited by Polish communists, living as political émigrés in post‑revolution Soviet Russia.
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Authors and Affiliations

Tamara Graczykowska
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Bydgoszcz, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego
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Abstract

The article highlights the actualization specificity of the notion of epistle in lexicographical and academic sources. The study reveals the semantic structure peculiar features of this notion. The focus of attention consists of two main issues: the history of the origin of the genre in the Ukrainian tradition and the functional‑style differentiation of the epistle as a literary genre. The literary studies approach to determining the genre status of an epistle is limited to its interpretation as a genre of artistic and journalistic styles. An analysis of the texts under study reveals the epistle’s dominant typological features and the peculiarities of their explication within official and artistic styles. There is convincing evidence that religious epistles have one of the most ancient manifestations in the functional‑stylistic system of the Ukrainian language and that they arose both within the specific Ukrainian linguistic context and in the form of the translated texts of the Holy Scripture. The findings of the study give reasons to determine the epistle as a historically established speech genre, which has a functional‑style specificity and stereotypical compositional content organization. The typology of the epistle genre features is most clearly represented at the level of the textual and structural‑stylistic organization.
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Authors and Affiliations

Світлана Богдан
1
ORCID: ORCID
Тетяна Тарасюк
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Луцьк, Волинський національний університет імені Лесі Українки
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Abstract

The “top‑bottom” opposition is a binary spatial opposition. It describes the orientation of objects in space as well as identifies the spatial qualification of an object and models the coordinate system of the linguistic (resp. dialectal) worldview. This article deals with the problem of the semantic structure of derivatives, i.e. fragments of the derivative clusters of the base words of this opposition: верх, гора (“top”) and низ, гора, (с)під (“bottom”). The author scrutinizes the semantics of the adjectives вéрхній (верховúй, верхóвний), горíшній (гóрний) / ни́ жній (низови́ й), дóлíшній (дóльний), спíдній (сподо- вúй). These semantic features are analyzed within three semantic subcomplexes: ‘the top / bottom of the object’; ‘high / low limit’; ‘surface (exterior / interior)’. The subcomplexes unite the meanings of the adjectives which are structured hierarchically. These meanings represent different aspects of Ukrainian life. This study applied the traditional onomasiological descriptive model, moving the focus from the meaning to the word. The analysed units represent semantic and derivational features which are typical for the dialects of the Ukrainian language. The sources of the study are historical and regional dictionaries and texts, as well as linguistic atlases. As the study is based on an analysis of historical sources and manuscripts of the Ukrainian language from the 11th century onwards, semantic changes were recorded at different historical stages.
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Authors and Affiliations

Тетяна Ястремська
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Львів, Інститут українознавства ім. І. Крип’якевича НАН України
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Abstract

The relevance of the study is explained by the growing popularity of a political Internet, thanks to which all politicians, regardless of age and status, are able to address an audience directly without resorting to intermediaries such as the media. Taking into account the main goal of political communication – the manipulation of public consciousness, it seems especially relevant to find out what persuasive strategies politicians use to manipulate public opinion and convince their audiences of the correctness of their judgments as made opportune by the political Internet. Thus, in the present study, an attempt has been made to answer the question as to whether there are differences in the strategies and tactics of persuasion used in the personal blogs of two generations of politicians. Using the methods of computer linguistics, analyzed were ten personal blogs of politicians of different age. The study found that both young and more experienced politicians with varying degrees of intensity resort to employing all the analyzed strategies and persuasion tactics. The most popular tactics found in the blogs of the younger generation of politicians were call‑for‑action tactics, and in the blogs of their older colleagues – the tactics of incrimination.
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Authors and Affiliations

Юлия Балакина
1
ORCID: ORCID
Анастасия Федоровцева
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Москва, Национальный исследовательский университет «Высшая школа экономики»

Authors and Affiliations

Елена Николаева
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Российский государственный гидрометеорологический университет, Санкт‑Петербург

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Ibidem, s.13.
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Reviewers

Recenzenci (2015-2019)

Bartwicka, Halina, dr hab., prof. UKW, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego

Bacewicz, Florij, prof., Uniwersytet Lwowski

Bednarczyk, Anna, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Łódzki

Betko, Iryna, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Warmińsko-Mazurski

Bezwiński, Adam, prof. zw. dr hab., Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego

Cymborska-Leboda, Maria, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej

Chlebda, Wojciech, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Opolski

Charciarek, Andrzej, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Śląski

Czyżewski, Feliks, prof. zw., dr hab. UMCS w Lublinie

Diec, Joachim, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Jagielloński

Dudek, Andrzej, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Jagielloński

Fałowski, Adam, prof. zw., dr hab. Uniwersytet Jagielloński

Fast, Piotr, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Śląski

Głuszkowski, Michał, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika

Gołębiowska-Suchorska, Agnieszka, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego

Grzybowski, Stefan, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika

Kiklewicz, Aleksander, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warmińsko-Mazurski

Kowalska-Stus, Hanna, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Jagielloński

Korytkowska, Małgorzata, prof. zw., dr hab., Instytut Slawistyki PAN

Kościołek, Anna, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika

Kowalczyk, Witold, dr hab., prof. UMCS, Uniwersytet Marii Curie -Skłodowskiej

Ksenicz, Andrzej, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Zielonogórski

Laszczak, Wanda, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Opolski

Łucewicz, Ludmiła, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warszawski

Malej, Izabella, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Wrocławski

Małek, Eliza, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Łódzki

Marszałek, Marek, dr hab. prof. uczelni Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego

Mędelska, Jolanta, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego

Mikiciuk, Elżbieta, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Gdański

Mozer, Michael, prof., Instytut Slawistyki, Uniwersytet w Wiedniu

Nikołajew, Siergiej, prof., Instytut Literatury Rosyjskiej (Dom Puszkinowski)

Orłowski, Jan, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej

Pluskota, Teresa, dr hab., prof. UKW, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego

Przebinda, Grzegorz, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Jagielloński

Ranczin, Andriej, prof., Moskiewski Uniwersytet im. M. Łomonosowa

Raźny, Anna, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Jagielloński

Rieger, Janusz, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warszawski

Stawarz, Barbara, dr hab., prof. UP, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny w Krakowie

Suchanek, Lucjan, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Jagielloński

Trojanowska, Beata, dr hab. Prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego

Waligórska-Olejniczak, Beata, dr hab., prof. uczelni, Uniwersytet Adama Mickiewicza

Wawrzyńczyk, Jan, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warszawski

Wołodźko-Butkiewicz, Alicja, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warszawski

Woźniak, Anna, prof. zw., dr hab., Katolicki Uniwersytet Lubelski


Recenzenci (2012-2014)
Bartwicka, Halina, dr hab., prof. UKW, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego
Bednarczyk, Anna, dr hab., prof. UŁ, Uniwersytet Łódzki
Cymborska-Leboda, Maria, prof. zw., dr hab. Uniwersyey Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej
Chlebda, Wojciech, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Opolski
Czyżewski, Feliks, prof. dr hab. UMCS w Lublinie
Diec, Joachim, dr hab., prof. UJ, Uniwersytet Jagielloński
Duda, Katarzyna, dr hab., prof. UJ, Uniwersytet Jagielloński
Dudek, Andrzej, dr hab., Uniwersytet Jagielloński
Fałowski, Adam, prof.dr hab. Uniwersyetet Jagielloński
Fast, Piotr, prof. zw., dr hab., Wyższa Szkoła Lingwistyczna w Częstochowie
Kiklewicz, Aleksander, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warmińsko-Mazurski
Korytkowska, Małgorzata, prof. zw., dr hab., Instytut Slawistyki PAN
Kościołek, Anna, dr hab., prof. UMK, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika
Kowalczyk, Witold, dr hab., prof. UMCS, Uniwersytet Marii Curie -Skłodowskiej
Kozak, Stefan, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warszawski
Laszczak, Wanda, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Opolski
Łucewicz, Ludmiła, prof.zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warszawski
Majmieskułow, Anna, dr hab., prof. UKW, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego
Malej, Izabella, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Wrocławski
Małek, Eliza, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Łódzki
Mędelska, Jolanta, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego
Mianowska, Joanna, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego
Mikiciuk, Elżbieta, dr hab., prof. UG, Uniwersytet Gdański
Mozer, Michael, prof., Instytut Slawistyki, Uniwersytet w Wiedniu
Orłowski, Jan, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej
Pluskota, Teresa, dr hab., prof. UKW, Uniwersytet Kazimierza Wielkiego
Ranczin, Andriej, prof., Moskiewski Uniwersytet im. M. Łomonosowa
Raźny, Anna, prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Jagielloński
Rieger, Janusz, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warszawski
Stawarz, Barbara, dr hab., prof. UP, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny w Krakowie
Suchanek, Lucjan, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Jagielloński
Wawrzyńczyk, Jan, em. prof. zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warszawski
Wołodźko-Butkiewicz, Alicja, prof.zw., dr hab., Uniwersytet Warszawski

 

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