Applied sciences

Bulletin of the Polish Academy of Sciences: Technical Sciences

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Bulletin of the Polish Academy of Sciences: Technical Sciences | 2021 | 69 | 5

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Authors and Affiliations

Bogusław Major
1
Andrei Victor Sandu
2
ORCID: ORCID
Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri Abdullah
3
Marcin Nabiałek
4
ORCID: ORCID
Tomasz Tański
5
Adam Zieliński
6

  1. Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science Polish Academy of Science, ul. Reymonta 25, 30-059 Kraków, Poland
  2. Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Gheorghe Asachi Technical University of Iasi, 71 D. Mangeron Blvd., 700050 Iasi, Romania
  3. Faculty of Chemical Engineering Technology, Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), 01000 Perlis, Malaysia
  4. Institute of Physics, Czestochowa University of Technology, ul. Dabrowskiego 69, 42-201 Czestochowa, Poland
  5. Department of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Konarskiego 18A, 44-100, Gliwice, Poland
  6. Sieć Badawcza Łukasiewicz – Instytut Metalurgii Żelaza im. Stanisława Staszica, (Łukasiewicz Research Network – Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy), ul. K. Miarki 12-14, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
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Abstract

Tensile tests of 8009Al alloy reinforced with SiC and Al₂O₃ particles fabricated by powder metallurgy (PM) were conducted at temperatures of 250–350°C and strain rates of 0.001–0.1 s⁻¹. The ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the samples decreased while the temperature and strain rate increased. The elongation slightly decreased at first and then increased with growing temperature because of the medium-temperature brittleness of the alloy matrix. When the strain rate was 0.1 s⁻¹, the elongation of the 8009Al/Al₂O₃ composites always decreased with an increase in temperature because of the poorly coordinated deformation and weak bonding between the matrix and Al₂O₃ particles at such a high strain rate. The work-hardening rates of the composites sharply increased to maxima and then decreased rapidly as the strain increased. Meanwhile, the 8009Al/SiCₚ composites displayed superior UTS, YS, elongation, and work-hardening rates than those of the 8009Al/Al₂O₃ composites under the same conditions. Compared to 8009Al alloys reinforced with spherical Al₂O₃ particle, 8009Al alloys reinforced with irregular SiC particles exhibited a better strengthening effect. The fracture mechanism of the 8009Al/SiCₚ composites was mainly ductile, while that of the 8009Al/Al₂O₃ composites was primarily debonding at the matrix–particle interfaces in a brittle mode.
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Authors and Affiliations

Shuang Chen
1
Guoqiang Chen
1
Pingping Gao
1 2
Chunxuan Liu
2
Anru Wu
1
Lijun Dong
1
Zhonghua Huang
1
Chun Ouyang
1 3 4
Hui Zhang
5

  1. Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Vehicle Power and Transmission System, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104, China
  2. Hunan Gold Sky Aluminum Industry High-tech Co., Ltd., Changsha 410205, China
  3. School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang Jiangsu 21200, China
  4. CETC Maritime Electronics Research Institute Co., Ltd., Ningbo Zhejiang 315000, China
  5. College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China
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Abstract

The main aim of the study was to search for the relationship between the anisotropy of the structure of polyfurfuryl alcohol (PFA) – polymer/compressed expanded graphite (CEG)-matrix composites at subsequent stages of the technological process and characteristics of the acoustic emission (AE) descriptors. These composites, obtained after successive technological procedures of impregnation, polymerization, and carbonization, possess different structure, densities, porosity, and other physicochemical properties. In the structures of composites prepared on the basis of CEG, two basic directions can be distinguished: parallel to the bedding plane of graphite sheets and perpendicular to it. The measurements were carried out for the stress acting in these two main directions. The investigation has shown that the AE method enables the detection of anisotropy in the structure of materials. The results of the research show that all four of the acoustic emission descriptors studied in this work are sensitive to the technological stages of these materials on the one hand and their structure anisotropy on the other. Fourier analysis of the recorded spectra provides interesting conclusions about the structural properties of composites as well as a lot of information about the bonding forces between the carbon atoms of which the CEG matrix is composed and the PFA polymer or turbostratic carbon.
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Authors and Affiliations

Sylwia Berdowska
1
Janusz Berdowski
1 2
Aubry Frederic
3

  1. Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czestochowa University of Technology, Al. Armii Krajowej 17, 42-200 Częstochowa, Poland
  2. Faculty of Science and Technology, J. Dlugosz University in Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Częstochowa, Poland
  3. Maitrise de Chimie-Physique, Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy, France
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Abstract

This paper investigates the preparation of silicon nitride composites with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Samples containing 1–10 wt% MWCNTs were ultrasonically processed in non-aqueous suspensions, dried, pressed, and then subjected to non-pressure sintering at 1600 °C for 2 h. The preliminary results showed that the mixture of activated silicon nitride and covered MWCNTs could be sintered. The porosity of the obtained samples ranged from 0.27 to 36.94 vol.%. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness) were also determined. Good hardness values were obtained for samples prepared by sintering the mechanically activated precursor under a flowing nitrogen atmosphere using the lowest fraction of CNTs. Residual activator reduced the densification of the composites.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marta Mikuśkiewicz
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Faculty of Materials Engineering, Department of Advanced Materials and Technologies, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Krasinskiego 8, 40-019 Katowice, Poland
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Abstract

In this scientific publication, research results of two newly developed hot-rolled Fe-Mn-Al-C (X105) and Fe-Mn-Al-Nb-Ti-C (X98) types of steel were compared. These types of steel are characterized by an average density of 6.68 g/cm³, a value 15% lower compared to conventional structural steel. Hot rolling was carried out on a semi-industrial line to evaluate the effect of hot plastic deformation conditions with different cooling variants on the structure. The detailed analysis of phase composition as well as microstructure allows us to state that the investigated steel is characterized by an austenitic-ferritic structure with carbides precipitates. The results of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests of both types of steel after hot rolling showed the occurrence of various deformation effects such as shear bands, micro bands, and lens twins in the microstructure. Based on the research undertaken with the use of transmission electron microscopy, it was found that the hardening mechanism of the X98 and X105 steel is deformation-induced plasticity by the formation of shear bands (SIP) and micro shear bands (MBIP).
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Authors and Affiliations

Liwia Sozańska-Jędrasik
1
Wojciech Borek
2
Janusz Mazurkiewicz
2

  1. Łukasiewicz Research Network–Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Department of Investigations of Properties and Structure of Materials, ul. K. Miarki 12-14, Gliwice 44-100, Poland
  2. Silesian University of Technology, Department of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, ul. Konarskiego 18a, Gliwice 44-100, Poland
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Abstract

S304H steel is used in the construction of pressure components of boilers with supercritical operating parameters. The paper presents the results of research on the microstructure following ageing for 30,000 hours at 650 and 700°C. Microstructure examination was performed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The precipitates were identified using transmission electron microscopy. The paper analyses the precipitation process and its dynamics depending on the temperature and ageing time in detail. MX carbonitrides and the ε_Cu phase were proved to be the most stable phase, regardless of the test temperature. It was also showed that the M₂₃C₆ carbide precipitates in the tested steel and the intermetallic sigma phase (σ) may play a significant role in the loss of durability of the tested steel. This is related to their significant increase due to the influence of elevated temperature, and their coagulation and coalescence dynamics strongly depend on the ageing/operating temperature level. The qualitative and quantitative identification of the secondary phase precipitation processes described in the study is important in the analysis of the loss of durability of the tested steel under creep conditions.
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Authors and Affiliations

Adam Zieliński
1
Robert Wersta
2
Marek Sroka
3
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Łukasiewicz Research Network – Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, ul. K. Miarki 12-14, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
  2. Office of Technical Inspection, Regional Branch Office based in Wrocław, ul. Grabiszyńska 51, 53-503 Wrocław, Poland
  3. Department of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Konarskiego 18a, 44 100 Gliwice, Poland
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Abstract

The rod specimens were produced from Pr9Fe50 + xCo13Zr1Nb4B23 – x (x = 0, 5, 8) alloys using the suction-casting technique. Subsequent devitrification annealing of those samples resulted in the change of their phase structure and magnetic properties. For annealed specimens of all investigated compositions, the Rietveld analyses of X-ray diffractions have shown the presence of three crystalline phases: the hard magnetic Pr2Fe11.2Co2.8B, soft magnetic α-Fe, and paramagnetic Pr1 + xFe4B4, which have precipitated within the amorphous matrix. This technique allowed us to determine the weight fractions of constituent phases. Furthermore, the microstructural changes with the alloy composition were observed. Magnetic measurements of annealed rods allowed us to calculate the switching field distributions (SFD) and δM plots in order to determine the strength and character of magnetic interactions between grains of constituent phases.
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Authors and Affiliations

Katarzyna Pawlik
1

  1. Department of Physics, Faculty of Production Engineering and Materials Technology, Częstochowa University of Technology, Al. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Częstochowa, Poland
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Abstract

Magnesium-based alloys are widely used in the construction, automotive, aviation and medical industries. There are many parameters that can be modified during their synthesis in order to obtain an alloy with the desired microstructure and advantageous properties. Modifications to the chemical composition and parameters of the synthesis process are of key importance. In this work, an Mg-based alloy with a rare-earth element addition was synthesized by means of mechanical alloying (MA). The aim of this work was to study the effect of milling times on the Mg-based alloy with a rare-earth addition on its structure and microhardness. A powder mixture of pure elements was milled in a SPEX 8000D high energy shaker ball mill under an argon atmosphere using a stainless steel container and balls. The sample was mechanically alloyed at the following milling times: 3, 5, 8 and 13 h, with 0.5 h interruptions. The microstructure and hardness of samples were investigated. The Mg-based powder alloy was examined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and using a Vickers microhardness test. The results showed that microhardness of the sample milled for 13 h was higher than that of those with milling time of 3, 5 and 8 h.
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Authors and Affiliations

Sabina Lesz
1
ORCID: ORCID
Bartłomiej Hrapkowicz
1
ORCID: ORCID
Klaudiusz Gołombek
1
Małgorzata Karolus
2
ORCID: ORCID
Patrycja Janiak
1

  1. Department of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Konarskiego 18A, 44-100, Gliwice, Poland
  2. Institute of Materials Engineering, University of Silesia, ul. 75 Pułku Piechoty 1a, 41-500 Chorzów, Poland
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Abstract

Magnesium-based materials constitute promising alternatives for medical applications, due to their characteristics, such as good mechanical and biological properties. This opens many possibilities for biodegradable materials to be used as less-invasive options for treatment. Degradation is prompted by their chemical composition and microstructure. Both those aspects can be finely adjusted by means of proper manufacturing processes, such as mechanical alloying (MA). Furthermore, MA allows for alloying elements that would normally be really hard to mix due to their very different properties. Magnesium usually needs various alloying elements, which can further increase its characteristics. Alloying magnesium with rare earth elements is considered to greatly improve the aforementioned properties. Due to that fact, erbium was used as one of the alloying elements, alongside zinc and calcium, to obtain an Mg₆₄Zn₃₀Ca₄Er₁ alloy via mechanical alloying. The alloy was milled in the SPEX 8000 Dual Mixer/Mill high energy mill under an argon atmosphere for 8, 13, and 20 hours. It was assessed using X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy and granulometric analysis as well as by studying its hardness. The hardness values reached 232, 250, and 302 HV, respectively, which is closely related to their particle size. Average particle sizes were 15, 16, and 17 μm, respectively
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Authors and Affiliations

Bartłomiej Hrapkowicz
1
ORCID: ORCID
Sabina Lesz
1
ORCID: ORCID
Marek Kremzer
1
ORCID: ORCID
Małgorzata Karolus
2
ORCID: ORCID
Wojciech Pakieła
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Department of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Konarskiego 18A, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
  2. Institute of Materials Engineering, University of Silesia, ul. 75 Pułku Piechoty 1a, 41-500 Chorzów, Poland
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Abstract

This research presents an experimental study carried out for the modeling and optimization of some technological parameters for the machining of metallic materials. Certain controllable factors were analyzed such as cutting speed, depth of cut, and feed per tooth. A dedicated research methodology was used to obtain a model which subsequently led to a process optimization by performing a required number of experiments utilizing the Minitab software application. The methodology was followed, and the optimal value of the surface roughness was obtained by the milling process for an aluminum alloy type 7136-T76511. A SECO cutting tool was used, which is standard in aluminum machining by milling. Experiments led to defining a cutting regime that was optimal and which shows that the cutting speed has a significant influence on the quality of the machined surface and the depth of cut and feed per tooth has a relatively small impact on the chosen ranges of process parameters.
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Authors and Affiliations

Aurel Mihail Titu
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
Alina Bianca Pop
3
Marcin Nabiałek
4
ORCID: ORCID
Camelia Cristina Dragomir
2 5
Andrei Victor Sandu
6 7
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, 10 Victoriei Street, 550024, Sibiu, Romania
  2. The Academy of Romanian Scientists, 54 Splaiul Independenței, Sector 5, 050085, Bucharest, Romania
  3. Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 62A Victor Babeș Street, Baia Mare, Romania
  4. Department of Physics, Częstochowa University of Technology, Al. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Częstochowa, Poland
  5. Transilvania University of Brasov, 500036 Brasov, Romania
  6. Gheorghe Asachi Technical University, Blvd. D. Mangeron 71, 700050 lasi, Romania
  7. Romanian Inventors Forum, Str. Sf. P. Movila 3, 700089 Iasi, Romania
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Abstract

Magnesium alloys have recently become increasingly popular in many sectors of the industry due to their unique properties, such as low density, high specific strength, vibration damping ability along with their recyclability and excellent machinability. Nowadays, thin films have been attracting more attention in applications that improve mechanical and corrosion properties. The following alloys were used for the coated Mg-Al-RE and the ultra-light magnesium-lithium alloy of the Mg-Li-Al-RE type. A single layer of TiO2 was deposited using the atomic layer deposition ALD method. Multiple layers of the Ti/TiO₂ and Ti/TiO₂/Ti/TiO₂ type were obtained by the MS-PVD magnetron sputtering technique. Samples were investigated by scanning and a transmission electron microscope (SEM, TEM) and their morphology was studied by an atomic forces microscope (AFM). Further examinations, including electrochemical corrosion, roughness and tribology, were also carried out. As a result of the research, it was found that the best electrochemical properties are exhibited by single TiO2 layers obtained by the ALD method. Moreover, it was found that the Ti/TiO₂/Ti/TiO₂ double film has better properties than the Ti/TiO₂ film.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marcin Staszuk
1
Łukasz Reimann
1
Aleksandra Ściślak
1
Justyna Jaworska
1
Mirosława Pawlyta
1
Tomasz Mikuszewski
2
Dariusz Kuc
2
Tomasz Tański
1
Antonín Kříž
3

  1. Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, ul. Konarskiego 18a, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
  2. Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Engineering and Metallurgy, ul. Krasińskiego 8, Katowice, Poland
  3. University of West Bohemia, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Univerzitni 22 St., 30614 Plzen, Czech Republic
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Abstract

In this paper, thermal oxidation resistance of silicide-coated niobium substrates was tested in a temperature range of 1300–1450°C using an HVOF burner. Pure niobium specimens were coated using the pack cementation CVD method. Three different silicide thickness coatings were deposited. Thermal oxidation resistance of the coated niobium substrates was tested in a temperature range of 1300–1450°C using an HVOF burner. All samples that passed the test showed their ability to stabilize the temperature over a time of 30 s during the thermal test. The rise time of substrate temperature takes about 10 s, following which it keeps constant values. In order to assess the quality of the Nb-Si coatings before and after the thermal test, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) along with chemical analysis (EDS), X-ray diffraction XRD and Vickers hardness test investigation were performed. Results confirmed the presence of substrate Nb compounds as well as Si addition. The oxygen compounds are a result of high temperature intense oxidizing environment that causes the generation of SiO phase in the form of quartz and cristobalite during thermal testing. Except for one specimen, all substrate surfaces pass the high temperature oxidation test with no damages.
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Authors and Affiliations

Radosław Szklarek
1 2 3
Tomasz Tański
1
Bogusław Mendala
1
Marcin Staszuk
1
Łukasz Krzemiński
1
Paweł Nuckowski
1
Kamil Sobczak
3

  1. Silesian University of Technology, ul. Akademicka 2A, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
  2. Spinex Spinkiewicz Company, Klimontowska 19, 04-672 Warsaw, Poland
  3. Łukasiewicz Research Network – Institute of Aviation, al. Krakowska 110/114, 02-256 Warsaw, Poland
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Abstract

The growing interest in one-dimensional tin oxide-based nanomaterials boosts research on both high-quality nanomaterials as well as production methods. This is due to the fact that they present unique electrical and optical properties that enable their application in various (opto)electronic devices. Thus, the aim of the paper was to produce ceramic SnO₂ nanowires using electrospinning with the calcination method, and to investigate the influence of the calcination temperature on the morphology, structure and optical properties of the obtained material. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to examine the morphology and chemical structure of obtained nanomaterials. The optical properties of manufactured one-dimensional nanostructures were investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Moreover, based on the UV-Vis spectra, the energy band gap of the prepared nanowires was determined. The analysis of the morphology of the obtained nanowires showed that both the concentration of the precursor in the spinning solution and the calcination temperature have a significant impact on the diameter of the nanowires and, consequently, on their optical properties.
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Authors and Affiliations

Tomasz Tański
1
Weronika Smok
1
Wiktor Matysiak
1

  1. Department of Engineering Material and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Konarskiego 18A, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
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Abstract

The paper presents the main issues of the management of electrical grids. Selected information technology tools supporting electrical grids maintenance are presented. In electrical infrastructure maintenance of power companies, geographic information systems are increasingly used to support the management of their resources. Their functionalities in terms of creating comprehensive databases for the electrical infrastructure of the power sector are described. The important information technology tools regarding spatial systems for supporting maintenance and operation management electrical grids and the conditions of their implementation are presented. This paper also attempts to present an innovative multidimensional evaluation of the technical and economic benefits resulting from the use of modern information technology tools for the management of energy infrastructure.
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Authors and Affiliations

Waldemar Kamrat
1

  1. Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical and Control Engineering, Power Engineering Department, ul. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland
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Abstract

The increasing demand for electricity and global attention to the environment has led energy planners and developers to explore developing control techniques for energy stability. The primary objective function of this research in an interconnected electrical power system to increase the stability of the system with the proposed RRVR technique is evaluated in terms of the different constraints like THD (%), steady-state error (%), settling time (s), overshoot (%), efficiency (%) and to maintain the frequency at a predetermined value, and controlling the change of the power flow of control between the areas renewable energy generation (solar, wind, and fuel cell with battery management system) based intelligent grid system. To provide high-quality, reliable and stable electrical power, the designed controller should perform satisfactorily, that is, suppress the deviation of the load frequency. The performance of linear controllers on non-linear power systems has not yet been found to be effective in overcoming this problem. In this work, a fractional high-order differential feedback controller (FHODFC) is proposed for the LFC problems in a multi-area power system. The gains of FHODFC are best adjusted by resilience random variance reduction technique (RRVR) designed to minimize the overall weighted absolute error performance exponential time. Therefore, the controller circuit automatically adjusts the duty cycle value to obtain a desired constant output voltage value, despite all the grid system’s source voltage and load output changes. The proposed interconnected multi-generation energy generation topology is established in MATLAB 2017b software.
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Authors and Affiliations

B. Prakash Ayyappan
1
R. Kanimozhi
2

  1. Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, V.S.B Engineering College, Karur and Research Scholar (Electrical), Anna University, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India
  2. Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, University College of Engineering, Anna University-BIT Campus, Tiruchirapalli, Tamilnadu, India
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Abstract

Diagnostic methodologies are of fundamental importance for operational strategies of electrical devices, both in the power grid and in industrial applications. This paper reports about a novel approach based on partial discharge analysis applied to high voltage electrical insulation. Especially dynamics of charges deposited by partial discharges is explored applying a chopped sequence. The applications refer to microvoids occurring inside solid insulating systems or at the interfaces, such as delaminations at the electrodes. The experiments were carried out on embedded voids having distinctive wall dielectric materials. The underlying physical phenomena of post discharge charge transport are analyzed. The assessment is performed using phase-resolved partial discharge patterns acquired applying a chopped sequence. The chopped partial discharge (CPD) method provides quantitative insight into post discharge charge decay processes due to deposited and accumulated charges fluctuations. The assessment indicator is based on comparing partial discharge inception angle between chopped sequence and continuous run. The experiments have shown that materials with distinctive surface conductivity revealed adequately different charge decay time dynamics. The detailed analysis yields time constant of walls charge decay for insulating paper equal to 12 ms and cross-linked polyethylene 407 ms. The CPD method may be further used to investigate streamer physics inside bounded cavities in the form of voids. The presented method provides a quantitative approach for charge non-invasive decay assessment and offers high potential in future diagnostics applications.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marek Florkowski
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electrical and Power Engineering, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

Self-healing grids are one of the most developing concepts applied in electrical engineering. Each restoration strategy requires advanced algorithms responsible for the creation of local power systems. Multi-agent automation solutions dedicated for smart grids are mostly based on Prim’s algorithm. Graph theory in that field also leaves many problems unsolved. This paper is focused on a variation of Prim’s algorithm utility for a multi-sourced power system topology. The logic described in the paper is a novel concept combined with a proposal of a multi-parametrized weight calculation formula representing transmission features of energy delivered to loads present in a considered grid. The weight is expressed as the combination of three elements: real power, reactive power, and real power losses. The proposal of a novel algorithm was verified in a simulation model of a power system. The new restoration logic was compared with the proposal of the strategy presented in other recently published articles. The novel concept of restoration strategy dedicated to multi-sourced power systems was verified positively by simulations. The proposed solution proved its usefulness and applicability.
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Authors and Affiliations

Artur Łukaszewski
ORCID: ORCID
Łukasz Nogal
ORCID: ORCID
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Abstract

This paper investigates the non-fragile event-triggered control of positive switched systems with random nonlinearities and controller perturbations. The random nonlinearities and controller perturbations are assumed to obey Bernoulli and Binomial sequence, respectively. A class of linear event-triggering conditions is introduced. A switched linear co-positive Lyapunov function is constructed for the systems. For the same probability with respect to nonlinearities and controller perturbations in each subsystem, a non-fragile controller of positive switched systems is designed in terms of linear programming. Then, the different probability case is considered and the corresponding non-fragile event-triggered control is explored. Finally, the effectiveness of theoretical findings is verified via two examples.
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Authors and Affiliations

Yanqi Wu
1
Junfeng Zhang
1
Shizhou Fu
1

  1. School of Automation, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018, China
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Abstract

In the paper we propose a fractional-piecewise-constant-order PID controller and discuss the stability and robustness of a closed loop system. In stability analysis we use the transform method and include the Nyquist-like criteria. Simulations for designed controllers are performed for the second-order plant with a delay.
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Authors and Affiliations

Piotr Oziablo
1
Dorota Mozyrska
1
Malgorzata Wyrwas
1

  1. Bialystok University of Technology, ul. Wiejska 45A, 15-351 Bialystok, Poland
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Abstract

All universities are responsible for assessing the quality of education. One of the required factors is the results of the students’ research. The procedure involves, most often, the preparation of the questionnaire by the staff, which is voluntarily answered by students; then, the university staff uses the statistical methods to analyze data and prepare reports. The proposed EQE method by the application of the fuzzy relations and the optimistic fuzzy aggregation norm may show a closer connection between the students’ answers and the achieved results. Moreover, the objects obtained by the application of the EQE method can be visualized by using the t-SNE technique, cosine between vectors and distances of points in five-dimensional space.
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Authors and Affiliations

Grzegorz Śmigielski
1
ORCID: ORCID
Aleksandra Mreła
1
ORCID: ORCID
Oleksandr Sokolov
2
ORCID: ORCID
Mykoła Nedashkovskyy
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz, Institute of Informatics, ul. Kopernika 1, 85-074 Bydgoszcz, Poland
  2. Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, ul. Grudziądzka 5, 87-100 Toruń, Poland
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Abstract

Developing novel methods, approaches and computational techniques is essential for solving efficiently more and more demanding up-to-date engineering problems. Designing durable, light and eco-friendly structures starts at the conceptual stage, where new efficient design and optimization tools need to be implemented. Nowadays, apart from the traditional gradient-based methods applied to optimal structural and material design, innovative techniques based on versatile heuristic concepts, like for example Cellular Automata, are implemented. Cellular Automata are built to represent mechanical systems where the special local update rules are implemented to mimic the performance of complex systems. This paper presents a novel concept of flexible Cellular Automata rules and their implementation into topology optimization process. Despite a few decades of development, topology optimization still remains one of the most important research fields within the area of structural and material design. One can notice novel ideas and formulations as well as new fields of their implementation. What stimulates that progress is that the researcher community continuously works on innovative and efficient topology optimization methods and algorithms. The proposed algorithm combined with an efficient analysis system ANSYS offers a fast convergence of the topology generation process and allows obtaining well-defined final topologies.
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Authors and Affiliations

Katarzyna Tajs-Zielińska
1
Bogdan Bochenek
1

  1. Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Cracow University of Technology, Al. Jana Pawła II 37, 31-864 Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

This paper considers the problem of the accurate task space finite-time control susceptible to both undesirable disturbance forces exerted on the end-effector and unknown friction forces coming from joints directly driven by the actuators as well as unstructured forces resulting from the kinematic singularities appearing on the mechanism trajectory. We obtain a class of estimated extended transposed Jacobian controllers which seem to successfully counteract the external disturbance forces on the basis of a suitably defined task-space non-singular terminal sliding manifold (TSM) and the Lyapunov stability theory. Moreover, in order to overcome (or to minimise) the undesirable chattering effects, the proposed robust control law involves the second-order sliding technique. The numerical simulations (closely related to an experiment) ran for a mobile manipulator consisting of a non-holononic platform of (2;0) type and a holonomic manipulator of two revolute kinematic pairs show the performance of the proposed controllers and make a comparison with other well-known control schemes.
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Authors and Affiliations

Mirosław Galicki
1

  1. Centrum Badan Kosmicznych Polskiej Akademii Nauk, ul. Bartycka 18A, 00-716 Warsaw, Poland
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Abstract

The paper contains a description of the geometry of Beveloid gears. It describes the distribution of forces in a Beveloid gear with a straight tooth line and a helical tooth line. The paper presents research on the experimentally determined parameters of transmission operation, including the sound pressure level and the amount of heat emitted during operation. The design and construction of the test stand were presented. The research methodology was described. Operational tests are carried out on household appliances with Beveloid gears: Grinder and Jam mixer. Thanks to an appropriately selected narrowing angle, estimated values of service life extension of the above-mentioned transmissions are given.
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Authors and Affiliations

Piotr Strojny
1

  1. The Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics, Rzeszow University of Technology, al. Powstańców Warszawy 12, 35-959 Rzeszów, Poland
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Abstract

3D scanning measurements are gaining popularity every year. Quick inspections on already captured point clouds are easy to prepare with the use of modern software and machine learning. To achieve repeatability and accuracy, some surface and measurement issues should be considered and resolved before the inspection. Large numbers of manufacturing scans are not intended for manual correction. This article is a case study of a small surface inspection of a turbine guide vane based on 3D scans. Small surface errors cannot be neglected as their incorrect inspection can result in serious faults in the final product. Contour recognition and deletion seem to be a rational method for making a scan inspection with the same level of accuracy as we have now for CMM machines. The main reason why a scan inspection can be difficult is that the CAD source model can be slightly different from the inspected part. Not all details are always included, and small chamfers and blends can be added during the production process, based on manufacturing standards and best practices. This problem does not occur during a CMM (coordinate measuring machine) inspection, but it may occur in a general 3D scanning inspection.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marcin Jamontt
1
Paweł Pyrzanowski
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. General Electric Company, al Krakowska 110-114, 02-265 Warsaw, Poland
  2. Institute of Aeronautics and Applied Mechanics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Nowowiejska 24, 00-665 Warsaw, Poland
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Abstract

The application of micro components in various fields such as biomedical, medical, automobile, electronics, automobile and aviation significantly improved. To manufacture the micro components, different techniques exist in the non-traditional machining process. In those techniques, electrochemical micromachining (ECMM) exhibits a unique machining nature, such as no tool wear, non-contact machining process, residual stress, and heat-affected zone. Hence, in this study, micro holes were fabricated on the copper work material. The sodium nitrate (NaNO₃) electrolyte is considered for the experiments. During the experiments, magnetic fields strength along with UV rays are applied to the electrolyte. The L₁₈ orthogonal array (OA) experimental design is planned with electrolyte concentration (EC), machining voltage (MV), duty cycle (DC) and electrolyte temperature (ET). The optimization techniques such as similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS), VlseKriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR) and grey relational analysis (GRA) were employed to find the optimal parameter combinations. The entropy weight method is used to assess the weight of responses such as MR and OC. The optimal combination using TOPSIS, VIKOR and GRA methods shows the same results for the experimental runs 8, 9 and 7, and the best optimal parameter combination is 28 g/l EC, 11 V MV, 85 % DC and 37°C ET. Based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA) results, electrolyte concentration plays a significant role by contributing 86 % to machining performance. The second and least contributions are DC (3.86 %) and ET (1.74 %) respectively on the performance. Furthermore, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images analyses are carried out to understand the effect of magnetic field and heated electrolyte on the work material.
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Authors and Affiliations

K.G. Saravanan
R. Thanigaivelan
M. Soundarrajan
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Abstract

Specific emitter identification (SEI) can distinguish single-radio transmitters using the subtle features of the received waveform. Therefore, it is used extensively in both military and civilian fields. However, the traditional identification method requires extensive prior knowledge and is time-consuming. Furthermore, it imposes various effects associated with identifying the communication radiation source signal in complex environments. To solve the problem of the weak robustness of the hand-crafted feature method, many scholars at home and abroad have used deep learning for image identification in the field of radiation source identification. However, the classification method based on a real-numbered neural network cannot extract In-phase/Quadrature (I/Q)-related information from electromagnetic signals. To address these shortcomings, this paper proposes a new SEI framework for deep learning structures. In the proposed framework, a complex-valued residual network structure is first used to mine the relevant information between the in-phase and orthogonal components of the radio frequency baseband signal. Then, a one-dimensional convolution layer is used to a) directly extract the features of a specific one-dimensional time-domain signal sequence, b) use the attention mechanism unit to identify the extracted features, and c) weight them according to their importance. Experiments show that the proposed framework having complex-valued residual networks with attention mechanism has the advantages of high accuracy and superior performance in identifying communication radiation source signals.
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Authors and Affiliations

Lingzhi Qu
1
Junan Yang
1
Keju Huang
1
Hui Liu
1

  1. College of Electronic Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230037, People’s Republic of China
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Abstract

The paper analyzes the operation of innovative composite measurement instrumentation for spontaneous electromagnetic emission. The designed receiver measures and records both components of the EM field emitted by rocks subjected to increased mechanical stress. The range of signals transmitted by the receiver system and its dynamics were determined. A receiver was used to observe electromagnetic signals generated during a hard coal sample crushing in laboratory conditions. Test results confirmed the high dynamic range of the system at 98 dB and the ability to observe signals over a range of frequencies up to 50 kHz. The experimental results confirm the signal bandwidth characteristic of coal mine EM field emission obtained in earlier studies. The constructed autonomous receiver can be used in mine workings as a complementary warning system for emerging mine hazards.
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Authors and Affiliations

Remigiusz Mydlikowski
1
ORCID: ORCID
Krzysztof Maniak
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Photonics and Microsystems, ul. Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wrocław, Poland
  2. National Institute of Telecommunications, ul. Szachowa 1, 04-894 Warsaw, Poland
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Abstract

In this paper, design, construction and switching parameters of a self-made optical shutter with scalable aperture were reported. The aim of the study was to obtain the shortest possible switching times, minimum shutter open time and comparable with commercial shutter, the switch-on and switch-off times. For this purpose, numerical simulations were performed using Comsol Multiphysics 5.4. The design of the shutter and the control system have been optimized accordingly to the obtained results of numerical simulations. The optimized design was fabricated in a professional mechanical workshop and operational parameters of the constructed device were investigated. The switching parameters of the shutter, such as opening time, closing time, minimum shutter open time and other parameters were measured. The values of the parameters were determined from a statistical analysis of a sample consisting of 10,000 measurement results. The performed characterization showed that the tested device has the opening time of 0.8 ms, while the closing time is approximately 1 ms. The designed device is characterized by the minimum shutter open time of 6.4 ms.
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Authors and Affiliations

Piotr Pokryszka
1
ORCID: ORCID
Mateusz Wośko
1
ORCID: ORCID
Wojciech Kijaszek
1
ORCID: ORCID
Regina Paszkiewicz
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Wrocław University of Science and Technology, wybrzeze Stanislawa Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw, Poland

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