Applied sciences

Archives of Foundry Engineering

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Archives of Foundry Engineering | 2023 | vol. 23 | No 1

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Abstract

A problem is defined to investigate the effect of titanium traces on the corrosion behaviour of low carbon steel. In theory titanium effects surface properties like abrasion resistance in medium carbon steels and corrosion resistance in low as well as medium carbon steels. The present research as indicated by the topic is aimed to experimentally mark the effect of titanium traces on corrosion resistance in the available low carbon steel specimens.
The effect of microalloying with titanium (i.e.0.02wt.%) on the corrosion behavior of low carbon steel in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was studied by electrochemical, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The electrochemical results showed that the corrosion of the Ti-bearing steel improved by around 30% compared with the Ti-free steel. The titanium microalloying led to the formation of a more compact corrosion product layer on the metal surface. The SEM analysis showed that the Ti-bearing sample had a smoother surface compared with the Ti-free steel.
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Authors and Affiliations

Ali R. Sheikh
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

The process of investment casting of AZ91 magnesium alloy open-cell porosity foams was analysed. A basic investment casting technique was modified to enable the manufacturing of magnesium foams of chosen porosities in a safe and effective way. Various casting parameters (mould temperature, metal pouring temperature, pressure during metal pouring and solidifying) were calculated and analysed to assure complete mould filling and to minimize surface reactions with mould material. The foams manufactured with this method have been tested for their mechanical strength and collapsing behaviour. The AZ91 foams acquired in this research turned out to have very high open porosity level (>80%) and performed with Young’s modulus of ~30 MPa on average. Their collapsing mechanism has turned out to be mostly brittle. Magnesium alloy foams of such morphology may find their application in fields requiring lightweight materials of high strength to density ratio or of high energy absorption properties, as well as in biomedical implants due to magnesium’s high biocompatibility and its mechanical properties similar to bone tissue.
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Authors and Affiliations

H. Kapłon
1
ORCID: ORCID
A. Dmitruk
1
ORCID: ORCID
K. Naplocha
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Poland
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Abstract

‘Dhokra’ or ‘Dokra’ casting is a sophisticated cast metal craft tradition of the Indian subcontinent. It has been practiced by the countryfolk now since the Copper Age. It is a lost wax casting process in the hot clay mold. The technology is such sophisticated that it can produce up to 400 μm thin-walled hollow cast products with complicated and intricate shapes using Brass, Bronze, Copper, and other copper alloys. The investigation was for engraving Brass (2% lead) which is used by Dhokra artisans nowadays. In a field visit during dimensional analysis, one discrepancy was identified. The metal thicknesses of hollow castings are thicker than the thickness of the wax pattern. This cast metal dilation phenomenon is unusual. Shrinkage of metals compared to the pattern dimension is familiar in the casting world. The same abnormalities in the repeated investigation at different sites were observed. All the studies and experiments were organized to explain the reason hidden behind the phenomenon.
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Authors and Affiliations

S. Roy
1
ORCID: ORCID
A.K. Pramanick
1
P.K. Datta
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Dept. of Metallurgical and Material Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032, India
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Abstract

In the present investigation, the influence of addition of the rare earth element samarium (Sm) in different concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9wt.%) on the microstructure and tensile properties of the Al-Si-Cu 319 alloy have been evaluated. Microstructural constituents such as SDAS of α-Al and characteristics of eutectic silicon particles were observed by optical microscopy. It was concluded from the findings that Sm addition reduces the size of secondary dendrite arm spacings (SDAS) and altered the morphology of the eutectic silicon particles from needle-like to lamellar and smaller segments. The tensile properties of the Al-Si-Cu 319 alloy improved with the concentration of Sm. It was found that the highest tensile properties were obtained at 0.7wt.% addition of Sm, i.e., 55.5% higher than unmodified 319 alloy. With the further addition of the Sm above 0.7wt.%, it does not improve the tensile properties of the alloy. This can be attributed to the precipitation of the brittle and needle like quaternary Sm-rich intermetallic compounds observed through Scanning electron microscopy.
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Authors and Affiliations

D.N. Patel
1
M.P. Sutaria
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chandubhai S. Patel Institute of Technology, Charotar University of Science and Technology (CHARUSAT), Changa, Anand-388421, Gujarat, India
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Abstract

The paper presents the assumptions and methodology for investigating equivalent heat load testing of hot aircraft engine components. The basic heat loads occurring in an aircraft engine during aircraft flight are characterised. Diagrams of the proposed heat loads are presented, together with the number of cycles, and a test bench is characterised and shown to enable equivalent heat load testing of aircraft engine components.
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Bibliography

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Authors and Affiliations

M. Mróz
1
ORCID: ORCID
A.W. Orłowicz
1
ORCID: ORCID
M. Tupaj
1
ORCID: ORCID
M. Lenik
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Rzeszow University of Technology, Al. Powstańców Warszawy 12, 35-959 Rzeszów, Poland
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Abstract

The article presents tests on a new lead-free bronze CuSn4Zn2PS, intended for fittings for contact with drinking water, in which the addition of lead was replaced with sulphur. The subject of the experimental work was the production of semi-finished products from this alloy based on the charge coming entirely from waste generated after machining. A specialized pilot line was used for the tests, and after cleaning, the waste was melted and then were continuously cast in the form of rods and hollow rods. The cleaning efficiency was assessed, and the manufactured semi-finished products were subjected to tests, including the assessment of the chemical and mechanical homogeneity and the structure of the test batch of the semi-finished casting products in terms of the possibility of manufacturing products meeting the requirements of technical specifications. The obtained results, both in terms of a stable chemical composition, homogeneous and reproducible mechanical properties, fully compliant with the specifications for fittings bronzes (CC499K), as well as the lack of faults of the obtained semi-finished products, despite a very large share of waste material, indicate the possibility of using the tested recycling method for the production of semi-products of sulphur bronze, which is an alloy that is relatively difficult to manufacture.
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Bibliography

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Authors and Affiliations

W. Malec
1
ORCID: ORCID
B. Cwolek
1
ORCID: ORCID
A. Brudny
1
ORCID: ORCID
B. Juszczyk
1
ORCID: ORCID
J. Kulasa
1
ORCID: ORCID
A. Hury
1
ORCID: ORCID
W. Marek
2
K. Stolorz
2
D. Wróbel
2
A. Filipowicz
2

  1. Łukasiewicz Research Network — Institute of Non-Ferrous Metals, Poland
  2. COGNOR S.A. Oddział OM Szopienice w Katowicach, Poland
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Abstract

Cooling slope casting is a simple technique to produce semi-solid feedstock with a non-dendritic structure. The cooling slope technique depends on various parameters like slope length, slope angle, pouring temperature etc, that has been investigated in the present study. This work presents an extensive study to comprehend the combined effect of slope angle, slope length, pouring temperature, on hardness and microstructure of A383 alloy. Response Surface Methodology was adopted for design of experiments with varying process parameters i.e. slope angle between 15° to 60°, slope length between 400 to 700 mm, and pouring temperature between 560 ºC to 600 ºC. The response factor hardness was analysed using ANOVA to understand the effect of input parameters and their interactions. The hardness was found to be increasing with increased slope length and pouring temperature; and decreased with slope angle. The empirical relation for response with parameters were established using the regression analysis and are incorporated in an optimization model. The optimum hardness with non-dendritic structure of A383 alloy was obtained at 27° slope angle, 596.5 mm slope length and 596 ºC pouring temperature. The results were successfully verified by confirmation experiment, which shows around 2% deviation from the predicted hardness (87.11 BHN).
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Bibliography

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Authors and Affiliations

M.S. Rao
1
ORCID: ORCID
H. Khandelwal
1
ORCID: ORCID
M. Kumar
1
A. Kumar
1

  1. National Institute of Advanced Manufacturing Technology (Formerly National Institute of Foundry and Forge Technology) (A Centrally Funded Technical Institute under MHRD), Hatia, Ranchi, 834003, India
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Abstract

This paper presents a numerical model for the horizontal continuous casting of cast iron (HCCCI). A computational three-dimensional (3D) steady-state, coupled with fluid flow and heat transfer simulation model was developed and validated against experimental results to study the shell thickness and solidification of ductile cast iron. The study introduces the influence of an air gap at the melt-mould interface, which has long been known to have a detrimental effect on the efficiency of the process. The effect of the length and thickness of the melt-mould air gaps (also referred to as top air gaps) on solidification and remelting of the solid strand is studied. Parametric studies on top air gaps suggested a substantial effect on the solid and eutectic area at the top-outlet end of the die when the length of air gas was varied. This study serves to create a foundational and working model with the overall objective of process optimisation and analyzing the effect of operating process input parameters on the shell thickness of the strand.
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Authors and Affiliations

A. Chawla
1
ORCID: ORCID
N.S. Tiedje
1
ORCID: ORCID
J. Spangenberg
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
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Abstract

The article discusses issues related to the melting of grey and ductile cast iron in terms of metallurgical quality. The derivative and thermal analysis (DTA) was used to assess this quality. The article presents the results of research carried out in industrial conditions and analysed by the Itaca system. In the paper, the effect of the furnace type, the charge materials and the inoculation process on the parameters characterising the cast iron being melted was analysed. The most important of these are the minimum eutectic temperature (Te min), the liquidus temperature (T liquidus) and the nucleation rate. The results of the research and calculations are shown in graphs and as dependencies. Some of DTA results were compared to the microstructure analysis results. The article shows that the derivative and thermal analysis is a very effective tool in the assessment of the metallurgical quality of cast iron. It is a very good addition to chemical analysis. Based on the results of the research, it was concluded that a very high correlation exists between the rate of nucleation (DTA) and the number of graphite nuclei (microstructure analysis). Furthermore, it was also found that an improvement in nucleation could be achieved by ensuring a high value of carbon equivalent (CE) and, above all, by conducting the primary and secondary inoculation processes, respectively.
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Bibliography

[1] Stefanescu, D.M., Suarez, R. & Kim S.B, (2020). 90 years of thermal analysis as a control tool in the melting of cast iron. China Foundry. 17(2), 69-84. https://doi.org/10.1007/s41230-020-0039-x.
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[6] Jura, S., Studnicki, A., Przybył, M. & Jura, Z. (2001). Application of the ATD method to assess the quality of ductile cast iron. Archiwum Odlewnictwa. 1(1), 93-102. (in Polish).
[7] Gawroński, J., Szajnar, J., Jura, Z. & Studnicki, A. (2004). Professor Stanisław Jura, creator of the theory and industrial applications of diagnostics and wear of metals and alloys. Archiwum Odlewnictwa. 4(SI 16), 1-74. (in Polish).
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[10] Pietrowski, S. & Gumienny, G. (2002). Evaluation of the quality of ductile cast iron EN-GJS-400-15 by the TDA method. Archiwum Odlewnictwa. 2(6), 257-268. (in Polish).
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Authors and Affiliations

J. Kołakowski
1
ORCID: ORCID
M. Brzeżański
1
ORCID: ORCID
D. Burdzy
1
ORCID: ORCID
J. Sobieraj
1
M. Urbanowicz
1
T. Paruch
1
K. Janerka
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. “Śrem” Iron Foundry Sp. z o.o., ul. Staszica 1, 63-100 Śrem, Poland
  2. Department of Foundry Engineering, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Towarowa 7, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
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Abstract

The heat-cured core-making process has been applied for over 60 years to produce molds and cores for different types of castings. The following technologies can be classified into the terminology of “heat-cured coremaking process”: croning-, hot-box -, and warm-box process. The latest technology provides good workability of core mixture, good strength properties, dimensional stability, and good knockout performance of the sand cores. Despite all its advantages, the warm-box technology is less widespread in foundries due to the cost of the high quality thermosetting resin and the maintenance cost of the core box. In this study, the influence of the acid hardener content on the hardening characteristics (bending strength), collapsibility, and the benchlife of the warm-box sand cores were investigated. From the results, it can be said, that within the investigated composition range, increasing the acid hardener content will improve the bending strength of the sand cores. The increased acid hardener content results in higher thermal stability at the beginning of the thermal exposure, and smaller residual bending strength after 15 minutes of thermal loading. The acid hardener level has little effect on the benchlife of the warm-box sand cores, although the sand core mixture is very sensitive to the combined effect of the sand temperature and dwelling time.
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Authors and Affiliations

I. Budavári
1
ORCID: ORCID
H. Hudák
1
G. Fegyverneki
1

  1. University of Miskolc, Faculty of Materials Science of Engineering, Institute of Foundry, Hungry
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Abstract

The exothermic insulating riser played an important role in the solidification process of metal liquid for the improvement of casting quality. This paper focused on the use of organosilicon slag to replace part of the aluminum powder as an exothermic agent for the riser, to reduce production costs and turn waste into treasure. The experiments firstly studied the effect of organosilicon slag content on the combustion temperature and holding time and determined the components of the riser exothermic agent and organosilicon slag. On this basis, the effects of the content of Na3AlF6 flux and alkali phenolic resin binder on the combustion heating time and strength properties of the riser were studied. And the ratio of mixed oxidants was determined by single-factor orthogonal experiments to optimize the addition of three oxidants, Fe3O4, MnO2, and KNO3. Finally, the performance of the riser prepared after optimization was compared with that of the riser prepared with general aluminum powder. The results showed that with the mixture of 21% organosilicon slag and 14% aluminum powder as the exothermic agent, the highest combustion temperature of the prepared exothermic insulating riser was 1451℃ and the holding time was 193 s; the optimal content of Na3AlF6 flux was 4%, and the best addition alkali phenolic resin binder was 12%; the optimized mixing ratio of three oxidants was 12% for Fe3O4, 6% for MnO2, and 6% for KNO3. Under the optimized ratio, the maximum combustion temperature of the homemade riser was 52℃ and the heat preservation time was 14% longer compared with the conventional exothermic insulating riser with 25-35% aluminum powder.
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Authors and Affiliations

Jijun Lu
1
ORCID: ORCID
Jiangbing Qian
1
ORCID: ORCID
Lei Yang
1
ORCID: ORCID
Huafang Wang
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Wuhan Textile University, China
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Abstract

To prepare a high-quality asymmetrical bending pipe of aluminum alloy by casting, the parting surfaces of the asymmetrical parts were determined based on the characteristics of the parts. Also, the forming process was designed and calculated. After that, the different types of gating systems were designed and the casting process was calculated by ProCAST, and then the influence of different casting gating systems on asymmetrical bending pipes was analyzed. The simulation results show that in the solidification process, although the filling speed of the single runner was slow, but the filling was stable. The gating system with a single runner-round flange filling system would lead to being more uniform for filling flow field and be sequential solidification of temperature field distribution, and stronger of the feeding ability. During the solidification process, the solid phase ratio of the single runner-round flange casting system is larger, and the shrinkage volume is smaller, which made the quality of castings better. Finally, a metal mold and core were made to cast a perfect asymmetric bending pipe of aluminum alloy product in a die casting machine. So the single runner-round flange filling system is suitable for asymmetrical bending pipe casting.
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Authors and Affiliations

Ning Wang
1
ORCID: ORCID
Rong Li
1
ORCID: ORCID
ZiQi Zhang
1
Qi. Zeng
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. School of Mechanical & Electrical Engineering, Guizhou Normal University
  2. Guiyang Huaheng Mechanical Manufacture CO., LTD, China
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Abstract

Coffee is grown in over 50 countries around the world, and its sale is the largest in the world trade after crude oil. In the case of coffee beans, after consumption remains a solid waste in the form of a waste plant extract. At present, coffee waste is not fully managed, which means that it is often deposited in landfills. Taking into account their availability on the market and the content of significant amounts of carbon in them, it was proposed to use them as a reducing agent in the processing of copper slags. The use of Solid Coffee Grounds (SCG) as an alternative reducing agent for coke and coke breeze can be beneficial in two aspects. The first is the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the process, and the second is due to the possible release of hydrocarbons from these wastes at high temperatures, which, apart from participating in the reduction process itself, causes also mixing of the bath in the melting unit, which facilitates the process of copper sedimentation in the slag. The experiments carried out on a laboratory scale showed the possibility of reducing the copper content in the slag after the reduction process from 10.3 to 0.41 % by mass. The obtained values of the relative degree of copper splashing for all experiments ranged from 88.4 to 96.0 %. The presented solution is an innovative approach to the use of SCG in the processing of copper slags.
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Authors and Affiliations

T. Matuła
1
ORCID: ORCID
Ł. Kortyka
Ł. Myćka
2
J. Łabaj
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
T. Wojtal
1

  1. Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Engineering, Krasińskiego 8, 40-019 Katowice, Poland
  2. Łukasiewicz Research Network - Institute of Non-Ferrous Metals, Sowińskiego 5, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
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Abstract

The chemical composition of alloys plays an important role at their crystallization and influences the solid phase formation, and thus, microstructure and properties. The present paper studies the release of the heat of crystallization of alloyed wear-resistant cast irons in order to determine the quantitative patterns of the chemical composition influence to the kinetics of crystallization. The differential thermal analysis was applied to get the data of heat release, its rate at cast iron temperature decrease. The normalized dependence of the amount of crystallization heat over time was obtained. The main temperature parameters were analyzed and four stages at irons crystallization were established and characterized with their duration and released heat. The multiple correlation analysis allowed considering a numerous physical and chemical factors and distinguishing their role at crystallization of irons. As a result, the quantitative regularities are determined of influencing the content of alloying elements, impurities and carbides on a heat and time of crystallization at the different stages of solidification, which are of great importance in developing alloyed irons with required quality and properties.
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Authors and Affiliations

Y. Aftandiliants
1
ORCID: ORCID
S. Gnyloskurenko
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
H. Meniailo
3
ORCID: ORCID
V. Khrychikov
3
ORCID: ORCID
V. Lomakin
4
ORCID: ORCID

  1. National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Ukraine
  2. Physical and Technological Institute of Metals and Alloys, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Ukraine
  3. Ukrainian State University of Science and Technologies, Ukraine
  4. Central Ukrainian National Technical University, Ukraine
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Abstract

The paper deals with the possibilities of influencing the final microstructure of aluminium alloy castings by changing the external conditions of crystallization and solidification. Aluminum alloys, especially Al-Si alloys, are nowadays one of the most used non-ferrous metal alloys, especially due to their mass application in the automotive field. It is in this industry that extreme emphasis is placed on the quality of cast parts with regard to safety. For this reason, a key production parameter is the mastery of the control of the resulting microstructure of the castings and the associated internal quality, which is subject to high demands defined by international standards. The aim of the experiment of this paper is to evaluate the effect of different preheating of the metal mould on the resulting structure and hardness of test castings made of AlSi7Mg0.3 material. The hardness measurement will be evaluated on a hardness tester. The parameter SDAS, Microporosity, Content of excluded eutectic will be evaluated. Dependencies will be found and plotted.
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Authors and Affiliations

F. Radkovský
1
ORCID: ORCID
M. Gawronová
1
ORCID: ORCID
I. Kroupová
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, Czech Republic

Instructions for authors

Submission


To submit the article, please use the Editorial System provided here:

https://www.editorialsystem.com/afe


Papers submitted in any other way will not be accepted.



The Journal does not have submission charges.


The APC Article Processing Charge is 110 euros (500zł for Polish authors). In some cases, the APC is paid as a part of the scientific conference fee, for which the AFE journal is a supportive one. If not, it is payable after the acceptance of the final article by direct money transfer.


Bank account details:


Account holder: Stowarzyszenie Wychowankow Politechniki Slaskiej Kolo Odlewnikow
Account holder address: ul. Towarowa 7, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland
Account numbers: BIC BPKOPLPW IBAN PL17 1020 2401 0000 0202 0183 3748


Instructions for the preparation of an Archives of Foundry Engineering Paper

Publication Ethics Policy


Publication Ethics Policy

The standards of expected ethical behavior for all parties involved in publishing in the Archives of Foundry Engineering journal: the author, the journal editor and editorial board, the peer reviewers and the publisher are listed below.

All the articles submitted for publication in Archives of Foundry Engineering are peer reviewed for authenticity, ethical issues and usefulness as per Review Procedure document.

Duties of Editors
1. Monitoring the ethical standards: Editorial Board monitors the ethical standards of the submitted manuscripts and takes all possible measures against any publication malpractices.
2. Fair play: Submitted manuscripts are evaluated for their scientific content without regard to race, gender, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, citizenship, political ideology or any other issues that is a personal or human right.
3. Publication decisions: The Editor in Chief is responsible for deciding which of the submitted articles should or should not be published. The decision to accept or reject the article is based on its importance, originality, clarity, and its relevance to the scope of the journal and is made after the review process.
4. Confidentiality: The Editor in Chief and the members of the Editorial Board t ensure that all materials submitted to the journal remain confidential during the review process. They must not disclose any information about a submitted manuscript to anyone other than the parties involved in the publishing process i.e., authors, reviewers, potential reviewers, other editorial advisers, and the publisher.
5. Disclosure and conflict of interest: Unpublished materials disclosed in the submitted manuscript must not be used by the Editor and the Editorial Board in their own research without written consent of authors. Editors always precludes business needs from compromising intellectual and ethical standards.
6. Maintain the integrity of the academic record: The editors will guard the integrity of the published academic record by issuing corrections and retractions when needed and pursuing suspected or alleged research and publication misconduct. Plagiarism and fraudulent data is not acceptable. Editorial Board always be willing to publish corrections, clarifications, retractions and apologies when needed.

Retractions of the articles: the Editor in Chief will consider retracting a publication if:
- there are clear evidences that the findings are unreliable, either as a result of misconduct (e.g. data fabrication) or honest error (e.g. miscalculation or experimental error)
- the findings have previously been published elsewhere without proper cross-referencing, permission or justification (cases of redundant publication)
- it constitutes plagiarism or reports unethical research.
Notice of the retraction will be linked to the retracted article (by including the title and authors in the retraction heading), clearly identifies the retracted article and state who is retracting the article. Retraction notices should always mention the reason(s) for retraction to distinguish honest error from misconduct.
Retracted articles will not be removed from printed copies of the journal nor from electronic archives but their retracted status will be indicated as clearly as possible.

Duties of Authors
1. Reporting standards: Authors of original research should present an accurate account of the work performed as well as an objective discussion of its significance. Underlying data should be represented accurately in the paper. The paper should contain sufficient details and references to permit others to replicate the work. The fabrication of results and making of fraudulent or inaccurate statements constitute unethical behavior and will cause rejection or retraction of a manuscript or a published article.
2. Originality and plagiarism: Authors should ensure that they have written entirely original works, and if the authors have used the work and/or words of others they need to be cited or quoted. Plagiarism and fraudulent data is not acceptable.
3. Data access retention: Authors may be asked to provide the raw data for editorial review, should be prepared to provide public access to such data, and should be prepared to retain such data for a reasonable time after publication of their paper.
4. Multiple or concurrent publication: Authors should not in general publish a manuscript describing essentially the same research in more than one journal. Submitting the same manuscript to more than one journal concurrently constitutes unethical publishing behavior and is unacceptable.
5. Authorship of the manuscript: Authorship should be limited to those who have made a significant contribution to the conception, design, execution, or interpretation of the report study. All those who have made contributions should be listed as co-authors. The corresponding author should ensure that all appropriate co-authors and no inappropriate co-authors are included in the paper, and that all co-authors have seen and approved the final version of the paper and have agreed to its submission for publication.
6. Acknowledgement of sources: The proper acknowledgment of the work of others must always be given. The authors should cite publications that have been influential in determining the scope of the reported work.
7. Fundamental errors in published works: When the author discovers a significant error or inaccuracy in his/her own published work, it is the author’s obligation to promptly notify the journal editor or publisher and cooperate with the editor to retract or correct the paper.

Duties of Reviewers
1. Contribution to editorial decisions: Peer reviews assist the editor in making editorial decisions and may also help authors to improve their manuscript.
2. Promptness: Any selected reviewer who feels unqualified to review the research reported in a manuscript or knows that its timely review will be impossible should notify the editor and excuse himself/herself from the review process.
3. Confidentiality: All manuscript received for review must be treated as confidential documents. They must not be shown to or discussed with others except those authorized by the editor.
4. Standards of objectivity: Reviews should be conducted objectively. Personal criticism of the author is inappropriate. Reviewers should express their views clearly with appropriate supporting arguments.
5. Acknowledgement of sources: Reviewers should identify the relevant published work that has not been cited by authors. Any substantial similarity or overlap between the manuscript under consideration and any other published paper should be reported to the editor.
6. Disclosure and conflict of Interest: Privileged information or ideas obtained through peer review must be kept confidential and not used for personal advantage. Reviewers should not consider evaluating manuscripts in which they have conflicts of interest resulting from competitive, collaborative, or other relations with any of the authors, companies, or institutions involved in writing a paper.

Peer-review Procedure


Review Procedure


The Review Procedure for articles submitted to the Archives of Foundry Engineering agrees with the recommendations of the Ministry of Science and Higher Education published in a booklet: ‘Dobre praktyki w procedurach recenzyjnych w nauce’ (MNiSW, Dobre praktyki w procedurach recenzyjnych w nauce, Warszawa 2011).

Papers submitted to the Editorial System are primarily screened by editors with respect to scope, formal issues and used template. Texts with obvious errors (formatting other than requested, missing references, evidently low scientific quality) will be rejected at this stage or will be sent for the adjustments.

Once verified each article is checked by the anti-plagiarism system Cross Check powered by iThenticate®. After the positive response, the article is moved into: Initially verified manuscripts. When the similarity level is too high, the article will be rejected. There is no strict rule (i.e., percentage of the similarity), and it is always subject to the Editor’s decision.
Initially verified manuscripts are then sent to at least four independent referees outside the author’s institution and at least two of them outside of Poland, who:

have no conflict of interests with the author,
are not in professional relationships with the author,
are competent in a given discipline and have at least a doctorate degree and respective
scientific achievements,
have a good reputation as reviewers.


The review form is available online at the Journal’s Editorial System and contains the following sections:

1. Article number and title in the Editorial System

2. The statement of the Reviewer (to choose the right options):

I declare that I have not guessed the identity of the Author. I declare that I have guessed the identity of the Author, but there is no conflict of interest

3. Detailed evaluation of the manuscript against other researches published to this point:

Do you think that the paper title corresponds with its contents?
Yes No
Do you think that the abstract expresses the paper contents well?
Yes No
Are the results or methods presented in the paper novel?
Yes No
Do the author(s) state clearly what they have achieved?
Yes No
Do you find the terminology employed proper?
Yes No
Do you find the bibliography representative and up-to-date?
Yes No
Do you find all necessary illustrations and tables?
Yes No
Do you think that the paper will be of interest to the journal readers?
Yes No

4. Reviewer conclusion

Accept without changes
Accept after changes suggested by reviewer.
Rate manuscript once again after major changes and another review
Reject


5. Information for Editors (not visible for authors).

6. Information for Authors


Reviewing is carried out in the double blind process (authors and reviewers do not know each other’s names).

The appointed reviewers obtain summary of the text and it is his/her decision upon accepting/rejecting the paper for review within a given time period 21 days.

The reviewers are obliged to keep opinions about the paper confidential and to not use knowledge about it before publication.

The reviewers send their review to the Archives of Foundry Engineering by Editorial System. The review is archived in the system.

Editors do not accept reviews, which do not conform to merit and formal rules of scientific reviewing like short positive or negative remarks not supported by a close scrutiny or definitely critical reviews with positive final conclusion. The reviewer’s remarks are sent to the author. He/she has to consider all remarks and revise the text accordingly.

The author of the text has the right to comment on the conclusions in case he/she does not agree with them. He/she can request the article withdrawal at any step of the article processing.

The Editor-in-Chief (supported by members of the Editorial Board) decides on publication based on remarks and conclusions presented by the reviewers, author’s comments and the final version of the manuscript.

The final Editor’s decision can be as follows:
Accept without changes
Reject


The rules for acceptance or rejection of the paper and the review form are available on the Web page of the AFE publisher.

Once a year Editorial Office publishes present list of cooperating reviewers.
Reviewing is free of charge.
All articles, including those rejected and withdrawn, are archived in the Editorial System.

Reviewers

List of Reviewers 2022

Shailee Acharya - S. V. I. T Vasad, India
Vivek Ayar - Birla Vishvakarma Mahavidyalaya Vallabh Vidyanagar, India
Mohammad Azadi - Semnan University, Iran
Azwinur Azwinur - Politeknik Negeri Lhokseumawe, Indonesia
Czesław Baron - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Dariusz Bartocha - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Iwona Bednarczyk - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Artur Bobrowski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków
Poland Łukasz Bohdal - Koszalin University of Technology, Koszalin Poland
Danka Bolibruchova - University of Zilina, Slovak Republic
Joanna Borowiecka-Jamrozek- The Kielce University of Technology, Poland
Debashish Bose - Metso Outotec India Private Limited, Vadodara, India
Andriy Burbelko - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków
Poland Ganesh Chate - KLS Gogte Institute of Technology, India
Murat Çolak - Bayburt University, Turkey
Adam Cwudziński - Politechnika Częstochowska, Częstochowa, Poland
Derya Dispinar- Istanbul Technical University, Turkey
Rafał Dojka - ODLEWNIA RAFAMET Sp. z o. o., Kuźnia Raciborska, Poland
Anna Dolata - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Tomasz Dyl - Gdynia Maritime University, Gdynia, Poland
Maciej Dyzia - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Eray Erzi - Istanbul University, Turkey
Flora Faleschini - University of Padova, Italy
Imre Felde - Obuda University, Hungary
Róbert Findorák - Technical University of Košice, Slovak Republic
Aldona Garbacz-Klempka - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Katarzyna Gawdzińska - Maritime University of Szczecin, Poland
Marek Góral - Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Barbara Grzegorczyk - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Grzegorz Gumienny - Technical University of Lodz, Poland
Ozen Gursoy - University of Padova, Italy
Gábor Gyarmati - University of Miskolc, Hungary
Jakub Hajkowski - Poznan University of Technology, Poland
Marek Hawryluk - Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Poland
Aleš Herman - Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic
Mariusz Holtzer - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Małgorzata Hosadyna-Kondracka - Łukasiewicz Research Network - Krakow Institute of Technology, Poland
Dario Iljkić - University of Rijeka, Croatia
Magdalena Jabłońska - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Nalepa Jakub - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Jarosław Jakubski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Aneta Jakubus - Akademia im. Jakuba z Paradyża w Gorzowie Wielkopolskim, Poland
Łukasz Jamrozowicz - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Krzysztof Janerka - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Karolina Kaczmarska - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Jadwiga Kamińska - Łukasiewicz Research Network – Krakow Institute of Technology, Poland
Justyna Kasinska - Kielce University Technology, Poland
Magdalena Kawalec - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Gholamreza Khalaj - Islamic Azad University, Saveh Branch, Iran
Angelika Kmita - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Marcin Kondracki - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice Poland
Vitaliy Korendiy - Lviv Polytechnic National University, Lviv, Ukraine
Aleksandra Kozłowska - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Ivana Kroupová - VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, Czech Republic
Malgorzata Lagiewka - Politechnika Czestochowska, Częstochowa, Poland
Janusz Lelito - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Jingkun Li - University of Science and Technology Beijing, China
Petr Lichy - Technical University Ostrava, Czech Republic
Y.C. Lin - Central South University, China
Mariusz Łucarz - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Ewa Majchrzak - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Barnali Maji - NIT-Durgapur: National Institute of Technology, Durgapur, India
Pawel Malinowski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Marek Matejka - University of Zilina, Slovak Republic
Bohdan Mochnacki - Technical University of Occupational Safety Management, Katowice, Poland
Grzegorz Moskal - Silesian University of Technology, Poland
Kostiantyn Mykhalenkov - National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Ukraine
Dawid Myszka - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Maciej Nadolski - Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Krzysztof Naplocha - Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland
Daniel Nowak - Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland
Tomáš Obzina - VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, Czech Republic
Peiman Omranian Mohammadi - Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Iran
Zenon Opiekun - Politechnika Rzeszowska, Rzeszów, Poland
Onur Özbek - Duzce University, Turkey
Richard Pastirčák - University of Žilina, Slovak Republic
Miroslawa Pawlyta - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Jacek Pezda - ATH Bielsko-Biała, Poland
Bogdan Piekarski - Zachodniopomorski Uniwersytet Technologiczny, Szczecin, Poland
Jacek Pieprzyca - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Bogusław Pisarek - Politechnika Łódzka, Poland
Marcela Pokusová - Slovak Technical University in Bratislava, Slovak Republic
Hartmut Polzin - TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany
Cezary Rapiejko - Lodz University of Technology, Poland
Arron Rimmer - ADI Treatments, Doranda Way, West Bromwich, West Midlands, United Kingdom
Jaromír Roučka - Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic
Charnnarong Saikaew - Khon Kaen University Thailand Amit Sata - MEFGI, Faculty of Engineering, India
Mariola Saternus - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Vasudev Shinde - DKTE' s Textile and Engineering India Robert Sika - Politechnika Poznańska, Poznań, Poland
Bozo Smoljan - University North Croatia, Croatia
Leszek Sowa - Politechnika Częstochowska, Częstochowa, Poland
Sławomir Spadło - Kielce University of Technology, Poland
Mateusz Stachowicz - Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland
Marcin Stawarz - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Grzegorz Stradomski - Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Roland Suba - Schaeffler Skalica, spol. s r.o., Slovak Republic
Maciej Sułowski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Jan Szajnar - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Michal Szucki - TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany
Tomasz Szymczak - Lodz University of Technology, Poland
Damian Słota - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Grzegorz Tęcza - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Marek Tkocz - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Andrzej Trytek - Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Mirosław Tupaj - Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Robert B Tuttle - Western Michigan University United States Seyed Ebrahim Vahdat - Ayatollah Amoli Branch, Islamic Azad University, Amol, Iran
Iveta Vaskova - Technical University of Kosice, Slovak Republic
Dorota Wilk-Kołodziejczyk - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Ryszard Władysiak - Lodz University of Technology, Poland
Çağlar Yüksel - Atatürk University, Turkey
Renata Zapała - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Jerzy Zych - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Andrzej Zyska - Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland



List of Reviewers 2021

Czesław Baron - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Imam Basori - State University of Jakarta, Indonesia
Leszek Blacha - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice
Poland Artur Bobrowski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Danka Bolibruchova - University of Zilina, Slovak Republic
Pedro Brito - Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Brazil
Marek Bruna - University of Zilina, Slovak Republic
Marcin Brzeziński - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Andriy Burbelko - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Alexandros Charitos - TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany
Ganesh Chate - KLS Gogte Institute of Technology, India
L.Q. Chen - Northeastern University, China
Zhipei Chen - University of Technology, Netherlands
Józef Dańko - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Brij Dhindaw - Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, India
Derya Dispinar - Istanbul Technical University, Turkey
Rafał Dojka - ODLEWNIA RAFAMET Sp. z o. o., Kuźnia Raciborska, Poland
Anna Dolata - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Agnieszka Dulska - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Maciej Dyzia - Silesian University of Technology, Poland
Eray Erzi - Istanbul University, Turkey
Przemysław Fima - Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science PAN, Kraków, Poland
Aldona Garbacz-Klempka - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Dipak Ghosh - Forace Polymers P Ltd., India
Beata Grabowska - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Adam Grajcar - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Grzegorz Gumienny - Technical University of Lodz, Poland
Gábor Gyarmati - Foundry Institute, University of Miskolc, Hungary
Krzysztof Herbuś - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Aleš Herman - Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic
Mariusz Holtzer - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Małgorzata Hosadyna-Kondracka - Łukasiewicz Research Network - Krakow Institute of Technology, Kraków, Poland
Jarosław Jakubski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Krzysztof Janerka - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Robert Jasionowski - Maritime University of Szczecin, Poland
Agata Jażdżewska - Gdansk University of Technology, Poland
Jan Jezierski - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Karolina Kaczmarska - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Jadwiga Kamińska - Centre of Casting Technology, Łukasiewicz Research Network – Krakow Institute of Technology, Poland
Adrian Kampa - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Wojciech Kapturkiewicz- AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Tatiana Karkoszka - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Gholamreza Khalaj - Islamic Azad University, Saveh Branch, Iran
Himanshu Khandelwal - National Institute of Foundry & Forging Technology, Hatia, Ranchi, India
Angelika Kmita - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Grzegorz Kokot - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Ladislav Kolařík - CTU in Prague, Czech Republic
Marcin Kondracki - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Dariusz Kopyciński - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Janusz Kozana - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Tomasz Kozieł - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Aleksandra Kozłowska - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice Poland
Halina Krawiec - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Ivana Kroupová - VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, Czech Republic
Wacław Kuś - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Jacques Lacaze - University of Toulouse, France
Avinash Lakshmikanthan - Nitte Meenakshi Institute of Technology, India
Jaime Lazaro-Nebreda - Brunel Centre for Advanced Solidification Technology, Brunel University London, United Kingdom
Janusz Lelito - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Tomasz Lipiński - University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland
Mariusz Łucarz - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Maria Maj - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Jerzy Mendakiewicz - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Hanna Myalska-Głowacka - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Kostiantyn Mykhalenkov - Physics-Technological Institute of Metals and Alloys, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Ukraine
Dawid Myszka - Politechnika Warszawska, Warszawa, Poland
Maciej Nadolski - Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Daniel Nowak - Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland
Mitsuhiro Okayasu - Okayama University, Japan
Agung Pambudi - Sebelas Maret University in Indonesia, Indonesia
Richard Pastirčák - University of Žilina, Slovak Republic
Bogdan Piekarski - Zachodniopomorski Uniwersytet Technologiczny, Szczecin, Poland
Bogusław Pisarek - Politechnika Łódzka, Poland
Seyda Polat - Kocaeli University, Turkey
Hartmut Polzin - TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany
Alena Pribulova - Technical University of Košice, Slovak Republic
Cezary Rapiejko - Lodz University of Technology, Poland
Arron Rimmer - ADI Treatments, Doranda Way, West Bromwich West Midlands, United Kingdom
Iulian Riposan - Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania
Ferdynand Romankiewicz - Uniwersytet Zielonogórski, Zielona Góra, Poland
Mario Rosso - Politecnico di Torino, Italy
Jaromír Roučka - Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic
Charnnarong Saikaew - Khon Kaen University, Thailand
Mariola Saternus - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Karthik Shankar - Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham , Amritapuri, India
Vasudev Shinde - Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Rajwada, Ichalkaranji, India
Robert Sika - Politechnika Poznańska, Poznań, Poland
Jerzy Sobczak - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Sebastian Sobula - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Marek Soiński - Akademia im. Jakuba z Paradyża w Gorzowie Wielkopolskim, Poland
Mateusz Stachowicz - Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland
Marcin Stawarz - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Andrzej Studnicki - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Mayur Sutaria - Charotar University of Science and Technology, CHARUSAT, Gujarat, India
Maciej Sułowski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Sutiyoko Sutiyoko - Manufacturing Polytechnic of Ceper, Klaten, Indonesia
Tomasz Szymczak - Lodz University of Technology, Poland
Marek Tkocz - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Andrzej Trytek - Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Jacek Trzaska - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Robert B Tuttle - Western Michigan University, United States
Muhammet Uludag - Selcuk University, Turkey
Seyed Ebrahim Vahdat - Ayatollah Amoli Branch, Islamic Azad University, Amol, Iran
Tomasz Wrobel - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Ryszard Władysiak - Lodz University of Technology, Poland
Antonin Zadera - Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic
Renata Zapała - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Bo Zhang - Hunan University of Technology, China
Xiang Zhang - Wuhan University of Science and Technology, China
Eugeniusz Ziółkowski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Sylwia Żymankowska-Kumon - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Andrzej Zyska - Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland



List of Reviewers 2020

Shailee Acharya - S. V. I. T Vasad, India
Mohammad Azadi - Semnan University, Iran
Rafał Babilas - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Czesław Baron - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Dariusz Bartocha - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Emin Bayraktar - Supmeca/LISMMA-Paris, France
Jaroslav Beňo - VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, Czech Republic
Artur Bobrowski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Grzegorz Boczkal - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Wojciech Borek - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Pedro Brito - Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Brazil
Marek Bruna - University of Žilina, Slovak Republic
John Campbell - University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
Ganesh Chate - Gogte Institute of Technology, India
L.Q. Chen - Northeastern University, China
Mirosław Cholewa - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Khanh Dang - Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Viet Nam
Vladislav Deev - Wuhan Textile University, China
Brij Dhindaw - Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, India
Derya Dispinar - Istanbul Technical University, Turkey
Malwina Dojka - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Rafał Dojka - ODLEWNIA RAFAMET Sp. z o. o., Kuźnia Raciborska, Poland
Anna Dolata - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Agnieszka Dulska - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Tomasz Dyl - Gdynia Maritime University, Poland
Maciej Dyzia - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Eray Erzi - Istanbul University, Turkey
Katarzyna Gawdzińska - Maritime University of Szczecin, Poland
Sergii Gerasin - Pryazovskyi State Technical University, Ukraine
Dipak Ghosh - Forace Polymers Ltd, India
Marcin Górny - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Marcin Gołąbczak - Lodz University of Technology, Poland
Beata Grabowska - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Adam Grajcar - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Grzegorz Gumienny - Technical University of Lodz, Poland
Libor Hlavac - VSB Ostrava, Czech Republic
Mariusz Holtzer - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Philippe Jacquet - ECAM, Lyon, France
Jarosław Jakubski - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Damian Janicki - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Witold Janik - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Robert Jasionowski - Maritime University of Szczecin, Poland
Jan Jezierski - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Jadwiga Kamińska - Łukasiewicz Research Network – Krakow Institute of Technology, Poland
Justyna Kasinska - Kielce University Technology, Poland
Magdalena Kawalec - Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza, Kraków, Poland
Angelika Kmita - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Ladislav Kolařík -Institute of Engineering Technology CTU in Prague, Czech Republic
Marcin Kondracki - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Sergey Konovalov - Samara National Research University, Russia
Aleksandra Kozłowska - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Janusz Krawczyk - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Halina Krawiec - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Ivana Kroupová - VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, Czech Republic
Agnieszka Kupiec-Sobczak - Cracow University of Technology, Poland
Tomasz Lipiński - University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland
Aleksander Lisiecki - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Krzysztof Lukaszkowicz - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Mariusz Łucarz - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Katarzyna Major-Gabryś - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Pavlo Maruschak - Ternopil Ivan Pului National Technical University, Ukraine
Sanjay Mohan - Shri Mata Vaishno Devi University, India
Marek Mróz - Politechnika Rzeszowska, Rzeszów, Poland
Sebastian Mróz - Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Kostiantyn Mykhalenkov - National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Ukraine
Dawid Myszka - Politechnika Warszawska, Warszawa, Poland
Maciej Nadolski - Czestochowa University of Technology, Częstochowa, Poland
Konstantin Nikitin - Samara State Technical University, Russia
Daniel Pakuła - Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland


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