Nauki Techniczne

Archives of Acoustics

Zawartość

Archives of Acoustics | 2021 | vol. 46 | No 3 |

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Abstrakt

Nonlinear excitation of the entropy perturbations by magnetosonic waves in a uniform and infinite plasma model is considered. The wave vector of slow or fast mode forms an arbitrary angle θ (0≤θ≤π) with the equilibrium straight magnetic field, and all perturbations are functions of the time and longitudinal coordinate. Thermal conduction is the only factor which destroys isentropicity of wave perturbations and causes the nonlinear excitation of the entropy mode. A dynamic equation is derived which describes excitation of perturbation in the entropy mode in the field of dominant magnetosonic mode. Effects associatiated with temperature dependent and anisotropic thermal conduction are considered and discussed.
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Bibliografia

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Anna Perelomova
1

  1. Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk, Poland
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Abstrakt

Thanks to their excellent strength and durability, composite materials are used to manufacture many important structural elements. In the face of their extensive use, it is crucial to seek suitable methods for monitoring damages and locating their origins. The purpose of the article was to verify the possibility of applying the acoustic emissions (AE) method in the detection of damages in the structures of composite materials. The experimental part comprised static tensile tests carried out on various sandwich composites, including simultaneous registration of elastic waves with increasing loads, carried out with the use of an acousticelectrical sensor connected. The signal obtained from the sensor was then further processed and used to draw up diagrams of the AE hits, amplitude, root mean square of the AE source signal (RMS) and duration in the function of time. These diagrams were then applied on their corresponding stretching curves, the obtained charts were analysed. The results obtained point to a conclusion that the acoustic emissions method can be successfully used to detect and locate composite material damages.
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Bibliografia

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Katarzyna Panasiuk
1
Krzysztof Dudzik
2
Grzegorz Hajdukiewicz
1

  1. Gdynia Maritime University, Faculty of Marine Engineering, Department of Engineering Sciences, Gdynia, Poland
  2. Gdynia Maritime University, Faculty of Marine Engineering, Marine Maintenance Department, Gdynia, Poland
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Abstrakt

The paper presents the results of the application of the hierarchical clustering methods for the classification of the acoustic emission (AE) signals generated by eight basic forms of partial discharges (PD), which can occur in paper-oil insulation of power transformers. Based on the registered AE signals from the particular PD forms, using a frequency descriptor in the form of the power spectral density (PSD) of the signal, their representation in the form of the set of points on plane XY was created. Next, these sets were subjected to analysis using research algorithms consisting of selected clustering methods. Based on the suggested numeric performance indicators, the analysis of the degree of reproduction of the actual distribution of points showing the particular time waveforms of the AE signals from eight adopted PD forms (PD classes) in the obtained clusters was carried out. As a result of the analyses carried out, the clustering algorithms of the highest effectiveness in the identification of all eight PD classes, classified simultaneously, where indicated. Within the research carried out, an attempt to draw general conclusions as to the selection of the most effective hierarchical clustering method studied and the similarity function to be used for classification of the selected basic PD forms.
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Bibliografia

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Sebastian Borucki
1
Jacek Łuczak
1
Marcin Lorenc
1

  1. Opole University of Technology, Opole, Poland
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Abstrakt

A SAW gas sensor based on Zinc Oxide (ZnO) piezoelectric substrate is simulated and evaluated for the detection of the dichloromethane (DCM) volatile organic compound (VOC). The study is performed based on the finite element method (FEM) using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The obtained device response using the ZnO substrate is compared to the one using the typical lithium niobate (LiNbO3) piezoelectric substrate. A thin film of polyisobutylene (PIB) membrane is selected to act as the sensing layer. The obtained results reveal a linear behaviour of the resonance frequency downshift (i.e., the sensor sensitivity) versus the investigated gas concentrations varying from 10 ppm to 100 ppm of DCM gas. Additionally, the sensor response is investigated by applying several thicknesses of PIB ranging from 0.3 μm to 1.0 μm. The observed sensor response shows less dependence on the PIB thickness using the ZnO substrate than the LiNbO3 one.
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Bibliografia

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Mohamed Moustafa
1
Ghaylen Laouini
2
Tariq Alzoubi
2

  1. Department of Physics, School of Sciences and Engineering, The American University in Cairo, Egypt
  2. College of Engineering and Technology, American University of the Middle East, Kuwait
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Abstrakt

The ultrasonic ring array, designed for examining the female breast with the use of ultrasonic transmission tomography (UTT), has been adapted for reflection method trials. By altering the activation time of ultrasonic elementary transducers, the parameters of the focus were changed with the aim at improving the quality of the obtained ultrasound image. For this purpose, a phantom consisting of rods having varying thicknesses was analyzed when moving the position of the focus with the use of dynamic focusing along the symmetry axis of the ring array ranging from 30 to 130 mm from central transducers. In previous trials, which applied an algorithm using the sum of all the acoustic fields, a series of simulations was performed in conditions identical to the phantom trial. This paper documents attempts at improving the parameters of the acoustic field distribution during unconventional focusing. The research here presented is a continuation of examinations focusing on the acoustic field distribution inside the ultrasonic ring array with the aim at finding the best possible cross-section of the female breast using the reflection method.
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Bibliografia

1. Birk M., Kretzek E., Figuli P., Weber M., Becker J., Ruiter N.V. (2016), High-speed medical imaging in 3D ultrasound computer tomography, IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, 27(2): 455–467, doi: 10.1109/TPDS.2015.2405508.
2. Costaridou L. (2005), Medical Image Analysis Method, CRC Press Taylor & Fracis, New York.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Wiktor Staszewski
1 2
Tadeusz Gudra
1
Krzysztof J. Opieliński
1

  1. Department of Acoustics and Multimedia, Faculty of Electronics, Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Wrocław, Poland
  2. T. Marciniak Lower Silesian Specjalist Hospital – Emergency Medicine Centre, Wrocław, Poland
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Abstrakt

The design of neonatal intensive care units (NICU) influences both patient safety and clinical outcomes as well as the acoustic conditions. In NICU exposure to sound pressure levels above the recommended can affect both neonates and healthcare staff.
This study aimed to evaluate the sound pressure levels and to assess noise perception of professionals in a NICU before and after structural modifications and layout redesign.
The measurements were performed with a sound level meter. A questionnaire was given to staff before and after the intervention. The opinion of healthcare staff regarding noise in NICU was better after the intervention, when compared with the responses previously given.
The results showed that noise levels were excessive in the NICU (before and after), exceeding the international recommendations, with the levels ranging between 46.6 dBA to 57.8 dBA before and 52.0 dBA to 54.0 dBA after intervention. Overall, there is a need for more research in order to verify the effectiveness of some actions and strategies to reduce the impact of noise in NICU.
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Bibliografia

1. Ahamed M.F., Campbell D., Horan S., Rosen O. (2017), Noise reduction in the neonatal intensive care unit: a quality improvement initiative, American Journal of Medical Quality, 33(2): 177–184, doi: 10.1177/1062860617711563.
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6. Carvalhais C., Santos J., Vieira da Silva M., Xavier A. (2015), Is there sufficient training of healthcare staff on noise reduction in neonatal intensive care units? A pilot study from NeoNoise Project, Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A, 78(13– 14): 897–903, doi: 10.1080/15287394.2015.1051204.
7. Carvalhais C., Silva M., Xavier A., Santos J. (2017), Newborns safety at neonatal intensive care units: are they exposed to excessive noise during routine health care procedures?, Global Environment Health and Safety, 1(1): 1–3.
8. Domanico R., Davis D.K., Coleman F., Davis B.O. (2011), Documenting the NICU design dilemma: comparative patient progress in open-ward and single family room units, Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association, 31(4): 281– 288, doi: 10.1038/jp.2010.120.
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12. Kent W.T., Tan A.W., Clarke M.C., Bardell T. (2002), Excessive noise levels in the neonatal ICU: potential effects on auditory system development, The Journal of Otolaryngology, 31(6): 355–360, doi: 10.2310/7070.2002.34358.
13. Kol E., Aydin P., Dursun O. (2015), The effectiveness of environmental strategies on noise reduction in a pediatric intensive care unit: Creation of singlepatient bedrooms and reducing noise sources, Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, 20(3); 210–217, doi: 10.1111/jspn.12116.
14. Krueger C., Schue S., Parker L. (2007), Neonatal intensive care unit sound levels before and after structural reconstruction, MCN The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing, 32(6), 358–362, doi: 10.1097/01.NMC.0000298131.55032.76.
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19. Parra J., de Suremain A., Berne Audeoud F., Ego A., Debillon T. (2017), Sound levels in a neonatal intensive care unit significantly exceeded recommendations, especially inside incubators, Acta Paediatrica, 106(12): 1909–1914, doi: 10.1111/apa.13906.
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22. Ramm K., Mannix T., Parry Y., Gaffney M.P.C. (2017), A comparison of sound levels in open plan versus pods in a neonatal intensive care unit, Health Environments Research and Design Journal, 10(3): 30–39, doi: 10.1177/1937586716668636.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Carlos Carvalhais
1 2
Célia Rodrigues
3
Ana Xavier
1
Manuela V. Silva
1
Joana Santos
1 4 5

  1. Scientific Area of Environmental Health, Health and Environment Research Center (CISA), School of Health of Polytechnic Institute of Porto (ESS P.Porto), Porto, Portugal
  2. Epidemiology Research Unit (EPIUnit), Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
  3. PROA/LABIOMEP, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal
  4. Institute of Science and Innovation in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Associated Laboratory for Energy, Transports and Aeronautics (INEGI/LAETA), Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal
  5. Center for Rehabilitation Research (CIR), School of Health of Polytechnic Institute of Porto (ESS P.Porto), Porto, Portugal
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Abstrakt

Mosques are Islamic places of worship where speech and music rituals are performed. Since two different languages are spoken there, mosques are described as bilingual spaces. Among studies on the complex acoustic structure of mosques there are only few studies on speech intelligibility and none on the bilingual characteristics of the mosque. Therefore, a comprehensive study has been carried out to evaluate the acoustic comfort of the contemporary Turkish mosques (CTM) over speech intelligibility of Turkish and Arabic languages. In the study the CTM model providing optimum acoustic conditions recommended in the literature is examined on speech intelligibility by applying acoustic simulation and auralisation techniques, as well as word recognition tests. As a result, the acoustic condition in the model is found insufficient in terms of speech intelligibility of both languages. Also, with the decrease of Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), the Turkish intelligibility ratio is observed to decrease at least two times faster than the Arabic ones.
This study is viewed as an outline for researchers to further study mosque acoustics in terms of speech intelligibility, and thus support the standardisation process of the acoustic comfort criteria for the mosques.
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Bibliografia

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Elma Alic
1
Asli Ozcevik Bilen
1

  1. Department of Architecture, Eskisehir Technical University, Eskisehir, Turkey
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Abstrakt

The lower limit of pitch (LLP) perception was explored for pure tones, sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) tones with a carrier frequency of 125 Hz, and trains of 125-Hz tone pips, using an adaptive procedure to estimate the lowest repetition rate for which a tonal/humming quality was heard. The LLP was similar for the three stimulus types, averaging 19 Hz. There were marked individual differences, which were correlated to some extent across stimulus types. The pure-tone stimuli contained a single resolved harmonic, whereas the SAM tones and tone-pip trains contained only unresolved components, whose frequencies did not necessarily form a harmonic series. The similarity of the LLP across stimulus types suggests that the LLP is determined by the repetition period of the sound for pure tones, and the envelope repetition period for complex stimuli. The results are consistent with the idea that the LLP is determined by a periodicity analysis in the auditory system, and that the longest time interval between waveform or envelope peaks for which this analysis can be performed is approximately 53 ms.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Carlos Jurado
1
Marcelo Larrea
1
Brian C.J. Moore
2

  1. Escuela de Ingeniería en Sonido y Acústica, Universidad de Las Américas, Avenue Granados and Colimes, EC170125, Ecuador
  2. Cambridge Hearing Group, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England
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Abstrakt

This research determines an identification system for the types of Beiguan music – a historical, nonclassical music genre – by combining artificial neural network (ANN), social tagging, and music information retrieval (MIR). Based on the strategy of social tagging, the procedure of this research includes: evaluating the qualifying features of 48 Beiguan music recordings, quantifying 11 music indexes representing tempo and instrumental features, feeding these sets of quantized data into a three-layered ANN, and executing three rounds of testing, with each round containing 30 times of identification. The result of ANN testing reaches a satisfying correctness (97% overall) on classifying three types of Beiguan music. The purpose of this research is to provide a general attesting method, which can identify diversities within the selected non-classical music genre, Beiguan. The research also quantifies significant musical indexes, which can be effectively identified. The advantages of this method include improving data processing efficiency, fast MIR, and evoking possible musical connections from the high-relation result of statistical analyses.
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Bibliografia

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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Yu-Hsin Chang
1
Shu-Nung Yao
2

  1. Department of Music, Tainan National University of the Arts, No. 66, Daqi, Guantian Dist., Tainan City 72045, Taiwan
  2. Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taipei University, No. 151, University Rd., Sanxia District, New Taipei City 237303, Taiwan
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Abstrakt

Gears are essential machine elements used to transmit power and motion from one unit to another under desired angular velocity ratio. Various types of gears have been developed to fulfill power transmission requirements in industrial applications. Under normal or fluctuating operating conditions, increase in fatigue load cycles, transition in lubrication regimes, fluctuating loads and speeds, etc., result in various surface fatigue wear modes which affect the performance of geared system. The severity of wear anomalies developed on gear tooth surfaces can be assessed by using vibration signals acquired from the gear box. On the other hand, reliable wear assessment is very important to perform maintenance action which depends on the sensors, data acquisition procedure, vibration signal analysis and interpretation. This paper presents results of the experimental investigations carried out to assess initiation and propagation of surface fatigue failure wear modes developed on gear tooth contact surfaces. A FZG back to back power recirculation type spur gearbox was used to conduct fatigue test experiments on spur gears under accelerated test conditions. Accelerated test conditions resulted in a rapid transition of lubrication regimes, i.e., hydrodynamic lubrication regime to boundary lubrication regime which triggered surface fatigue faults on gear tooth surfaces. A cepstral analysis method was used to assess fault severity in the geared system. The results obtained from the cepstral features were correlated to various surface fatigue faults and reduction in gear tooth stiffness. Results obtained from the experimental investigations highlighted the suitability of cepstral features to assess incipient faults developed on spur gear tooth surfaces.
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Bibliografia

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17. Park C.S., Choi Y.C., Kim Y.H. (2013), Early fault detection in automotive ball bearings using the minimum variance cepstrum, Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing, 38(2): 534–548, doi: 10.1016/ j.ymssp.2013.02.017.
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21. Yesilyurt I., Gu F., Ball A.D. (2003), Gear tooth stiffness reduction measurement using modal analysis and its use in wear fault severity assessment of spur gears, NDT & E International, 36(5): 357–372, doi: 10.1016/S0963-8695(03)00011-2.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Muniyappa Amarnath
1
I.R. Praveen Krishna
2
Ramalingam Krishnamurthy
3

  1. Tribology and Machine Dynamics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Information Technology Design and Manufacturing, Jabalpur,Jabalpur 482001, India
  2. Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram – 695547, India
  3. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras 600025, Tamilnadu, India
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Abstrakt

The core goal of this paper is to put forward a feasible scheme of noise reduction for a target forklift on the basis of solving the problem of vibration and acoustic radiation from complex structures in infinite domain. Based on the previous report and vibration acceleration tests, the acoustic virtual wind tunnel model of forklift power compartment was established using finite element method and boundary element method, in which the perfectly matched layer was first applied to simulate the attenuation propagation of sound waves in air. In addition, according to the distribution characteristics of sound pressure field with different frequencies, the acoustic energy mainly radiated through the bottom and right side, and concentrated in the low frequency. Consequently, the acoustic packaging design for the whole forklift power compartment was presented, and a satisfying noise reduction effect was achieved.
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Bibliografia

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23. Qu W.Z., Fan C.M., Gu Y., Wang F.J. (2019), Analysis of three-dimensional interior acoustic fields by using the localized method of fundamental solutions, Applied Mathematical Modelling, 76: 122–132, doi: 10.1016/j.apm.2019.06.014.
24. Tian W.Y., Yao L.Y., Li L. (2017), A Coupled Smoothed Finite Element-Boundary Element Method for structural-acoustic analysis of shell, Archives of Acoustics, 42(1): 49–59, doi: 10.1515/aoa-2017-0006.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Enlai Zhang
1 2
Zhiqi Liu
2
Jingjing Zhang
3
Jiahe Lin
4

  1. School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen, China
  2. Chengyi University College, Jimei University, Xiamen, China
  3. College of Applied Science and Technology, Hainan University, Danzhou, China
  4. Department of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
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Abstrakt

M-estimators are widely used in active noise control (ANC) systems in order to update the adaptive FIR filter taps. ANC systems reduce the noise level by generating anti-noise signals. Up to now, the evaluation of M-estimators capabilities has shown that there exists a need for further improvements in this area. In this paper, a new improved M-estimator is proposed. The sensitivity of the proposed algorithm to the variations of its constant parameter is checked in feedforward control. The effectiveness of the algorithm in both types is proved by comparing it with previous studies. Simulation results show the steady performance and fast initial convergence of the proposed algorithm.
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Bibliografia

1. Akhtar M.T., Mitsuhashi W. (2010), A modified normalized FxLMS algorithm for active control of impulsive noise, Proceedings of 18th European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO), IEEE, pp. 1–5, Aalborg.
2. Ang L.Y.L., Koh Y.K., Lee H.P. (2017), The performance of active noise-canceling headphones in different noise environments, Applied Acoustics, 122: 16– 22, doi: 10.1016/j.apacoust.2017.02.005.
3. Behera S. K., Das D.P., Subudhi B. (2017), Adaptive nonlinear active noise control algorithm for active headrest with moving error microphones, Applied Acoustics, 123: 9–19, doi: 10.1016/j.apacoust.2017.03.002.
4. Darvish M., Frank S., Paschereit C.O. (2015), Numerical and experimental study on the tonal noise generation of a radial fan, Journal of Turbomachinery, 137(10): 101005, doi: 10.1115/1.4030498.
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7. Khan W.U., Ye Z., Altaf F., Chaudhary N.I., Raja M.A.Z. (2019), A novel application of fireworks heuristic paradigms for reliable treatment of nonlinear active noise control, Applied Acoustics, 146: 246–260, doi: 10.1016/j.apacoust.2018.11.024.
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19. Suhail M., Chand S., Kibria B.G. (2019), Quantile-based robust ridge m-estimator for linear regression model in presence of multicollinearity and outliers, Communications in Statistics-Simulation and Computation, 1–13, doi: 10.1080/03610918.2019.1621339.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Seyed Amir Hoseini Sabzevari
1
Seyed Iman Hoseini Sabzevari
2

  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Gonabad, Gonabad, 9691957678, Iran
  2. Department of Electrical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, 9177948974, Iran
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Abstrakt

This paper describes boundary element method (BEM), experimental and optimization studies conducted to understand the potential of expansion tube coupled micro-perforated cylindrical panel (MPCP) to enhance the acoustic attenuation for in-duct noise control issues. Due to complex structure of the MPCP and for the correct prediction of acoustic attenuation, BEM is adopted on the basis of PLM Simcenter 3D software to compute the sound transmission loss (TL). As the MPCP is cylindrical in-shape with numbers of sub-milimeter holes, additive manufacturing based 3D printing was utilized for the model prototyping to reduce current design limitation and enabled fast fabrication. The TL measurement based two-load method is adopted for modal validation. Subsequently, a parametric studies of the MPCP concerning the perforation hole diameter, perforation ratio and depth of air space are carried out to investigate the acoustical performance. Optimization via response surface method (RSM) is used as it allows evaluating the effects of multiple parameters as required in this study. The model validation result shows that the error between the BEM and and measured values is relatively small and show a good agreement. The R-square value is 0.89. The finding from parametric study shows that a widen peak attenuation can be achieve by reducing the perforation hole diameter and one way to increase the transmission loss amplitude is by increasing the air cavity depth. Finally, the optimized MPCP model was adopted to the commercial vacuum cleaner for the verification. The sound pressure level (SPL) of the vacuum cleaner is significantly attenuated within the objective frequency of 1.7 kHz and its A-weighted SPL is reduced by 1.8 dB.
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Bibliografia

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8. Ishak M.H.H., Ismail F., Aziz M.S.A., Abdullah M.Z., Abas A. (2019), Optimization of 3D IC stacking chip on molded encapsulation process: a response surface methodology approach, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 103(1–4): 1139– 1153, doi: 10.1007/s00170-019-03525-4.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Mohamad Izudin Alisah
1
Lu-Ean Ooi
1
Zaidi Mohd Ripin
1
Ahmad Fadzli Yahaya
2
Kelvin Ho
2

  1. The Vibration Lab, School of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia,14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia
  2. Dyson Manufacturing, 81400 Senai, Johor, Malaysia
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Abstrakt

Cylindrical shells made of composite material form one of the major structural parts in aerospace structures. Many of them are acoustically thick, in which the ring frequencies are much higher than their critical frequencies. In this work, sound radiation behaviour of acoustically thick composite cylinders is presented. Based on the structural and acoustic wave number diagrams, the modal average radiation resistances in the frequency band of interest are theoretically determined. The structural wavenumbers are determined considering transverse shear deformation. The results show lesser sound radiation between the critical and ring frequencies, and significant sound radiation near the ring frequency and beyond. In the absence of the present results the radiation efficiency is considered to be unity at all frequencies beyond the critical frequency, including near the ring frequency. The radiation resistances of the same cylinder are determined experimentally and they are in very good agreement with the theoretical estimates. As part of this investigation, an expression for determining the ring frequency of composite cylinder is also presented.
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Bibliografia

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19. Renji K., Josephine Kelvina Florence S. (2020), Critical frequencies of composite cylindrical Shells, International Journal of Acoustics and Vibration, 25(1): 79–87, doi: 10.20855/ijav.2020.25.11572.
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21. Renji K., Josephine Kelvina Florence S., Sameer Deshpande (2020), An Experimental investigation of modal densities of composite honeycomb sandwich cylindrical shells, International Journal of Acoustics and Vibration, 25(1): 112–120, doi: 10.20855/ijav.2020.25.11626.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

S. Josephine Kelvina Florence
1
K. Renji
2

  1. Structures Group, U. R. Rao Satellite Centre, Bangalore, India-560017
  2. Advanced Technology Development Group, U. R. Rao Satellite Centre Bangalore, India-560017
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Abstrakt

Noise pollution is a major problem nowadays. In urban context, road traffic is the main source of noise pollution. People directly exposed to road traffic noise suffer from moderate to severe annoyance, headache, stress, feeling of exhaustion, and reduced work performance efficiency. As the sources and severity of noise pollution continue to grow, new approaches are needed to reduce the exposure. In this research, noise abatement has been investigated using a computer simulation model (SoundPLAN essential 4.0). Noise maps were developed using SoundPLAN essential 4.0 software. Noise maps are very beneficial to identify the impact of noise pollution. Data required for mapping are noise data (LAeq), road inventory data, geometric features of mapping area, category wise traffic counts, category wise vehicle speed, meteorological data such as wind velocity, humidity, temperature, air pressure. LAeq observed on all locations of the Central zone of Surat city was greater than the prescribed central pollution control board (CPCB) limits during day time and night time. This paper is focused on using acoustic software for the simulation and calculation methods of controlling the traffic noise. According to the characteristics of traffic noise and the techniques of noise reduction, road traffic noise maps were developed using SoundPLAN essential 4.0 software to predict the scope of road traffic noise. On this basis, four reasonable noise control schemes were used to control noise, and the feasibility and application effect of these control schemes can be verified by using the method of simulation modelling. The simulation results show that LAeq is reduced by up to 5 dB(A). The excess noise can be efficiently reduced by using the corresponding noise reduction methods.
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Bibliografia

1. Arana M.R.S., Nagore I., Pérez D. (2013), Main results of strategic noise maps and action plans in Navarre (Spain), Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 185(6): 4951–4957, doi: 10.1007/s10661-012-2916-2.
2. Central Pollution Control Board (2000), Noise pollution regulation in India.
3. Cerdá S., Lacatis R., Gimenez A. (2013), On absorption and scattering coefficient effects in modellisation software, Acoustics Australia, 41(2): 151–155.
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8. Oguntunde P.E., Okagbue H.I., Oguntunde O.A., Odetunmibi O.O. (2019), Public health in Ota Metropolis, Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences, 7(8): 1391, doi: 10.3889/oamjms.2019.234
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10. Prajapati P., Devani A.N. (2017), Review paper on noise reduction using different techniques, International Research Journal of Engineering and Technology (IRJET), 4(3): 522–524, https://irjet.net/archives/V4/i3/IRJET-V4I3145.pdf.
11. Sonaviya D.R., Tandel B.N. (2019a), 2-D noise maps for tier-2 city urban Indian roads, Noise Mapping, 6(1): 1–7, doi: 10.1515/noise-2019-0001.
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13. Sonaviya D.R., Tandel B.N. (2020), Integrated road traffic noise mapping in urban Indian context, Noise Mapping, 7(1): 99–113, doi: 10.1515/noise-2020-0009.
14. Tandel B.N., Macwan J.E.M. (2017), Road traffic noise exposure and hearing impairment among traffic policemen in Surat, Western India, Journal of The Institution of Engineers (India): Series A, 98(1–2): 101–105, doi: 10.1007/s40030-017-0210-6.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Dipeshkumar Ratilal Sonaviya
1
Bhaven N. Tandel
1

  1. Civil Engineering Department, SVNIT Surat, India
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Abstrakt

The article presents the main results of research on plaster samples with different physical parameters of their structure. The basic physical parameter taken into account in the research is plaster aeration. Other physical parameters were also considered, but they play a minor part. The acoustic properties of the modified plaster were measured by the sound absorption coefficient; the results were compared with the absorption coefficient of standard plaster. The influence of other physical, mechanical and thermal properties of plaster was not analyzed. The effect of modified plasters on indoor acoustics was also determined. To this end, an acoustic problem with impedance boundary conditions was solved. The results were achieved by the Meshless Method (MLM) and compared with exact results. It was shown that the increase in plaster aeration translated into an increase in the sound absorption coefficient, followed by a slight decrease in the noise level in the room. Numerical calculations confirmed this conclusion.
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Bibliografia

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3. Branski A., Kocan-Krawczyk A., Predka E. (2017), An influence of the wall acoustic impedance on the room acoustics. The exact solution, Archives of Acoustics, 42(4): 677–687, doi: 10.1515/aoa-2017-0070.
4. Branski A., Predka E. (2018), Nonsingular meshless method in an acoustic indoor problem, Archives of Acoustics, 43(1): 75–82, doi: 10.24425/118082.
5. Branski A., Predka E., Wierzbinska M., Hordij P. (2013), Influence of the plaster physical structure on its acoustic properties, 60th Open Seminar on Acoustics, Rzeszów–Polanczyk (abstract: Archives of Acoustics, 38(3): 437–437).
6. Chen L., Zhao W., Liu C., Chen H., Marburg S. (2019), Isogeometric fast multipole boundary element method based on Burton-Miller formulation for 3D acoustic problems, Archives of Acoustics, 44(3): 475– 492, doi: 10.24425/aoa.2019.129263.
7. Chen L., Li X. (2020), An efficient meshless boundary point interpolation method for acoustic radiation and scattering, Computers & Structures, 229: 106182, doi: 10.1016/j.compstruc.2019.106182.
8. Cucharero J., Hänninen T., Lokki T. (2019), Influence of sound-absorbing material placement on room acoustical parameters, Acoustics, 1(3): 644–660; doi: 10.3390/acoustics1030038.
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10. Kulhav P., Samkov A., Petru M., Pechociakova M. (2018), Improvement of the acoustic attenuation of plaster composites by the addition of shortfibre reinforcement, Advances in Materials Science and Engineering, 2018: Article ID 7356721, 15 pages, doi: 10.1155/2018/7356721.
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16. Mondet B., Brunskog J., Jeong C.-H., Rindel J.H. (2020), From absorption to impedance: Enhancing boundary conditions in room acoustic simulations, Applied Acoustics, 157: 106884, doi: 10.1016/j.apacoust.2019.04.034.
17. Piechowicz J., Czajka I. (2012), Estimation of acoustic impedance for surfaces delimiting the volume of an enclosed space, Archives of Acoustics, 37(1): 97– 102, doi: 10.2478/v10168-012-0013-8.
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19. Predka E., Branski A. (2020), Analysis of the room acoustics with impedance boundary conditions in the full range of acoustic frequencies, Archives of Acoustics, 45(1): 85–92, doi: 10.24425/aoa.2020.132484.
20. Predka E., Kocan-Krawczyk A., Branski A. (2020), Selected aspects of meshless method optimization in the room acoustics with impedance boundary conditions, Archives of Acoustics, 45(4): 647–654, doi: 10.24425/aoa.2020.135252
21. Qu W. (2019), A high accuracy method for longtime evolution of acoustic wave equation, Applied Mathematics Letters, 98: 135–141, doi: 10.1016/j.aml.2019.06.010.
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24. Shebl S.S., Seddeq H.S., Aglan H.A. (2011), Effect of micro-silica loading on the mechanical and acoustic properties of cement pastes, Construction and Building Materials, 25(10): 3903–3908, doi: 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2011.04.021.
25. Stankevicius V., Skripki¯unas G., Grinys A., Miškinis K. (2007), Acoustical characteristics and physical-mechanical properties of plaster with rubber waste additives, Materials Science (Medžiagotyra), 13(4): 304–309.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Edyta Prędka
1
Adam Brański
1
Małgorzata Wierzbińska
2

  1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Fundamentals, Technical University of Rzeszow, Rzeszów, Poland
  2. Department of Materials Science, Technical University of Rzeszow, Rzeszów, Poland
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Abstrakt

Indoor noise can greatly affect the health and comfort of users, so the significance of the right assessment of the compliance with the requirements is obvious. But noise level testing is carried out using different methods, which may not ensure consistency in assessments.
The paper presents the influence of test methods on measurement results determined based on an analysis of inter-laboratory comparative studies. The analyses presented in the paper apply to an equivalent sound pressure level determined for a permanent source of sound – an air-conditioning device. The test methods were characterised according to their precision. In order to compare them, their compatibility was analysed based on the methodology described in the literature, alongside a single-factor analysis of variance. It was determined that there were no grounds for rejecting the hypothesis about lack of statistical differences between the results obtained via different methods. Each of the methods is characterised by different precision, so consequently the same result obtained with each method carries a different risk in regards to noise assessment.
The reason for taking up this kind of research was the decision of the Polish Technical Committee in 2018 about introducing new acoustic requirements in Poland concerning the admissible indoor sound pressure levels. It was decided to implement new international methods of testing indoor sound pressure levels emanating from the service equipment in the building. It was necessary to show the differences between the current method and its new counterparts.
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Bibliografia

1. Batko W.M., Stepien B. (2014), Type a standard uncertainty of long-term noise indicators, Archives of Acoustics, 39(1): 25–36, doi: 10.2478/aoa-2014-0004.
2. Berardi U. (2012), A comparison of measurement standard methods for the sound insulation of building façades, Building Acoustics, 19: 267–282, doi: 10.1260/1351-010X.19.4.267.
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5. Di Bella A., Pontarollo C.M., Granzotto N., Remigi F. (2013), Interlaboratory test for field evaluation of noise from equipment in residential buildings, [in:] AIA-DAGA 2013 Merano, Merano, pp. 1880–1883.
6. EA-4/16 G:2003 (2003), EA guidelines on the expression of uncertainty in quantitative testing, EA, https://european-accreditation.org/publications/ea-4- 16-g/ (retrieved 18.01.2021).
7. Flores M., Fernández-Casal R., Naya S., Tarrío- Saavedra J., Bossano R. (2018), ILS: An R package for statistical analysis in interlaboratory studies, Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, 181: 11–20, doi: 10.1016/j.chemolab.2018.07.013.
8. ISO-10052 (2004), Acoustics – Field measurements of airborne and impact sound insulation and of service equipment sound – Survey method.
9. ISO-16032 (2004), Acoustics – Measurement of sound pressure level from service equipment in buildings – Engineering method.
10. ISO 13528 (2015), Statistical methods for use in proficiency testing by interlaboratory comparison.
11. ISO 5725-2 (1994), Accuracy (trueness and precision) of measurement methods and results – Part 2: Basic method for the determination of repeatability and reproducibility of a standard measurement method.
12. Jagan K., Forbes A.B. (2019), Assessing interlaboratory comparison data adjustment procedures, International Journal of Metrology and Quality Engineering, 10: 1–8, doi: 10.1051/ijmqe/2019003.
13. JCGM 100:2008 (2008), Evaluation of measurement data – Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement, JCGM. 14. JCGM 106:2012 (2012), Evaluation of measurement data: The role of measurement uncertainty in conformity assessment, JCGM.
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16. Kacker R.N., Kessel R., Sommer K.D. (2010), Assessing differences between results determined according to the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement, Journal of Resarch of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, 115: 453–459, doi: 10.6028/jres.115.031
17. Kessel R., Kacker R.N., Sommer K.D. (2011), Combining results from multiple evaluations of the same measurand, Journal of Resarch of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, 116: 809–820, doi: 10.6028/jres.116.023
18. Molenaar J., Cofino W.P., Torfs P.J.J.F. (2018), Efficient and robust analysis of interlaboratory studies, Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, 175: 65–73, doi: 10.1016/j.chemolab.2018.01.003
19. NIST/SEMATECH (2013), e-Handbook of Statistical Methods, Ch. 1.3.5.10, http://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/handbook/ (retrieved 12.08.2020).
20. PN-B-02151-02 (1987), Building acoustics – Noise protection of apartments in buildings – Permissible values of sound level in apartments [in Polish: Akustyka budowlana – Ochrona przed hałasem pomieszczen w budynkach – Dopuszczalne wartosci poziomu dzwieku w pomieszczeniach].
21. PN-B-02156 (1987), Building acoustics – Methods for measurement of sound power of A-level in buildings [in Polish: Akustyka budowlana – Metody pomiaru poziomu dzwieku A w budynkach].
22. Pozzer T., Wunderlich P., Monteneiro C., de Frias J. (2019), Interlaboratory and proficiency tests for field measurements in Brazil, [in:] INTER-NOISE and NOISE-CON Congress and Conference Proceedings, Vol. 259, No. 1, pp. 8120–8130, Institute of Noise Control Engineering, http://www.sea-acustica.es/filead min/INTERNOISE_2019/Fchrs/Proceedings/2200.pdf.
23. Prezelj J., Murovec J. (2017), Traffic noise modelling and measurement: Inter-laboratory comparison, Applied Acoustics, 127: 160–168, doi: 10.1016/j.apacoust.2017.06.010.
24. Przysucha B., Batko W., Szelag A. (2015), Analysis of the accuracy of uncertainty noise measurement, Archives of Acoustics, 40(2): 183–189, doi: 10.1515/aoa-2015-0020.
25. Przysucha B., Szelag A., Pawlik P. (2020), Probability distributions of one-day noise indicators in the process of the type A uncertainty evaluation of longterm noise indicators, Applied Acoustics, 161: 107158, doi: 10.1016/j.apacoust.2019.107158.
26. Scamoni F. et al. (2009), Repeatability and reproducibility of field measurements in buildings, [in:] Proceedings of 8th European Conference on Noise Control 2009, EuroNoise09, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, 26–28 October, 2009.
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29. Seddeq H.S., Medhat A.A. (2011), Indoor noise measurements evaluations for HVAC-Unit using interlaboratory comparisons, International Journal of Metrology and Quality Engineering, 2(2): 75–81, doi: 10.1051/ijmqe/2011104
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Elżbieta Nowicka
1
Ewa Szewczak
1

  1. Building Research Institute, Warsaw, Poland
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Abstrakt

Using perforated tube in exhaust mufflers is known to improve transmission loss (TL) by improving their sound pressure level (SPL) at the orifice. The perforated tube should affect the muffler performance analogous to a shell-and-tube heat exchanger. To the authors’ knowledge, there are few previous assessments reported in literature of the effects that the perforated tube configuration has on acoustic response and pressure drop predicted. The effects of (i) the perforated tube length, (ii) the diameter of tube holes, and (iii) flow through perforated tube were investigated. To assess the perforated tube effect on flow, the SOLIDWORKS 2017 based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool was utilized using real walls approach model with a surface roughness of 0.5 micrometres (AISI 316 cold rolled stainless steel sheet (ss) Ra = 0:5 μm). Perforated tube was found to cause back pressure which may increase SPL about 10%.
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Bibliografia

1. Cui F., Wang Y., Cai R.C. (2014), Improving muffler performance using simulation-based design, [in:] INTER-NOISE and NOISE-CON Congress and Conference Proceedings, 249(7): 1190–1194.
2. Demir A., Çinar Ö.Y. (2009), Propagation of sound in an infinite two-part duct carrying mean flow inserted axially into a larger infinite duct with wall impedance discontinuity, ZAMM – Journal of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, 89(6): 454–465, doi: 10.1002/zamm.200800145.
3. Elsayed A., Bastien C., Jones S., Christensen J., Medina H., Kassem H. (2017), Investigation of baffle configuration effect on the performance of exhaust mufflers, Case Studies in Thermal Engineering, 10: 86–94, doi: 10.1016/j.csite.2017.03.006.
4. Ferziger J.H., Peric M. (2002), Computational Methods for Fluid Dynamics, 3rd ed., Springer, doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-56026-2.
5. Lee I., Selamet A. (2006), Impact of perforation impedance on the transmission loss of reactive and dissipative silencers, The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 120(6): 3706–3713, doi: 10.1121/1.2359703.
6. Mohamad B. (2019), Design and optimization of vehicle muffler using the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings model, Machine Design, 11(3): 101–106, doi: 10.24867/MD.11.2019.3.101-106.
7. Mohamad B., Karoly J., Zelentsov A., Amroune S. (2020), A hybrid method technique for design and optimization of Formula race car exhaust muffler, International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering, 11(2): 174–180, doi: 10.1556/1848.2020.20048.
8. Siano D. (2010), Three-dimensional/one-dimensional numerical correlation study of a three-pass perforated tube, Simulation Modelling Practice and Theory, 19(4): 1143–1153, doi: 10.1016/j.simpat.2010.04.005.
9. Sim H.J., Park S.G., Joe Y.G., Oh J.E. (2008), Design of the intake system for reducing the noise in the automobile using support vector regression, Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology, 22(6): 1121–1131, doi: 10.1007/s12206-008-0306-z.
10. Tiryakioglu B. (2020), Radiation of sound waves by a semi-infinite duct with outer lining and perforated end, Archives of Acoustics, 45(1): 77–84, doi: 10.24425/aoa.2020.132483.
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Autorzy i Afiliacje

Barhm Mohamad
1
Jalics Karoly
1
Andrei Zelentsov
2
Salah Amroune
3

  1. Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Miskolc, Hungary
  2. Piston Engine Department, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow, Russia
  3. Université Mohamed Boudiaf, M’sila, Algérie

Instrukcja dla autorów

Author Guidelines
• Manuscripts intended for publication in Archives of Acoustics should be submitted in pdf format by an on-line procedure.
• Manuscript should be original, and should not be submitted either previously or simultaneously elsewhere, neither in whole, nor in part.
• Submitted papers must be written in good English and proofread by a native speaker.
• Basically, the papers should not exceed 40 000 typographic signs.
• Postal addresses, affiliations and email addresses for each author are required.
• Detailed information see Article Requirements.
• Manuscript should be accompanied by a cover letter containing the information:
o why the paper is submitted to ARCHIVES OF ACOUSTICS,
o suggestion on the field of acoustics related to the topic of the submitted paper,
o the statement that the manuscript is original, the submission has not been previously published, nor was sent to another journal for consideration,
o 3–5 names of suggested reviewers together with their affiliations, full postal and e-mail addresses; at least 3 suggested reviewers should be affiliated with other scientific institutions than the affiliations of the authors,
o author’s suggestion to classification of the paper as the research paper, review paper or technical note.

Article Requirements
1. At submission time only a PDF file is required. After acceptance, authors must submit all source material (see information about Figures). Authors can use their preferred manuscript-preparation software. The journal itself is produced in LaTeX, so accepted articles will be converted to LaTeX at production time.
2. The title of the paper should be as short as possible.
3. Full names and surnames should be given.
4. The full postal address of each affiliation, including the country name should be provided. Affiliations should contain the full postal address, as well as an e-mail address of one author designated as corresponding author.
5. The text should be preceded by a concise abstract (less than 200 words).
6. Keywords should be given.
7. The formulae to be numbered are those referred to in the paper, as well as the final formulae.
8. All notations should be written very distinctly.
9. References in the text (author(s) and year of publication) are to be cited between parentheses.
Items appearing in the reference list should be complete, including surname and the initials of the first name of the author, the full title of the paper/book in English followed by the information on the original paper language. In case of a book, the publisher's name, the place and year of publication should be given. In case of a periodical, the full title of the periodical, consecutive volume number, current issue number, pages, and year of publication should be given. All references in the bibliography should be cited in the text, and arranged in alphabetical order by authors' last name.
For more information on references see http://acoustics.ippt.gov.pl/public/Instructions.pdf.
10. Figures must be of publication quality. Each figure should be saved in separate file and captioned and numbered so that it can float. After acceptance, Authors will need to submit the original source files for all photos, diagrams and graphs in manuscript.
For diagrams and graphs vector EPS or vector PDF files are the most useful. Make sure that what you're saving is vector graphics and not a bitmap. Please also include the original data for any plots. This is particularly important if you are unable to save Excel-generated plots in vector format. Saving them as bitmaps is not useful; please send the Excel (.xls) spreadsheets instead.
Photographs should be high-quality – with resolution no lower than 300 dpi.
Pack all figure files into a single archive (zip, tar, rar or other format) and then upload on the magazine web site.

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